PDA

View Full Version : Friday Trivia: Cookbook



Star lover
February 23rd, 2018, 08:09 AM
"The Forme of Cury," a cookbook compiled around 1390 by the master cooks in the household of King Richard II of England, contains nearly 200 recipes, handwritten on parchment.

150522

They run the gamut from "caboches in potage" (cabbage soup), "flaumpeyns" (pork and cheese pies) and "peeres in confyt" (pears in red wine and mulberry syrup) to dishes we'd never consider today.

Furmente with porpeys (cracked wheat with porpoise), anyone?

It is among the oldest English cookery books, and the first to mention olive oil, gourds, and spices such as mace and cloves.

A vellum roll written in late Middle English, transcribed in 1791 by the historian, the Rev. Samuel Pegge, who gave it the name used now. 'Cury', an olde version of the word 'cookery', and was probably pronounced 'Ku-Ury'.


150523


Receipts and excerpts included in The Foods of England have had their spellings modernised, but the many mysterious words are left as they are.

Other Receipts include; Aquapatys, Bacon and Beans, Blank Maunger, Brasey, Buckenade, Bursews, Sauce Madame, Soup Dorye, Spinee.

Blank Maunger: The name means, 'White Eating', a general term for an all-white mixed dish, highly favoured in the late medieval period as indicative of purity.

One example (Cury 1390) is shredded chicken meat with rice (boiled in milk) and ground almonds, flavoured with lard, sugar and salt and decorated with red and white aniseed comfits and fried almonds:

Original Receipt in 'The Forme of Cury' by the Chief Master-Cook of King Richard II, c1390 (Cury 1390)

BLANK MAUNGER

Take capons, cook them, then put them aside. Take blanched almonds, grind them and put them with the broth. Place milk in a pot and add washed rice and let it seethe. Then take the flesh of the capons, tear it small and add thereto. Take white fat, sugar and salt and cast them therein, let it seethe, then present it forth and flourish it with aniseed comfits red and white, and with almonds fried in oil, and serve it forth.



Now doesn't that sound yummy? Something new for dinner tonight......

Hulamoon
February 23rd, 2018, 10:50 AM
I've made "peeres in confyt" before. Red wine poached pears, but without the mulberry syrup. It's a beautiful dessert. You can have the rest of that though. lol

grammaterry
February 23rd, 2018, 11:28 AM
I remember when I was writing my 3rd cookbook, that we went to the tower of London and I remarked to DH that we really hadn't learned anything new since the 10th century. I was struck by the beautiful dinnerware and how difficult it must have been to produce a good soufflé in an open hearth. I collected cookbooks many moons ago and have some outstanding examples of gentlemen's cookery from the early 1800's. Food is a fascinating subject since we all have it in common and apparently since the dawning of man, have sought to make it beautiful and more palatable.

KPH
February 23rd, 2018, 11:33 AM
So glad mom didn't see that cookbook, she would have had to have it. I can't believe all the cookbooks I donated before we moved, especially since mom hated to cook! If she used one recipe out of a cookbook it would have been amazing.

Hulamoon
February 23rd, 2018, 11:53 AM
So glad mom didn't see that cookbook, she would have had to have it. I can't believe all the cookbooks I donated before we moved, especially since mom hated to cook! If she used one recipe out of a cookbook it would have been amazing.

I just gave all my cookbooks to my dd for a garage sale. I felt sad at first because I loved the act of being in the bookstore and leafing through the pages, getting it home....but never making anything. lol All good intentions right?

I was an only child and my mom didn't cook much either. I must of seen the inside of every Los Angeles restaurant.

SuzanneOrleansOntario
February 23rd, 2018, 04:56 PM
Those might have been interesting recipes to try, but probably not very healthy.

I have started giving some of my cookbooks also. I had many that I didn't refer to often, and others I had kept in case I wanted a specific recipe. When I really love a recipe, I write it on pretty recipe cards and laminate them. These are my favorites. Eventually I know that I will get rid of all the cookbooks, as my kids use the Internet to find the recipes they want. I have to say, that I do this more often these days. If it is really good, I still copy to my recipe cards.

I do have my mom's recipe book. She was a really good cook and chef at a local hotel, but lacked in writing the methodology, and just listed the ingredients, not quantities. Luckily, I have been asking her about some of them, and re-writing them on my cards.