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Star lover
April 11th, 2018, 07:00 AM
The permanent collections of both the British Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London contain knitted wool socks from Egypt and Rome as far back as the 3rd century.

Some still retain their bright red color from more than 1,000 years ago. One pair is knitted in rainbow stripes.

151768

Most are two-toed, with room for the big toe on one side and the rest of the toes on the other — like foot-mittens.

151769. Socks like this pair from Egypt, c.1000 CE, were worn with sandals.

Even our ancient ancestors hated having cold feet.


Found some additional info....

In the modern age:

The English reverend William Lee (born in 1550 in Nottingham) invented the knitting loom in 1589, making knit fabrics far easier to produce.

151770

Queen Elizabeth I received a pair of black stockings from Lee, but declined to grant a patent for his invention, horrified by the socks' crude form and afraid it would take away jobs from her people.

But France's King Henri IV offered Lee financial support, so the inventor moved to Rouen and built a stocking factory. Before long the Huguenots spread the knitting loom throughout Europe.

After the Industrial Revolution the socks, mostly still made of wool, became easier and cheaper to produce, spreading their appeal across European society.

auntstuff
April 11th, 2018, 08:16 AM
The Vikings used a process similar to knitting, only with one needle, to make their socks. I have been learning to do naalbinding, which is what they called the process.

KPH
April 11th, 2018, 08:21 AM
I have a friend that wants to learn to knit socks. Not me. I don't have the patience for it.

Anitamae56
April 11th, 2018, 10:22 AM
My daughter knits and weaves a lot, I will so her info. Thank you!

Angelia
April 11th, 2018, 10:41 AM
Socks are so much better than sea snakes! :)

Carlie Wolf
April 11th, 2018, 03:18 PM
I'm guessing the deep red might have been dyed with cochineal (a bug) and the orange looking red with madder root which was often called Chinese red. I'm not sure about the green which might have had the mortant iron that shifts the color and not sure what the yellowy orange is. Most of the plants that I know about which were historical dyes were not very colorfast and muted over the years so that those colors are still so bright is amazing. Both madder root and cochineal are quite color fast. The mortants were used to "fix" the color or shift the colors.

Just a historical note :-)

Cokie
April 11th, 2018, 06:45 PM
I have a friend that wants to learn to knit socks. Not me. I don't have the patience for it.

I have tried and really would like to but I just can't get the hang of knitting on 3 or 4 needles. I wanted to make myself a pair of hand-knitted socks but I only got one done and it was awful so I gave up. I've had people tell me it's easy but I must be the odd person out on this.

auntstuff
April 11th, 2018, 08:02 PM
I have tried and really would like to but I just can't get the hang of knitting on 3 or 4 needles. I wanted to make myself a pair of hand-knitted socks but I only got one done and it was awful so I gave up. I've had people tell me it's easy but I must be the odd person out on this.

It takes a bit of practice.