PDA

View Full Version : FYI...Dogs & Diffusers



Bubby
February 14th, 2018, 02:42 PM
I bought a diffuser about two weeks ago and have been using it with a few drops of essential oil a little in the living room. I have been noticing for about a week that Dottie has had a few spells of coughing and gagging, similar to before she was diagnosed with congestive heart failure. In the back of my head I've been wondering if the two could be related.

I went to the vet today to buy meds and inquired about using a diffuser around Dottie. Our vet was with a patient but he sent me the message that diffusers should never be used around dogs because they can cause all sorts of very serious side effects. He told me to unplug mine asap. When I actually speak with him in person I will find out more.

If you are using a diffuser around your pet(s) you might want to check with your vet.

Star lover
February 14th, 2018, 02:50 PM
Good to know! Thank you!

auntstuff
February 14th, 2018, 03:11 PM
I can.t handle them around ME! I get the same reaction.

quiltsRfun
February 14th, 2018, 03:48 PM
Thanks for this information. I was thinking of getting a diffuser.

K. McEuen
February 14th, 2018, 03:52 PM
Many of the essential oils that have become very popular lately are toxic to both cats and dogs and almost always to household birds. I can't tolerate a lot of them myself.

bubba
February 14th, 2018, 05:10 PM
I read this about this a few weeks ago, but the woman who wrote it lost her dog from the reaction. When I went to Sisters with my sister, she brought her diffuser. After about four hours of trying to sleep, I had to get up and unplug it. I had had several bloody noses, my throat was sore and I could barely breathe! I use essential oils for NOTHING!!! My friend sells them and swears they cause no allergic reactions, but I know they did to me and also my nephew. I'm sure there are others.

Monique
February 14th, 2018, 05:16 PM
https://www.thealternativedaily.com/are-essential-oils-harming-your-pets-heres-how-to-know/

TMP
February 14th, 2018, 06:02 PM
Thank you, so much for the information. I received one for Christmas but have not used it . Some perfumes give me horrible headaches and I sure don't want to make Sandy sick.

songbird857
February 14th, 2018, 07:02 PM
I haven't used essential oils, but I have used the glade plugins with the little glass dispensers - I can't stand the smell of them. The only thing I can burn are candles :)

JCY
February 14th, 2018, 08:01 PM
The last time I was at my son's house, his wife had a diffuser in the dining room. I couldn't stand the odor & moved it into another room where I wouldn't have to smell it. I haven't used fabric softener or dryer sheets for >30 yrs. After working at the hosp. for 18 yrs. where we couldn't use any fragranced products, I can hardly stand the smell of people's perfume, cologne, or even clothing that has been laundered with fabric softeners. I have become very sensitive to fragrances the older I get. Perfumes & strong odors can be life threatening to people who have respiratory problems like asthma or Restrictive Airway Disease, etc. When I get my monthly massage, the therapist uses an unscented massage cream. We use unscented hand lotions & deodorants. The only time candles get burned at our house is if the power goes out; they are unscented.

grammaterry
February 14th, 2018, 08:46 PM
really good to know. And you know, if its not good for dogs its probably not good for people

jjkaiser
February 14th, 2018, 10:23 PM
What are you talking about? I never heard of a diffuser so I am pretty sure I don't have one.

Hulamoon
February 14th, 2018, 10:42 PM
What are you talking about? I never heard of a diffuser so I am pretty sure I don't have one.

It's Aromatherapy. Think high end incense. I buy gardenia candles and that's about all I can handle. I sneeze with most soaps. lol

jjkaiser
February 14th, 2018, 11:07 PM
Thanks for explaining. Now I get it. I bet some of them are really strong. My niece used to sell something called Scentsy, so I am thinking it must be something like that.

Suzette
February 15th, 2018, 10:56 AM
Actually, I would check with a certified aromatherapist that specializes in animals aromatherapy. Many vets often do not truly know and understand essential oils. I know several vets in my area that are amazing, wonderful vets and they okay the use of EO's around animals simply because they aren't educated or knowledgeable in this area. Like a lot of people, they think they are simply nice smelling, benign substances rather than highly concentrated powerhouses that need to be understood, respected and used wisely and appropriately.

You can join a FB group called Animal Aromatherapy (safe use). The owner of that group is a certified animal aromatherapist and highly knowledgeable. She is currently not taking new question (though you can still join the group) because she is working on creating a new course for certification. But you can still access the extensive files and use the search feature to help you use your oils safely around your pets.

And this is important to know... Cats lack the liver enzyme necessary to metabolize (break down) essential oils. Because of this, exposure to EO's will cause a toxicity to build up over time and damage their liver causing illness and sometimes death. So you cannot diffuse around them, never put EO's on them and do not let them lick you if you have applied EO's to yourself.

Dogs do not have this issue, but still there are many oils you cannot use around them. Joining that FB group will be of great value to pet owners who want to use EO's safely around their pets.

Bubby
February 15th, 2018, 11:03 AM
My Dottie is 10 yo and has congestive heart failure. I'm not going to risk it with her. My vet is quite knowledgeable but I haven't had time to speak to him in person about this. I will post more info after I talk to him. For now his admonition to not use a diffuser is enough.

seaturtle
February 15th, 2018, 11:12 AM
I don't have a diffuser and don't use EO, but my daughter does. I will mention this to her - she has cats and a dog. I would not have thought of this.

Nwmnteacher
February 15th, 2018, 12:58 PM
Thanks for the informative article, Monique. I don't use EOs, but I do use scented candles and wax melts.

Jeanne

tsladaritz
February 15th, 2018, 02:31 PM
There are several oils that are if not poisonous then very close to it for animals. LIke my cats should not be around citrus. Because I use lemon in my asthma blend, I don't diffuse that one in a general room. I apply the oil to myself and will use it in a bedroom if needed to help purify air but they can choose not to be in that room and usually will. They will sniff my hand and then walk off. Oils absorb into your skin in about 10 minutes completely and then you can wash your hands and not worry about touching your pets.
There are even a few oils that work for them. I put very diluted lavender on my hand, then pet the cats when I had to load them up for a 3 hour car ride to move into our new house. They did great.

Just remember pets are are so much smaller and more sensitive oils have to be diluted about 20x more than you would dilute for a human.

tsladaritz
February 15th, 2018, 02:35 PM
Yes, each person is different!
And they should be highly diluted. Many people just figure if 1 drop is good then 10 must be better.
I can use most but a few I don't use that most say they never have a problem with. These things have to be used with great caution.

tsladaritz
February 15th, 2018, 02:41 PM
Actually, I would check with a certified aromatherapist that specializes in animals aromatherapy. Many vets often do not truly know and understand essential oils. I know several vets in my area that are amazing, wonderful vets and they okay the use of EO's around animals simply because they aren't educated or knowledgeable in this area. Like a lot of people, they think they are simply nice smelling, benign substances rather than highly concentrated powerhouses that need to be understood, respected and used wisely and appropriately.

You can join a FB group called Animal Aromatherapy (safe use). The owner of that group is a certified animal aromatherapist and highly knowledgeable. She is currently not taking new question (though you can still join the group) because she is working on creating a new course for certification. But you can still access the extensive files and use the search feature to help you use your oils safely around your pets.

And this is important to know... Cats lack the liver enzyme necessary to metabolize (break down) essential oils. Because of this, exposure to EO's will cause a toxicity to build up over time and damage their liver causing illness and sometimes death. So you cannot diffuse around them, never put EO's on them and do not let them lick you if you have applied EO's to yourself.

Dogs do not have this issue, but still there are many oils you cannot use around them. Joining that FB group will be of great value to pet owners who want to use EO's safely around their pets.

This^
The only time i have resorted to oils with my cats is when we moved. The only way to get my 17 pound cat who is terrified of everything into a carrier and into the car was to give her about a 50x diluted essence that was on my hand. 1 swipe down her neck on her super heavy coat of fur so it just was in the air she breathed. She let me put her into the carrier and into the car without completely losing it. We got to the new house and she was fine. In fact the other cat was a whiny thing they whole way and he did not have it but I had not expected trouble from him. LOL When we got here after a few days we installed the new cat tree and sat all their favorite toys on it, then I took a snip of cat nip in my hand and rubbed it all over that. They were happy campers. I felt like the risk of her having that oil vs. me not being able to get her moved was worth it. But I do not condone that for anyone else to do. Each situation is different.

pewa88
February 15th, 2018, 03:06 PM
There are safe EOs that can be used around pets. My son is a veterinarian and they diffuse Lavender in the clinic waiting area and it is actually calming to the animals. The dilutions need to be adhered to and many people think with EOs that more is better, which is not the case. Just takes a bit of education. There is also lots of misinformation so it is best to check with your own vet to make sure.