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View Full Version : Is it possible to learn to play the piano . . .



kaydee
January 17th, 2017, 03:59 PM
if you're . . . um . . . well let's just go with "over 50"?

I have both a piano and an organ in my house. I don't know how to play either.

I have the organ b/c it was my grandfather's, and when he passed, my grandmother said I could have it. Only it turns out she couldn't part with it until she passed some 30 years later. By then I already had children and bought a piano which my daughter learned to play.

Now that my daughter has moved on in her life, the piano and organ both just sit. I love piano music and would love to learn to play. (It's actually a Clavinova if that makes a difference.)

Has anyone else learned to play the piano at an old older age? I've had people tell me I'm too old to learn. :(

Also, I'm thinking of getting rid of the organ. No one has played it since my gf died in 1973. At this point itt seems more like a monument than anything else. A picture would do just as well. Do you it would be terrible of me to get rid of it?

Oh, I should probably add that I know a little bit about reading music. I play Clarinet through high school.

Sandy Navas
January 17th, 2017, 04:10 PM
YES! You can do anything you set your heart to. It just takes practice. There are lots and lots of beginner books out there. Jump in with both feet and get them wet!

Hulamoon
January 17th, 2017, 04:19 PM
I don't think it would be terrible. I grew up with an organ and my mom brought in a teacher for lessons. Umm, I didn't take to it. Then later in college I took some early education classes and the piano was in the curriculum. Umm, still not interested. I was learning the flute for awhile. I liked that. Not so great at reading music. I did better in art.

I can feel your guilt on getting rid of family things. But after losing all of mine one by one you can only hang on to so much.

shawnan
January 17th, 2017, 04:21 PM
A friend of mine learned to play - took lessons - after she retired. The lessons were a gift to herself because she had always wanted to learn. She played one day at church. I think it was the processional but I'm not sure, doesn't matter, because the point is she had enough ability with her skills to play in public. I'm not sure of her exact age, but I do know she's in her 70's. Go for it!

Nancy

mischiefkat
January 17th, 2017, 04:32 PM
It is great you want to learn the piano. Don't know how old you are, but older folks make better students in many aspects. Not to mention the added aspect of learning a new skill such as the piano, saves those brain cells that die with aging. Your organ would be a good donation to a church,a nursing home, youth group, etc. Your organ& piano may be old but an in home tune up, may help you decide which one you'd like to learn to play. Let the forum know which you chose. Kathy

songbird857
January 17th, 2017, 05:03 PM
In this age of youtube, there are so many things that are accessible! Much of what I have learned about quilting have been from online tutorials. I have been learning the ukulele (full disclosure - I am a musician, but had never played uke til last year). There are so many tutorials out there - go for it!! Also, Hal Leonard publishes a myriad of instruction books from beginner on up - have fun :)

... ooohhh... I just thought of something! When we were homeschooling, my daughters took piano lessons from an older homeschooler who had studied piano for quite a few years. It was a good thing for all of us. Maybe a local music student, or a teacher who can come to your home - so many possibilities!
...... as a side note - Clavinova's are wonderful ;)

Amarillo19
January 17th, 2017, 05:31 PM
Contact a local music store. They always have lists of teachers and some specialize in beginners. Sometimes piano teachers put ads in the newspapers for students. The good thing about going to a teacher is that you have to go and you have to practice. If you're just trying to do it on your own it's too easy to backslide. Go for it. It will satisfy your soul.

Ann

SuzyQue
January 17th, 2017, 05:39 PM
My parents insisted I take piano lessons as a child and till I married. I was ok, but not great. We bought a piano for our children, which were very talented. Now they are gone and the piano needs to be kept in tune, so I have picked it up again. I had kept most of the music we all used, so I started at the beginning and have worked my way through several levels. I am not taking lessons and I tend to work on it for weeks, then let it set for months, repeat. I will never get great, nor perform for others, but I enjoy playing what I want. My mom always wanted to learn and tried to teach herself after my siblings and I left. She could play either hand, but never seemed to figure out how to put them together. I think in her case a teacher might have helped. I am a lifetime learner and I don't think anyone is too old to learn, if they want to put in the effort and time. I say go for it! And let the organ go to someone who will enjoy it, after you take a good picture for yourself.

Snip Snip
January 17th, 2017, 05:40 PM
One issue might be stiff or uncooperative fingers, if you have arthritis. I'm pretty sure I would not be able to do it because of that. Otherwise, Go for it!

Star lover
January 17th, 2017, 06:39 PM
It is NEVER to late to learn anything. I always wanted to play the piano and my mother always said, it costs too much. So I gave up. When I was in my mid 50's I went to The Henry Ford and saw a group of mature adults playing a variety of instruments - it was fabulous! Afterwards I went up to a hammered dulcimer player and he mentioned that he and his wife didn't even start until they were over 60. His wife had been in a car accident and the doc suggested she pick an instrument and it would help with the healing process. She took up hammered dulcimer, he also got interested and they make beautiful music. Since I wasn't 60 . . . Yet I decided to try the hammered dulcimer, and I'm learning. Maybe never for public, but playing and having the time of my life. They say playing an inteument is like learning another language. and learning another language is great a great preventative against Alzheimer's! So don't be afraid, it can only be the next challenge and who knows where it could lead. We shouldn't be afraid to learn new skills in sewing, etc, so why not an instrument? Good luck!

BobW
January 17th, 2017, 07:12 PM
if you're . . . um . . . well let's just go with "over 50"?

I have both a piano and an organ in my house. I don't know how to play either.

I have the organ b/c it was my grandfather's, and when he passed, my grandmother said I could have it. Only it turns out she couldn't part with it until she passed some 30 years later. By then I already had children and bought a piano which my daughter learned to play.

Now that my daughter has moved on in her life, the piano and organ both just sit. I love piano music and would love to learn to play. (It's actually a Clavinova if that makes a difference.)

Has anyone else learned to play the piano at an old older age? I've had people tell me I'm too old to learn. :(

Also, I'm thinking of getting rid of the organ. No one has played it since my gf died in 1973. At this point itt seems more like a monument than anything else. A picture would do just as well. Do you it would be terrible of me to get rid of it?

Oh, I should probably add that I know a little bit about reading music. I play Clarinet through high school.

Of course you can! The fact that you want to learn is the part that makes it easier. I took lessons as a child, didn't play for 30+ years and was given a baby grand as a Christmas Present (I had always wanted one, and we had bought a home that had the space for it) and I started back taking lessons again. I found a teacher who specialized and was comfortable in teaching adults.

Good luck and go for it.

grammaterry
January 17th, 2017, 08:18 PM
If you could play the clarinet, you can learn the piano. I also have a piano in myhouse that the children played and I have offered it to them, but no one wants to come and move it. I've checked craigslist and it doesn't look like they are quick movers and they don't bring much...so learn to play! Get rid of the organ if you can find a buyer. Move forward with your life with zest and enjoy those retirement years. But don't let learning piano interfere with quilting. lol

Mary Lynn
January 17th, 2017, 08:32 PM
Go ahead, take the lessons. At our stage in life anything which gives you personal pleasure is worth it. You can take the time to practice without the distraction of children & work responsibilities.

MayinJerset
January 17th, 2017, 09:38 PM
Hit those Keys Pat and learn how to make some beautiful music.

Vonnie
January 17th, 2017, 11:19 PM
Go for it!

How many of us took up quilting after retiring?

Cokie
January 18th, 2017, 12:01 AM
Go for it! My husband learned to play the trumpet after our youngest son left home, and now he's learning the guitar.

jjkaiser
January 18th, 2017, 02:10 AM
My sister was a private piano teacher for umteen years and said older students were the best ones because it was their choice to take the lessons, Mom and Dad weren't forcing them, and they happily and willingly practiced regularly, sometimes an hour or two a day which meant they progressed even faster too. Go for it! And just enjoy the process. Just think you already have the piano, you don't have to go out and buy one!! I think you can do almost anything at an older age although I wouldn't want to try mountain climbing or something you could get hurt doing (needing surgery) so playing piano seems like a pretty safe thing to do injury-wise!

carolynrae
January 18th, 2017, 03:29 AM
I just turned 68 and 3 years ago I took lessons for just over a year. My piano teacher started taking care of her in laws and she dropped most of her students. I know enough that I can play songs out of books that are made for beginner pianist. She wants to start teaching again, so I might take it up again. You are never to old to learn....and I think it helps keep my brain alert.