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DramaMama
March 27th, 2015, 09:59 PM
Started quilting last year. Are most quilt shops SNOBBY?

Traveled an hour last fall to a Fons & Porter shop.
Walked in w/ hubby; dressed in casual Friday business attire (vs. appearing that we couldn't afford to shop there).

Ready to browse specialty fabric and notions; prepared to spend money.

Employee saw me enter; didn't say a thing; walked past me as I browsed the fabric cases; chatted on occasion to another customer (seemingly one she knew).

I continued toward the end of the store to browse; employee had been at that end since she last walked by me.
She said nothing.

Instead of continuing to browse w/ intent to buy. I sped up towards the door w/ hubby in toe.
He asked, "Don't you want to finish looking?" I replied, "They obviously don't need our money."

Same thing happened to me this past week at Creekside Quilts in Clive, Iowa!
The two employees chatted at the counter after seeing me walk in and one walked right past me.
I was browsing at thread right by the counter; no one said a thing to me. So, I left and near the door I heard, "Thanks for stopping."

I wanted to turn and say, "I just learned about this store and decided to stop since I started quilting last year and want to try to support local shops. While I appreciate someone is not following me around and pressuring me to buy, would it have killed you to say, 'Hi, let me know if I can help you with anything.'"

And that is why I plan to purchase from M* in the future (a 2.5 hour drive) and continue to purchase online from Shabby Fabrics, Keepsake Quilting, Superior Threads, Craftown Fabrics, and Connecting Threads. At least I feel these places appreciate my business.

And that is the end of my rant!

:icon_tape:

Jackiejs
March 27th, 2015, 10:41 PM
Oh Yes !!! Just experinced that last week. I also have to drive 2 hours to Chico, Ca. I had money to burn and a gift certificate. I walked right out. No one said hello, can I help you or anything. I still have the certificate, but won't go back in there.

Jean Sewing Machine
March 27th, 2015, 10:44 PM
Did you go to the Ben Franklin down the street from Fons and Porter ( I'm assuming you were in Winterset)? They are so friendly and have such a fabulous selection! It is so costly for me to go in there, but so worth it! My son and family live in Winterset.

Pandabear
March 27th, 2015, 11:21 PM
I'm sorry for your bad experience. It bites when when employees can't be bothered to even say hello.

I'm thankful my LQS experiences have all been nice.

snippet
March 27th, 2015, 11:49 PM
I've had that experience at one LQS here. It's a shame because I live about a mile from it. It's not just one employee either; I've been there at different days and times and they all ignore me. One of the ladies in my church craft group said the same thing about them, so it's not just me.

Such a shame. I would expect a local shop to be friendly.

Peggy Anne
March 28th, 2015, 12:21 AM
Jean, I love going to the Ben Franklin store. I don't go to Fonts and Porter for the same reason mentioned above. Ben Franklin is a friendly small town store and it is great. Jean when are you going to Winterset again? I can drive now so hopefully I can meet you there.

Jean Sewing Machine
March 28th, 2015, 12:46 AM
Jean, I love going to the Ben Franklin store. I don't go to Fonts and Porter for the same reason mentioned above. Ben Franklin is a friendly small town store and it is great. Jean when are you going to Winterset again? I can drive now so hopefully I can meet you there.

So cool! Glad to hear from you, Peggy Ann! Probably will be going in May.

Claire OneStitchAtATime
March 28th, 2015, 12:56 AM
People are so different sometimes! I sort of prefer to look around in a new-to-me quilt shop without attention. My LQS is like Cheers -- everyone knows my name --they are lovely but sometimes I just want to shop & not chat. I'll let them know when I want help :)

Hulamoon
March 28th, 2015, 01:04 AM
My shop girls (3 shops)don't aways say hi right away. They are to busy. There is a lot of tourists that seem to like to shop for fabric while on vacation. lol They always come say hi after. If the store was completly empty I would wonder though, they all know me pretty well.

DramaMama
March 28th, 2015, 01:13 AM
Did you go to the Ben Franklin down the street from Fons and Porter ( I'm assuming you were in Winterset)? They are so friendly and have such a fabulous selection! It is so costly for me to go in there, but so worth it! My son and family live in Winterset.

Yep! Walked right out and into Ben Franklin! Had planned to go there anyway, but was looking forward to the Fons & Porter. Won't go back there.

redcaboose1717
March 28th, 2015, 01:20 AM
I have had this experience too....not just with quilt shops but with car dealerships as well. In fact about 14 yrs ago, my DH Terry & I walked into a dealership ( right after a little league game my son was the empire ) and we looked a little disheveled after being on a bleacher for a few hours ( it was really warm that day )....The salesman came right up and said " Are you sure you can afford to purchase a car here ? " ......with that comment DH & I went out the door really fast.....2 days later after purchasing the truck we wanted from another dealership down the road, I went back, and went right up to the salesman and asked to see the owner of the dealership....he didn't ask me why I wanted to talk to the owner, but took me back to see him. I told him exactly what had happened the day before. My last comment to him was " Don't judge a book by it's cover. I DID NOT have to finance the truck ...and therefore I should have been treated just like any other customer regardless how the sale was made ( either a loan or cash ) ....The owner apologized all over but it has stopped me from purchasing any autos from that particular brand.....
I have also ran into the same thing with a couple of quilt shops in my area.....can't imagine WHY they go out of business in a few short years, could be that the employees don't realize just how important customers are. My parents owned several small successful business when I was growing up...( and even after I was married too ) and our customers returned to us time and time again....simply because we treated them well....always !
I think this is one of the main reasons MSQC does so well....thank you MSQC !

Kgrammiecaz
March 28th, 2015, 01:27 AM
I stopped going to one of the LQShops due to the snob like behavior. It should not matter how you are dressed or how you look. Well, unless you are scummy dirty. They should treat me well even if I am wearing a tattered tshirt. Maybe I choose to spend my money on my craft and not clothes. I do not expect anyone to hang with me, but I do like when someone recognizes you came in. Just a hi works for me. Heck even Joanns says hi when you walk in.

CraftHer
March 28th, 2015, 01:32 AM
There's a quilt shop close to where I work and I've gone there a few times. Not snobby, but not friendly. Since I go an hour or so before closing, I really feel brushed off or ignored. One time, an employee spent the time to talk to be about batting but that was the only time. It's a shame, too. I love to support local business and I'd rather go to JoAnn's or Hobby Lobby than this shop. There are some quilt shops a little further from where I live and stop by whenever I can. Both of them even have chairs/benches for my husband!

Sherri6474
March 28th, 2015, 01:33 AM
There is a beautiful quilt shop about 40 minutes from me. It is a beautiful store in a historic part of town. The first time I went in, I felt like an unwanted guest. Not one person in the store would give you the time of day and acted like it was in an inconvenience to cut fabric and ring it up. I have gone back few times and they are a tad more friendly but nothing to write home about.

IBake
March 28th, 2015, 02:30 AM
I use WEB Fabrics-the brick and mortar part. They are my guardian angels. I have called from the cabin in Canada because I am short a yard of fabric and Kerry, the manager has dug out it and the matching fabric and sent them on to me.....When I go in, the first thing they ask is "Where is Craig?" My hubby. They enjoy him so much. They are the type of store that you want to have in your neighborhood.

BUT I understand what you mean. My son was in HS-a senior and looking to buys stereo speakers. He had cash to burn. We went into a big stereo store. There were three employees, one customer. They looked up and watched us walk in, not a word. Finally as we walked out, someone said, "need help?" I was furious at this point. I told the manager, no sense talking to the clerks...that they saw us walk in, no help, no word. I told him that my son had money to burn, needed help and got none. He said he would help now...I said DON'T BOTHER. By the time I was done they had red ears and couldn't wait for me to leave...........

DramaMama
March 28th, 2015, 07:23 AM
I think this is one of the main reasons MSQC does so well....thank you MSQC !

Yes, I was marveling at how successful M* appears to be after being in business for only 7 years. From a start-up business standpoint that is CRAZY INCREDIBLE! Good for them! And great for us to have such a resource.

rebeccas-sewing
March 28th, 2015, 07:44 AM
I like to remain anonymous when I shop so being ignored is the way I like it. Different strokes for different folks. I go into very few shops here in Baarn. They are all tiny and there is usually no one in them or very few people. I hate feeling like I'm being watched when I'm looking around.

Suzette
March 28th, 2015, 08:59 AM
A little friendliness sure goes a long way. No one is ever that busy that they can't look up and say a simple "hi!" when you walk in the door of their establishment. That's all it takes to make us feel welcome and our patronage appreciated.

I love my LQS. No matter how many people are in the shop or what they are doing, the employees always look over when the door opens and they give (at the very least) a quick, friendly hello when you walk in. I love that!

BeckyLeeSews
March 28th, 2015, 09:00 AM
I happened to become friends with a long arm quilter and told her I would no longer shop at my LQS because the lady who owns it is snotty even though I've spent scads of money in there in the past. My friend then proceeded to unload all the gory details of the drama that goes on in this quilt store and said it's rampant across the industry between owners, employees, customers, etc. But what you say is totally true - sometimes it feels as if there is a "clique" that you're not privy to when you walk into some stores. That's why free-shipping and I are very good friends!

Alpha O
March 28th, 2015, 09:25 AM
I guess some owners have the "Macy's" syndrome. Spotted an article that said Macy's sales were down since women felt that lipstick was required to shop at Macy's and they didn't feel like putting lipstick on! (I don't own any. I've always hated it) My mother was of the generation that put on a hat and white gloves to go to town. Catch me doing that!

I just ignore people. I get my questions answered which is all I want. I'm of the belief that clothes don't make the person, and it shouldn't matter what you have on as long as you can't get busted for indecent exposure. Watch the body language, expressions and manners, not the clothes. My much patched jeans are a tribute to my embroidery machine and serger. Good advertising if the store sells machines. People don't realize how fancy you can make patches.

I also have my preferences as to colors and will mix and match fabric from many stores and ignore the line the pattern uses. That's the whole reason to sew. To do things your way.

Snip Snip
March 28th, 2015, 09:59 AM
You know, I have had the same experiences in small quilt shops, and other small shops, but also in big name stores, too. But I got to thinking about the little quilt shops:
* They probably have a loyal customer base who doesn't mind paying extra for brand name fabric, and the free help they get if needed.
* There are probably lots of shoppers who are accustomed to Walmart's or Hancock's or Joann's cheaply priced fabric, and when they go into an independent shop and see the fabric that costs twice as much, they are aghast.
* Many shoppers, being frugal, are likely to speak up and say "I can get fabric (or a sewing machine, or thread, or batting....) for half this price at Walmart!"
* Imagine how frustrating it must be to have to defend your product line and prices over and over, every day. I think it may make even the friendliest clerk or owner hesitant to strike up a conversation with a new person browsing their store. (If I just ignore her, she won't start ranting about the price we have to charge. She probably wouldn't buy anything anyway))
* Even so, downright rudeness sure isn't gaining any new customers. I don't know the answer. If they offered great specials like M* does, even as a loss leader, maybe they could help themselves over come this issue.

Midge
March 28th, 2015, 10:08 AM
Such an interesting thread. Like some of you who have posted, I prefer to shop alone and I'm OK with wandering around alone. I will ask for help when and if I need it. But that said, at least greet me when I walk in the door. Getting the fish eye and being stared at and then having heads turn away tells me I am a pain in the *){ interruption from your chosen activity. Just say hello with a smile and mean it. Ask me if I need help. I will tell you the answer. It doesn't even rise to the level of what I would consider customer service to be. It is basic human courtesy. When a shop employs people who behave like this it tells me that management isn't doing their job either. And when it's a small business managed by the owner, it's even sadder. That is just money falling out of the owner's pockets. Why own the business if you don't want to run it properly? I have heard shop owners and employees moaning and whining during a going out of business sale that no one supports local business, etc. They actually held this convo in front of me. At that point I decided that not even the going out of business bargains were as important to me as telling these 3 idiots exactly why they were losing their jobs. I blistered them then and there with the line of people hanging onto every word. It felt good to explain my experiences in their shop. And even better to tell them that I hoped that in their next job they would put in just a little effort at making that business a success.

buckeyequilter
March 28th, 2015, 10:12 AM
I am about 15 minutes from 2 different shops (different directions). One is friendly and one not so much. I always give a quilt shop (if it's close enough to go again) a second chance. I will continue to stop at the "not so friendly" one, on occasion, if I need thread or know they have a fabric I want.

When I walk in the door of the little Mennonite shop the owner will always say "hi" and if she's busy she lets me know that she'll be with me in a few. So I just wander around looking for what I want. If I take a pattern in with me she always wants to see it and then she's running all over the shop helping me pick out fabrics. The customers even help each other.....giving their opinions on fabric choices. I have even taken in a piece of focus fabric that I have bought elsewhere and she's helped me choose fabric to go with it.

I have noticed in some shops if you ask for help they will immediately warm up to you. Quilter's generally love to help other quilter's pick out fabrics.

Marta
March 28th, 2015, 10:16 AM
I have never had a bad experience in a quilt shop , not state side or here in brazil or online. That is probably why my Hobby savings account has very low balance.

janbee
March 28th, 2015, 10:58 AM
Having worked in a quilt shop when the owner was out of town, I can tell you that I did my best to make sure every customer whether I knew them or not, whether they were nice to me or not, was welcomed when they came in the door. If the shopper's husband came in, I showed him the easy chair that was provided for "husbands" and offered him a bottle of water. I would say, "i will be glad to help you" if they responded they would just like to look around, then I would leave them alone. I always would mention something like "we just got in a new line of so and so or we have the new blah blah blah book".

On the other side of the coin, I cannot tell you the number of rude comments that I have heard--"I cannot believe the price of this fabric", "I can find fabric just as good at Wal-Mart", "I do much better work than the quilt hanging right here", "Could you please just tell me how to make this block so I won't have to buy the pattern"?, "I need you to cut 2-1/2 inch strips of these 42 fabrics right here so I won't have to buy a jelly roll"--which I did by the way---even though the shop was crowded with customers--then the woman griped and complained because the fabric was so expensive and was I sure that she was getting the whole 2-1/2" strip. People can be incredibly rude. However, if you have a shop, you are in the customer service business and should treat every one with courtesy. It can be so irritating though. I once spent 4 hours with a customer helping her choose fabric for a Mondo bag and when we got them all stacked on the cutting table she changed her mind and walked out. That is just part of running a business though.

My pet peeve is not quilt shops nearly as much as sewing machine dealerships. There is a certain brand that I will not mention here that is widely known for their extremely superior view of their brand. If you don't own a ___________, you are just so beneath the owners of their brand. I have owned a top of the line machine from their company, paid money out the wazoo for their over priced presser feet, taught classes for that dealership and finally sold that machine because I didn't like it and bought another top of the line Babylock which I love. In my opinion their machines are over priced and do not offer nearly as many neat bells and whistles as my Babylock and the optional presser feet for my machine are literally priced a fourth or less than their presser feet. It should not matter what brand of machine you own. We don't all drive Fords but we are all driving down the highway.

geegeequilts
March 28th, 2015, 11:16 AM
I like to "window shop" for a bit before deciding what I want to buy. With most LQS the employees outnumber customers. BUT..that doesn't excuse not acknowledging my presence. If after a while no one offers to help I may leave (if I'm buying) & go to Joanns, Hobby Lobby, & yes even Walmart. I buy the best I can afford & do not automatically go for the cheapest. Because LQS fabric costs an arm & a leg the employees expect the elite customer. Money talks whether you are dressed to the nine's or wearing cutoffs & flip-flops. LQS owners...speak to your customers! And nicely! They might not buy today but they will in the future. Remember..no customers no LQS.

Gina

Heather
March 28th, 2015, 11:22 AM
I’ve been in shops and ignored, too, but have gotten used to it. I think a lot has to do with my age, I am maybe a decade or two younger than many quilters in my area. If I’m traveling and stop in a new shop I guess they figure I've bounced in off the turnip truck or something. All of my LQS’ have always been friendly and they greet everyone as they come in. There is only one I really don’t frequent now. It expanded and instead of one big room it split up into many separate rooms which actually used to be standalone offices in the building. The proprietor has to follow you around and unlock the doors for you as you browse. She never leaves your side, makes you feel like you’re doing something wrong the entire time.

Vonnie
March 28th, 2015, 11:32 AM
The worse experience I have ever had was at a car dealership. I was just out of basic training and tech school and I needed a car. I was home on leave and my aunt told me about a sale at a local dealership. She took me over there and the first thing the sales person asked was how much could I put down. I said I had $300. He told me to come back when I had more money for a down payment. I had my heart set on buying a VW Rabbit. Well, my aunt said they were not the only dealers in town so she took me to the Datsun dealer. I immediately told the salesperson that I had $300 to put down. He told me that since I was on a 4 year enlistment that I had a guaranteed paycheck for the next four years and he worked with me to get my car. It was a little Datsun B-210. I loved that car. Had it for 8 years.

One business got my business and the other lost a sale.

Kajenkids
March 28th, 2015, 11:50 AM
It expanded and instead of one big room it split up into many separate rooms which actually used to be standalone offices in the building. The proprietor has to follow you around and unlock the doors for you as you browse. She never leaves your side, makes you feel like you’re doing something wrong the entire time.

Eww. I would NOT be shopping there! I make jewelry too and there are bead shops I will not go to because they act like I'm going to steal if they take their eyes off me for one second. I even went to one shop where they had little lockers where you were required to leave your purse. I didnt leave my purse, I just left...

Carrie J
March 28th, 2015, 11:53 AM
This subject/problem seems to be prevalent no matter the location! There are three LQS within 30-40 minutes driving time from me. One LQS has only been open a year this coming June. It's like "old home" week when you walk thru that door, a retired Nurse owns it, and has a lovely buoyant, upbeat personality. The two ladies that help her, in their 70's, are full of grins and mischief, always a smile and excited to see you and offer help and advice, ask about your current project you have going, and it's chatter-chatter if you want it. They dive in like Pearl Divers when it comes to matching fabrics with you, and fun as all get out! The side comments are killer! I have a big mouth, and love to chat, so win, win! She is growing by leaps-n-bounds, Simply because of the atmosphere, this particular Owner has generated and projects from the get go! The other two shops could give a rats butt about ANY kind of greeting, let alone help. Starting a conversation with them, is akin to having teeth pulled without novacaine! Guess which one I frequent?

Having owned a business for many years, it takes very little effort to make anyone feel at home and comfortable. Word of mouth is a mighty tool, and have never understood the lack of courtesy and warmth upon entering any business. Women talk, and are the greatest purveyors of good or bad reviews on the planet! Any retail job is a tough one, and yes some customers can be a total PITB, it comes with that particular territory. And at the end of the day, the good customers/owners take away the bad. :D

Amarillo19
March 28th, 2015, 12:13 PM
I would definitely write a letter to the owners of those shops and politely explain exactly what happened. Also mention you won't be back and will talk about it on MSQC. They'll fall all over themselves trying to make it right. That happened to me in an appliance store. I wrote to the store manager and he was greatly apologetic.

pcbatiks
March 28th, 2015, 12:17 PM
I think I would be inclined to call or write to Fons & Porter and let them know about your experience or lack thereof. Also let them know how different the experience was at Ben Franklins just down the road. If they care they will take notice of the complaint....if they don't care.........shame on them.

starlover
March 28th, 2015, 01:19 PM
I'm another one who prefers to shop alone. I think and visualize better if I'm by myself. When someone's helping me, half my attention is going to the bits of conversation we're having. Plus I feel like I miss lots of the bolts when someone else is constantly pulling my eye to a different fabric. Always regret the choices I make when someone else is involved in the process.

MartinaG
March 28th, 2015, 01:32 PM
The LQS I frequent most often just moved to a larger building so business is good. They are not an overly friendly crowd when you are a stranger but they are business-friendly. You get a hello or a smile. They gauge if you are browsing and you get a "can I help you find something" and they are always busy. I didn't stay a stranger for long and now I am greeted with more personality.

With the internet at our fingertips LQS owners are plain stupid if they think that poor customer service will sustain them long term.

It is a shame that we often take the safe path of avoidance and simply walk out instead of confronting the staff and asking them if they are intentionally inconsiderate.

sassygranny
March 28th, 2015, 09:01 PM
I'm not sure I understand the problem. I go into a quilt shop to buy fabric - not to make friends. I don't want someone bugging me while I'm browsing. If I have a question, I will seek someone out and ask it. But, the very last thing *I* want is someone following me around or being ultra chatty. Gives me the creeps!

tnmtgrl
March 28th, 2015, 09:42 PM
This is a very interesting thread. I have 3 LQS close and have experienced this at all of them...I thought it was just me ....I am shocked to see how many here have had the same thing happen. Too bad all local LQS can't read this thread!!

Jean Sewing Machine
March 28th, 2015, 11:36 PM
Friendly isn't about following you around, creeping you out, but helping you find something that you are looking for, or an alternative. They are in business to sell something to you. Either they help you find what you are looking for, or a customer with money in his/her pocket walks out the door. A friendly greeting goes a long way toward making a customer feel welcome enough to stick around long enough to part with some moohlah! I just think all customers should be valued as potential sales, not entities to be ignored.

kaydee
March 29th, 2015, 12:05 AM
I am so surprised by the posts in this thread. It never occurred to me to walk out of ANY store if a clerk doesn't say hello when I walk in. Usually, I have my mind focused on what I'm looking for, and I probably wouldn't even notice the clerks when I walk in.

I think this has to be a woman thing. I walked into a Rockler Woodworking Shop with my husband today, and no one said hello to us. I seriously doubt men walk out of a store if no one greets them upon entering.

Now, not getting help when you ask for it is another thing entirely. Other than that, I'd rather be left alone.

Meghan Plamondon
March 29th, 2015, 12:26 AM
Im so sorry you had a bad experience at those stores. In todays business, customer service is really one key to success. I shop as local as I can, at two large fabric stores where the employees don't even see you as you enter. I am used to it, and also not having any employees following me around. I usually have to find an employee when I want my fabric choices cut. However, once I find a busy employee, they have always been super nice and helpful. I have come to realize that at these big stores, the do not hire a lot of employees, which is not the gals fault, and they do the best job that they can. For me, this is what I see as the level of service in the two big fabric stores near me, and I can live with it. However, at a much smaller fabric store, that really does more repairs then sell nice fabric, they have more customer service, but hardly any fabric I can buy. I guess size does make a difference sometimes.

Midge
March 29th, 2015, 12:28 AM
It's not "a woman thing". Please. Don't trivialize the bad behavior of many workers in LQSs and simultaneously take a dig. Please read the comments more carefully. When I am heading into a shop to spend a hundred dollars or more I expect to be treated with courtesy. I don't need fake friendliness or someone following me about, just courtesy and not fish eye stares and being deliberately ignored when I try to catch their eye to get some help. That's what we are talking about here. It begins with being greeted and your existence acknowledged when you walk in a shop, esp. when you are the only customer. I know a lot of men who won't put up with rudeness and then give the shop their hard earned money.

Mpyles
March 29th, 2015, 12:29 AM
Just a question...when you walked in...did you make eye contact and greet them?

jjkaiser
March 29th, 2015, 01:17 AM
Yes I have had this experience at LQS, which soon went out of business about a year after doing a huge renovation doubling the size of their store and inventory. I always wondered if their stuck up attitude had anything to do with their early demise. The store, formerly a residence, is now a halfway house.

kaydee
March 29th, 2015, 01:24 AM
Midge, I do think it is a woman thing. Sorry if that upsets you. I do not think you would find a similar proportion of men who would leave a store simply because they were not greeted upon entering it, and even far less who would never go back for the same reason.

I don't expect a greeting when I enter, and I don't think it's rude to not track every customer down and greet them.

I'm curious, is this just a LQS thing? Would you walk out of other stores if not greeted upon entry? A grocery mart? A liquor store? A library? Is this just small stores? Or does it go for large stores as well?

Why is leaving a customer alone until they ask for help considered rude?

kensington
March 29th, 2015, 01:39 AM
I went to a shop once that no one spoke to me... I found some of the best fabrics I've ever seen there. I bought them and I'd shop there again.

Yes, M* is friendly and allows their peeps to be friendly and chat with you. I love that. They are the best.

But, when I am on a mission to find what I want, I'll buy it from who ever has it. As long as they don't try knocking me down or something stupid... I'll get what I came for and get on the road. LOL

Kajenkids
March 29th, 2015, 01:40 AM
My son is a butcher at a grocery store. He is expected to greet every customer that comes thru his department. Secret shoppers judge him on that and he has received a 100% rating more than once. It really is just about saying hello and letting the customer know you're there if they need you.

kensington
March 29th, 2015, 01:45 AM
I try to live by a verse I heard once long long ago... "If one wants friends, they must show themselves to be friendly"..

I think this sort of thing doesn't bother me and I don't get treated that way often is because I come through the door saying hello, introducing myself, saying nice things about their shops, asking how they are... etc. Unless the shop gets someone new before I come back, they usually remember me. LOL

DramaMama
March 29th, 2015, 02:46 AM
Just a question...when you walked in...did you make eye contact and greet them?

I did make polite eye contact with the two women behind the counter as I entered-- one looked down at something; the other started chatting with another customer in the store -- I got the feeling she was a repeat customer because they started talking about a mutual person they knew that was in the hospital.

As I browsed one of the employees left the counter and when she returned she walked right passed me back to the counter -- where I stood looking at threads on the wall. The thing was: I'm perfectly capable of asking for help if I need it; but no one bothered to greet me -- they just engaged in gossip, not even busy with anything work related.

DramaMama
March 29th, 2015, 02:50 AM
I try to live by a verse I heard once long long ago... "If one wants friends, they must show themselves to be friendly"..

I think this sort of thing doesn't bother me and I don't get treated that way often is because I come through the door saying hello, introducing myself, saying nice things about their shops, asking how they are... etc. Unless the shop gets someone new before I come back, they usually remember me. LOL


I half-jokingly tell my husband (a favorite quote from a TV show): "Please don't make me meet someone new. The last time that happened I made friends."

I don't go shopping to make friends. I do, however, wish to be treated with courtesy.

sewluvit
March 29th, 2015, 03:01 AM
Iíve been in shops and ignored, too, but have gotten used to it. I think a lot has to do with my age, I am maybe a decade or two younger than many quilters in my area. If Iím traveling and stop in a new shop I guess they figure I've bounced in off the turnip truck or something. All of my LQSí have always been friendly and they greet everyone as they come in. There is only one I really donít frequent now. It expanded and instead of one big room it split up into many separate rooms which actually used to be standalone offices in the building. The proprietor has to follow you around and unlock the doors for you as you browse. She never leaves your side, makes you feel like youíre doing something wrong the entire time.

I have been in a couple of shops with rooms on the side but they don't have doors and the staff doesn't follow you around. I certainly couldn't concentrate under those circumstances so I probably would never go back.

tnmtgrl
March 29th, 2015, 08:43 AM
I don't like someone following my every step around a store either but when I walk through the door don't look at me like I'm from another planet. I worked retail for years and I know that to make sales a little courtesy goes a long way.

Iris Girl
March 29th, 2015, 09:10 AM
I don't like to be ignored but neither do I like someone breathing down my neck. If I need help I will ask. Having said that the best prevention to theft in any store is to make eye contact and let your customer know YOU know they are there. I don't shop at the only LQS near me because the prices are out of site. But they do take care of my machine for me and I buy feet and accessories for my machine there. I worked in a big box chain fabric store for 20 years most of them spent as the fabric manager . It was a fun job and my manager and I got to go to fabrics shows and pick fabrics for our store. I also had a say in who was hired for my dept. Wish they had not gone out of business.

buckeyequilter
March 29th, 2015, 09:37 AM
I've been following this thread and it's quite interesting.

Let's put ourselves behind that counter......you have the customer that wants to be treated like an old friend and you have the customer that wants to be left alone to shop. Someone comes in for the first time so what do you do? Most of the small shops I go in greet me and say if you need any help let me know....then they leave me alone unless I ask for help. I find that I run into more rude shoppers than I do workers.

I have found the workers are more than willing to help all you have to do is ask.

MayinJerset
March 29th, 2015, 09:44 AM
LQS closing after 2 yrs and mainly because of owner. No, " Hi let me know if you need help" from her or salesgals when you came in and when I asked the owner for her Row by Row Experience pattern (which was supposed to be free) she nodded to her pattern on the wall with the price for her kit. Turned down invitations to attend my guild's meetings, sent a salesclerk to tell us about the shop and then told me that lack of support from my guild made her shop fail. Sorry lady your sour personality did it.

TheYarnmaiden
March 29th, 2015, 09:53 AM
When I first moved to Austin a decade ago I went into all the close to home quilt stores. And I very likely won't try going again for years yet. I didn't go in with expectations beyond general politeness.
I guess I don't look like a quilter? One place thought I wouldn't notice that they were discussing shorting me on fabric while they were shadowing me like I was going to stuff bolts into my sweater (I said "good morning" when I walked in because I was excited and wanted to get elbows deep into my new happy hobby... and got a cold glare in response)... the one recommended to me for machine services didn't even dust out my serger when I took it in for a tune up and held the machine (which at the time I needed for my home business) hostage without ever doing the work they were charging me for (I've learned to do all my own machine repair now but this was 10yrs ago) and another told me not to bother signing up for a beginners class (the first little shop I'd seen with a bulletin board of classes. It looked amazing and like so much fun.) since whatever garment experience I might have would be irrelevant.
It was a lot like being 12 again and finding my first brick and mortar comic book shop... It didn't matter that I wanted to buy books and cards and had saved every dollar I could get my lawn mowing babysitting lemonade stand grabby paws on and knew what I wanted because I'd been reading my cousin's collection for years... I wasn't welcome, and have never been able to push through that and inflict my presence on people who make it clear they'd rather I not exist. Thank goodness for the internet.

If I need to pick something up in person I'm happier at Joann's, even though the fabric isn't as nice, nobody there has ever made me feel like I was trying to elbow my way into a high school lunch table clique.

What happened at the stores, has fed into my generalized fear of trying to be a part of any of the local quilt guilds. I have no way to know if it's just Austin. It took me years to get over thinking I probably couldn't learn to quilt and try this fun thing I wanted to do. =P

ugh.. I want to support local small business. I know how hard it is to be a tiny storefront. But, when it comes to quilting idk that I can. Maybe someday.

tnmtgrl
March 29th, 2015, 09:57 AM
Wow!!! That took some nerve on her part Mayinjerset!!! :icon_stunned:

Snip Snip
March 29th, 2015, 10:27 AM
In answer to the question whether men would walk out of a store if he were ignored: My husband did. He went into a gun shop with money to burn. The two workers there not only ignored him, they were gossiping and making vulgar comments about a customer who had just left the store. All the while smoking cigarettes and fouling the air. Hubs knew the owner, and was sorely tempted to contact him about the poor attitude of the employees, but didn't. And he hasn't gone back.

Midge
March 29th, 2015, 11:15 AM
Midge, I do think it is a woman thing. Sorry if that upsets you. I do not think you would find a similar proportion of men who would leave a store simply because they were not greeted upon entering it, and even far less who would never go back for the same reason.

I don't expect a greeting when I enter, and I don't think it's rude to not track every customer down and greet them.

I'm curious, is this just a LQS thing? Would you walk out of other stores if not greeted upon entry? A grocery mart? A liquor store? A library? Is this just small stores? Or does it go for large stores as well?

Why is leaving a customer alone until they ask for help considered rude?

Kaydee, if basic courtesy is a woman thing, I guess I have to own it then and I also view it as a good thing, not something to snark about. Sorry if it offends you, but I don't hold up men's behavior as the standard to judge my actions and preferences by. In most shopping situations, courtesy is a condition for me to hand over money. In my post I was speaking of objecting to deliberately rude behavior and being completely ignored or treated as an interloper. Perhaps don't read such black and white interpretations into my and others' posts. Deliberately rude clerks that ignore customers and intrusive fawning over customers are equally bad in my view. I didn't say I wanted to be fawned over, just offered basic courtesy.

But since you ask, I do expect to be treated well at other stores I return to regularly. Return to and regularly being the operative words. I shop at 2 grocers, one a local family owned chain of very high quality and somewhat higher prices, and another family owned stand alone grocer. Both nice places to visit, too. I also shop at Cleveland's wonderful West Side Market, an old fashioned city market where the owners are in the booths and greet you by name if you are regulars, and in a friendly way if you are not. And the atmosphere and quality are wonderful, so I'm willing to drive there and put up with the tight urban parking situation. Here in Ohio liquor stores can be inside grocery stores. And the clerks are not rude at the one I go to. And yes, at the library I am greeted when I enter, and they do know me. I see others being acknowledged, maybe not by name, but at least their existence within the space of the library. I have walked out of car dealerships because of rude treatment of women. I don't mind shopping for clothes at Macy's or Dillards where you can't find a clerk except at the register. But I prefer Nordstroms or Saks. And I more frequently shop at boutiques, some chains and some independents. Service counts at these places. And having shopped with my businessman ex for many years, the clerks in men's suits in department stores and in men's boutiques are all about service and very quickly come to know you. So it's not all about gender.

Heard the business adage "price, quality, service - you can have two"? As far as I can tell in this discussion no one has said that personal service is always the deal maker or deal breaker. I suspect we all shop at a variety of types of stores with a variety of goals. A customer decides what is important and makes spending decisions accordingly. If someone thinks price is the most important consideration, by all means, go for it. But there is nothing wrong with deciding service is very important in a shopping situation and making decisions accordingly. It's great to have the options available.

Claire OneStitchAtATime
March 29th, 2015, 12:23 PM
I don't want to get into a snippy conversation -- but it's worth remembering here that the OP, DramaMama, is talking about a store in the Midwest, and in the Midwest, it is considered polite and normal for you to be greeted when you walk into a store. DramaMama is totally right that by local norms, greeting a customer is polite. I live in the Midwest now, but I didn't grow up here, and although I prefer to be left to browse for a while, I can totally see that anyone who grew up in the Midwest with Midwestern manners would consider the F&P sale people rude. So while being greeted isn't *my* preference, I do think DramaMama is right about what counts as polite in Iowa, where she was shopping!

Mpyles
March 29th, 2015, 12:59 PM
LQS closing after 2 yrs and mainly because of owner. No, " Hi let me know if you need help" from her or salesgals when you came in and when I asked the owner for her Row by Row Experience pattern (which was supposed to be free) she nodded to her pattern on the wall with the price for her kit. Turned down invitations to attend my guild's meetings, sent a salesclerk to tell us about the shop and then told me that lack of support from my guild made her shop fail. Sorry lady your sour personality did it. the patterns are free...the kits are not, at least that's the way I understood it.

DramaMama
March 29th, 2015, 01:53 PM
I don't want to get into a snippy conversation -- but it's worth remembering here that the OP, DramaMama, is talking about a store in the Midwest, and in the Midwest, it is considered polite and normal for you to be greeted when you walk into a store. DramaMama is totally right that by local norms, greeting a customer is polite. I live in the Midwest now, but I didn't grow up here, and although I prefer to be left to browse for a while, I can totally see that anyone who grew up in the Midwest with Midwestern manners would consider the F&P sale people rude. So while being greeted isn't *my* preference, I do think DramaMama is right about what counts as polite in Iowa, where she was shopping!

Nice thought, Claire OneStitchAtATime -- never considered how geography may have played into my interpretation of or expectations in the treatment I received (or shall I say 'didn't receive').

That leads me to also realize: My expectations at both stores were high on the days I went as I 1) had just learned that they were w/in a short traveling distance from me, and 2) was hoping to return to both shops as a regular customer in the future.

Also note: I didn't expect to walk into these LQS and have a Missouri Star experience (that so many people on the forum rave about), I did have some expectations w/ regards to courtesy before handing over my money.

Had I been traveling and stopped at a LQS (to browse or see what I may find on my trip) knowing I would probably not be able to ever return, I probably would have continued to browse and possibly buy something had I been treated the same way.

Psychology says: If you don't have expectations (of someone or something), you cannot be disappointed.

Not sure how realistic it is to not have expectations in life, but I think the psychology of disappointment is true.

I have enjoyed reading all of the replies here.

kaydee
March 29th, 2015, 02:49 PM
Kaydee, if basic courtesy is a woman thing, I guess I have to own it then and I also view it as a good thing, not something to snark about. Sorry if it offends you, but I don't hold up men's behavior as the standard to judge my actions and preferences by. In most shopping situations, courtesy is a condition for me to hand over money. In my post I was speaking of objecting to deliberately rude behavior and being completely ignored or treated as an interloper. Perhaps don't read such black and white interpretations into my and others' posts. Deliberately rude clerks that ignore customers and intrusive fawning over customers are equally bad in my view. I didn't say I wanted to be fawned over, just offered basic courtesy.

Midge, in my original post I addressed two things. First, I said I was SURPRISED by the number of posters who said they turned around and left a store and would never go back SOLELY because they were not greeted when they entered. The number of posters who agreed with that surprised me. I hypothesized that that might be more of a woman's reaction than a man's reaction to not getting a cheery greeting when entering a store. My "woman thing" comment went to that one reaction only, not to the reactions to any of the other rude behavior that you and others have addressed. Second, in a separate paragraph I did agree that I did not tolerate poor service which several other posters also mentioned.

I have not been "snarky" (though you have now twice accused me of doing so). I didn't say you wanted to be fawned over. I didn't say "basic courtesy" is a woman thing. I didn't suggest you hold men's behavior up as the standard to judge your actions and preferences.

I also didn't JUDGE what I perceive to be more of a woman's reaction to not being greeted. I didn't tell anyone to get over it, to get a life, to examine their own behavior or any other "snarky" type comment. I merely said I was SURPRISED.

I think you are reading way to much into my comment. I am, after all, a woman. I am not one that would tend to denigrate women. I am willing, however, to notice differences between the sexes, and I think perhaps this is one such example.

kensington
March 29th, 2015, 03:34 PM
I don't think you were snarky at all. I saw the comparison for what it was myself. I have yet to see a man go to Home depot and get offended if no one greeted him or even noticed him. My husband can shop in there all day and unless there is something he can't find on his own, he doesn't even notice if there are clerks about or not. LOL.

If he can't find something, and can't find someone to ask for it.. He might mention that they need more help. That is all. He goes and finds someone. I do believe that is a man thing generally. And women do seek to find a smile or a kind face when they shop. I get it.

Betsy D
March 29th, 2015, 05:02 PM
Please don't be offended but I think you are being too sensitive. I don't think they are rude, I think some store sales people just allow more independent browsing. Stop worrying about how the staff is acting. Look at what you want to, ask questions if needed, buy what you want.

Kajenkids
March 29th, 2015, 07:42 PM
the patterns are free...the kits are not, at least that's the way I understood it.
I went to a bunch of row by row stores last year. They are required to offer the pattern for free. But you have to stop by to get it. Kits are optional and at a price. I probably picked up 30 patterns last year moving from Georgia to Colorado :-)

Alpha O
March 29th, 2015, 08:34 PM
I really don't care if a sales clerk says hello or not. As long as they answer when asked a question and are reasonably agreeable about helping with some advice, that's enough. The one time I will walk out is if I hear any talk of any kind of discrimination.

I normally shop, pick up what I want. pay for it and leave.

Mpyles
March 29th, 2015, 08:52 PM
Midge, in my original post I addressed two things. First, I said I was SURPRISED by the number of posters who said they turned around and left a store and would never go back SOLELY because they were not greeted when they entered. The number of posters who agreed with that surprised me. I hypothesized that that might be more of a woman's reaction than a man's reaction to not getting a cheery greeting when entering a store. My "woman thing" comment went to that one reaction only, not to the reactions to any of the other rude behavior that you and others have addressed. Second, in a separate paragraph I did agree that I did not tolerate poor service which several other posters also mentioned.

I have not been "snarky" (though you have now twice accused me of doing so). I didn't say you wanted to be fawned over. I didn't say "basic courtesy" is a woman thing. I didn't suggest you hold men's behavior up as the standard to judge your actions and preferences.

I also didn't JUDGE what I perceive to be more of a woman's reaction to not being greeted. I didn't tell anyone to get over it, to get a life, to examine their own behavior or any other "snarky" type comment. I merely said I was SURPRISED.

I think you are reading way to much into my comment. I am, after all, a woman. I am not one that would tend to denigrate women. I am willing, however, to notice differences between the sexes, and I think perhaps this is one such example.

Agree totally! You were only offering your interpretation and observation! Which you are entitled to! I, as many of you know work as a restaurant manager..in a quick dine restaurant. I greet everyone that walks thru our door if I am up there. You would be surprise in a day how many guest don't even acknowledge I have said hello. Sometimes it makes it really hard to offer that friendly hello.

MayinJerset
March 29th, 2015, 10:11 PM
the patterns are free...the kits are not, at least that's the way I understood it.

That's what I thought also but she walked away and never gave me the free pattern.

quiltlady60
March 30th, 2015, 02:22 PM
I experienced the same thing a few weeks ago. I traveled to a shop less than an hour from me, but it is really out of my way in Dade City,FL. No one spoke to me except an older gentleman who was waiting on his wife. It seemed everyone was needed to help her select fabrics for her project.
I will not go back.

However, I did find a nice shop in Zephyrhills, Fl. Very friendly and helpful. I have started one of their BOM and look forward to working with them.

I guess we just have to find those shops with friendly people who want their shops to be successful and then shop with them.

mahvelous mary
March 30th, 2015, 04:27 PM
Iwent to a LQS when I started quilting..everyone was pleasant and helpful except the owner! I spent $1000 over 2 month period purchasing tools, fabric,patterns and classes. The shop was only 3 miles from my home and I loved learning about quilting. One day I ran over there to pick up fabric to match an old piece and the owner ridiculed me in front of the entire store because I had brought in something from a different store. I was so hurt I walked out and never went back. I now drive 10 miles to a wonderful LQS but I have to admit I was worried that all quilt shops would be like that! I do like purchasing online but enjoy the personal touch at the new shop too.

scooter15650
March 30th, 2015, 06:23 PM
I guess I have been very lucky in my shopping for fabric. I live in western Pa and have always had a wonderful experience when stopping at different shops. Everyone said hello when I came in and said if I needed any help let them know. They didn't follow me around or stare at me. More then once they asked if I needed help with any thing. When spring comes we have several shop hops going on and everyone makes sure you get your free pattern and if you want the kit they have it available. Meeting other quilters on the hops is wonderful. They greet you and ask which shops you had been at and where they were so you can compare notes on all the fabric you bought. We just finished a Cookie Cruise shop hop last week where every shop (which there was 8) gave you a cookie and receipe from their shop and you registered for prizes. Every one said they were all getting fat eating all the cookies. I hope everyone who has had a bad experience doesn't give up on trying new shops. Their are some really great ones out there. Being nice and saying hello doesn't take much time and makes sure you will have a repeat customer.

lourixe
March 30th, 2015, 06:23 PM
I would say it is reasonable to expect a customer to return to a shop if he/she has had a pleasant experience there in his/her previous visit. It is not only a matter of courtesy. Of the LQS I know, one is owned and attended to by a young lady who tends to whine all the time. She has beautiful fabric, she is helpful if you need it, but her conversation is painful. In another LQS the owner looks down on you like she is really bestowing you a favour for aknowledging you are there. The prices of these two shops tend to be also higher. I might buy from them, but as a last resource. I don't feel at ease, I don't enjoy even just browsing.
On the other hand, I was very agreably surprised from the very first time I visited a third shop, although it is farther for me, in the heart of the snobbiest shopping area downtown. Maybe because I didn't have expectations about their friendliness -and I was conscious my attire was beneath their other costumers' present. I was made feel welcome to the place, though, and even to the conversation, was given valuable advice, was shown things and answered questions beyond all I could hope for. This is a place I'll never hesitate returning to.

Altairss
March 30th, 2015, 06:40 PM
Like a few mentioned a little courtesy goes a long way. Sometimes we all have a bad day or have just had a bad experience with a customer. But courtesy should never ever be forgotten. I was taught a long time ago to always greet my customers with minimum a smile and eye contact. Then I usually if with another customer offer I will be with you shortly or some such so they know I will help them as soon as I can or at least the offer is there. Many times customers will not even acknowledge you but the offer is there and you have done your job.
I always find that I go back to places that are pleasant to shop with and find myself avoiding any place that I feel is rude. I do give second chances but seldom thirds. Interesting and somehow frightening how many people here have had such unpleasant experiences. So far with the lQS I have had stellar luck and count my blessings.

Sandy Navas
March 30th, 2015, 08:00 PM
It sure doesn't get any better than walking down the street in a 'strange' town and having the CEO of a company yell across the street: "Happy Birthday, Sandy". Now that's special.

MargaretJoy
March 30th, 2015, 10:49 PM
I had the opportunity to shop in a quilt shop in Kindersley, Saskatchewan, Canada. It is a wonderful store. The only thing that would make it better is if it was closer to my home. It it over a two hour drive to go there, but I will definitely be shopping there again.

kensington
March 30th, 2015, 10:49 PM
It sure doesn't get any better than walking down the street in a 'strange' town and having the CEO of a company yell across the street: "Happy Birthday, Sandy". Now that's special.

Or to stop right on the street and give you a big ole hug because she knows you have recently gone through a very rough time. (((Jenny)))

shermur
March 31st, 2015, 08:16 AM
When I lived in Lee's Summit, Missouri, there was one local quilt store and many other choices to buy fabric. The LQS was high dollar, and I didn't feel welcomed when I went into the store. My favorite place to buy my fabrics? A woman with vision started a store called Fabric Recycles. It started with the abundance of fabric that was owned by her mother who had passed away. You were not only greeted, but an interest was taken in what project(s) you were working on and they would even help with fabric selection if it was available. Great prices, great attitudes and I miss that store. And of course, ordering on -line from M* gratifies me very well!

Alpha O
March 31st, 2015, 08:55 AM
It sure doesn't get any better than walking down the street in a 'strange' town and having the CEO of a company yell across the street: "Happy Birthday, Sandy". Now that's special.

I'd want to kill anyone who did that. My personal info is my own and not to be shared. I don't want to discuss my kid, your kids, your husband. I will complain if mine is being excessively stupid. I will discuss pets.

Sandy Navas
March 31st, 2015, 10:07 AM
I'd want to kill anyone who did that. My personal info is my own and not to be shared. I don't want to discuss my kid, your kids, your husband. I will complain if mine is being excessively stupid. I will discuss pets.

Sorry, but it was truly special!!

BobW
March 31st, 2015, 11:51 AM
I'd want to kill anyone who did that. My personal info is my own and not to be shared. I don't want to discuss my kid, your kids, your husband. I will complain if mine is being excessively stupid. I will discuss pets.

I am one who doesn't celebrate my own birthday. I gave up years ago and it isn't because I'm trying to stay young. For many years I didn't get to celebrate my birthday until several days after so my birthday kind of lost the special feeling. But I wouldn't be upset if someone yelled across the street happy birthday. I have a 86 year old neighbor that "Flamingo's" my front yard every year on my birthday. Just so you know "Flamingoing" is the act of placing somewhere around 50 plastic pink flamingos in my front yard during the night time so that when I get up on my birthday the flamingos are there. I laugh and the entire neighborhood knows it is my birthday since she also puts a sign that says Happy Birthday Bob.

I agree that if someone yelled health information or banking info I'd be upset, but someone wishing me a happy day, special or otherwise is something to be thankful for. If they didn't like and care for you they wouldn't make the effort. JMHO!

PS: I also think that wanting to kill someone is an excessive reaction to just about any situation short of the person you want to kill is trying to kill you. Again JMHO!

Cathy F
March 31st, 2015, 12:07 PM
I have two quilt stores near me, one I don't frequent much anymore after it was sold. The new owner does not make you feel welcome and I have to ask someone to cut my fabric even though they see I've finished shopping and have my things on the cutting table waiting for them.
The other quilt shop is my favorite and I'm in there often. I've been going to that shop for at least 20 years. They are friendly, knowledgeable, and encouraging. I love taking classes there and I'm always made to feel welcome. Last year I was ill and they hadn't seen me in a while, I went in and they said "were your ears ringing we were just talking about you. We've been wanting to give you a call to see if you were alright". They just moved their shop and now it's even closer to me, can't wait to go over and see it!

Patty J
March 31st, 2015, 09:30 PM
I just mentioned in another post about how very lucky I am to live within 10 miles of the best LQS ever. The owner, a man, always greets us with a smile and a kind word. If you are bringing a machine in with you he helps you carry it. Fixes my machines in a very short period of time and always always stands behind his services. If your not happy with anything in the shop he makes the effort to correct it. I've never had a problem, but someone else did. He even did an emergency machine repair for a lady from another state the very day she brought her machine in. I know that I'm blessed. I tell him all the time about the good things going on in his shop. So he knows he is appreciated.

sewluvit
March 31st, 2015, 09:53 PM
I had the opportunity to shop in a quilt shop in Kindersley, Saskatchewan, Canada. It is a wonderful store. The only thing that would make it better is if it was closer to my home. It it over a two hour drive to go there, but I will definitely be shopping there again.

Margaret, I also live over 2 hrs from Kindersley, Saskatchewan near Saskatoon. I have heard they have a wonderful quilt shop there and plan to find out this summer!

Sherri6474
March 31st, 2015, 11:58 PM
I was out with my DD and grandkids this afternoon. DGD needed to go the bathroom and DD stopped at gas station. Right next store was a quilt shop!! I was so excited to find a new one. I walked in with DGS and the owner's did not bother to look up from what they were doing. I even said "Hello!" and was still ignored. DGS and I looked around a few moments and left. I will not waste my time stopping there again. I would love to support LQS but their attitudes need to change. Every customer should be greeted with a simple hello. Especially if you are the ONLY customer in their small store. I will continue to buy online because 99.9% of the time, I get a sweet handwritten note thanking me for my purchase.

AlohaSandy
April 1st, 2015, 12:44 AM
So I've read 3 pages of complaints of bad customer service what I don't understand is why don't you just tell them that they are being rude or call them and speak to the manager or owner. I never let bad customer service go unmentioned how are they going to know otherwise. Or post on their FB page, twitter, Instagram or their website. I did that recently with Pandora and let me tell you that i am sure glad I did. IMO

TracyInBoise
April 1st, 2015, 01:28 AM
So, I don't post an awful lot on here, but I do enjoy reading the posts and have found the helpful, friendly interaction amongst members to be delightful. I thought about replying to this post a couple of days ago, then decided against it, but tonight I feel compelled to post about how terribly, terribly sad I find this post to be. You see, I actually work in a fabulous LQS. I have a 'real' life and a 'real' business to run, but feel quite privileged to be able to work at my favorite LQS for a couple of days a week. I was a very satisfied customer and student prior to becoming an employee. Our shop feels like family - for employees as well as customers. It really is my happy place - a statement echoed by many, many others. I wish all of you were able to have that same experience at your own LQSs. That said, I always check out the LQS when we travel and I recognize that many are not as friendly/well-stocked/inviting as my own. However, this applies to all sorts of businesses - restaurants, department stores, grocers, mechanics, etc. I think it is a bit unfair to generalize the LQS community as a result of one's experiences with a few poorly-run businesses. Please keep searching - you're bound to find one of the 'special' ones sooner or later!

DramaMama
April 1st, 2015, 03:02 AM
I think it is a bit unfair to generalize the LQS community as a result of one's experiences with a few poorly-run businesses. Please keep searching - you're bound to find one of the 'special' ones sooner or later!

While I don't think anyone has generalized and thrown all LQS into the "bad experience" category (I noted two particular stores, for example), it is interesting how many people have had such experiences (and from a mom and pop type business, nonetheless).

I would LOVE to still be able to find something closer to home to support. Until then, it's online shopping and trips to M* for me!

Appreciate your post.

Quiltfreestyle
April 1st, 2015, 03:08 AM
I kind of feel like Tracy from Boise. It's really sad that so many here have had bad experiences at their LQS. I've posted before about how lucky I feel to have so many options where I live, 4 quilt stores within 30 minutes drive not to mention a new Hobby Lobby & 2 Joann's stores. If I want to drive a hour I can hit another 6 or 7 stores, one upside to living in a big city...
Ive only had one less than enjoyable experience at one of the stores, the clerk wasn't very pleasant. It didn't stop me from going back, cuz they have an incredible selection. The next time I went the clerk was very nice, so I guess she was just having a bad day before. i go to these stores often. Enough that I've made friends with the people there so now it's always a fun time.