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Judy, USMC
January 14th, 2017, 02:28 AM
Every Friday night I watch our University of North Carolina (USA) Public Broadcasting Station which airs foreign made mysteries. So my evening is spent with Miss Fischer, Father Brown and Doctor Blake. Now Doctor Blake is filmed in Australia and there was a phrase I didn't recognize.

There was a woman with children who said her husband had "gone into state." (Hope I heard that correctly.) I'm at a loss for what/where that is.

Thanks for taking the time to explain ~ and feel free to add any other sayings you know are different. Like last year I found out that "getting pi$$ed" did NOT mean someone was getting angry.

Sandy Navas
January 14th, 2017, 08:40 AM
Google search "Aussie phrase 'gone into state'" gave some interesting (though probably totally irrelevant) ideas . . .

Judy, USMC
January 14th, 2017, 05:44 PM
Google search "Aussie phrase 'gone into state'" gave some interesting (though probably totally irrelevant) ideas . . .

That's why I was reaching out to someone who lives there ...
The woman's husband wasn't around so that was the explanation she gave to his absence.

Hulamoon
January 14th, 2017, 06:21 PM
I don't know about Australia, but when ever I heard that I thought it meant fell into sickness, physical or mental. Now I'm curious

Hulamoon
January 14th, 2017, 06:41 PM
Now there is another explanation we use here.

Lying in state is the tradition in which the body of a dead official is placed in a state building, either outside or inside a coffin, to allow the public to pay their respects. It traditionally takes place in the principal government building of a country, state, or city.

Red Rob
January 14th, 2017, 07:23 PM
I'm an Aussie and only new to this forum. This question made me laugh. I'm sure it is "interstate". Meaning he was in another state of Australia.

Judy, USMC
January 14th, 2017, 09:33 PM
Red Rob - Thanks for your post! That does make somewhat sense. If I remember correctly after she said he had gone the investigator said ... "No, he left you."

Let me be the first to welcome you to the forum. I'm sure you will enjoy it here - lots of friendly folks here to help.

cashs mom
January 15th, 2017, 01:13 AM
Thanks for the clarification, Rob.

I just wanted to add I love "Miss Fisher Mysteries (also filmed Down Under), Father Brown and Doctor Blake. PBS has the most wonderful mysteries!

MaryD
January 15th, 2017, 02:37 AM
Father Brown is British, I think. I'd be happy to claim him though. My all time favourite is "Vera" - love the photography, the characters and plot lines - British again.

MayinJerset
January 15th, 2017, 03:43 AM
Have loved most of the PBS Mystries since Morse and Prime Suspect (Helen Mirridan sp?) I'm waiting for them to bring back Vicar Sidney, what a Hunk.

Sheena
January 15th, 2017, 08:04 PM
Father Brown is British, I think. I'd be happy to claim him though. My all time favourite is "Vera" - love the photography, the characters and plot lines - British again.

You can't have either of them! They're both English. Father Brown is the Weasley's dad in Harry Potter. I mean the actor , Mark Williams plays Father Brown and their dad.