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brook
February 13th, 2015, 03:41 AM
I have a part time job where I teach quilting and sewing. My frustration is having a time limit for people to learn how to do something new to them. i.e....I had one hour tonight to teach 3 people how to make a mug rug. So they were learning how to cut fabric with a rotary cutter (sharing 2 mats). Then cut their fabric into 4 different sizes. Then cut their lining 2 different sizes. Then cut their batting. Then cut out 2 templates two different sizes. Mark the lining with the templates. Sew lining onto fabric. Cut the back of the lining just big enough to get the right side on the outside of each square. Place them on the mug rug, Iron them down. zig zag the edges. Then put the batting, backing and top together. Turn the layers right side out and top stitch the edges. :icon_shake:

So, is there anyone here that could do that in an hour if you had never used a rotary cutter or a sewing machine? I think this might get done in 3 hours but not one. I feel bad when my students walk away with a partially finished project and a puzzled look. I wish they could just stay until they're done so that they can feel successful and good about what they made.

Thanks for letting me share.

mommamarsh
February 13th, 2015, 04:11 AM
No way could I do that in an hour . Most of the classes I've taken here are 4 hour timeslots . And most of the other folks are way faster than me / more experienced .

Sylvia H
February 13th, 2015, 04:23 AM
You are very correct that 1 hour is not enough time to make a mug rug if the students don't even know how to use a rotary cutter. I can understand how frustrating that is for you.

A LQS had a monthly class to make mug rugs. They scheduled 2 hours a class, but there was prework to prepare for the class. And I think if there were any new quilters, they helped them with the prep before the classes.

Any chance you can discuss this with the shop owner? Perhaps you can create an outline of what can be done within a 1, 2 and 3 hour framework? I am a retired corporate trainer, and I understand how much has to go into creating a good class for adult learners.

kimsophia
February 13th, 2015, 05:44 AM
So, is there anyone here that could do that in an hour if you had never used a rotary cutter or a sewing machine? I think this might get done in 3 hours but not one. I feel bad when my students walk away with a partially finished project and a puzzled look. I wish they could just stay until they're done so that they can feel successful and good about what they made.

Thanks for letting me share.

Wait--they don't even know how to use a sewing machine??? It took a good part of a semester of home ec to learn that in high school...

rebeccas-sewing
February 13th, 2015, 06:39 AM
That's crazy, Coleen!!! I think you need to discuss this with the people in charge. If students walk away feeling like they didn't accomplish the project, word will get around that the class is not worth taking. Hopefully, if you tell them the class won't thrive based on this fact, they will extend the classroom time. If the students don't even know how to use a sewing machine they shouldn't be allowed to sign up for the class. Do they have a class set up for learning how to use a sewing machine? If not, I would think it would benefit the shop to set up a class for basic sewing machine use. The class you're teaching should be for those who sew but want to learn how to make quilted items.

You've received some good info. from some other posts here. You should share with your shop what others are doing and how long their sessions last.

Iris Girl
February 13th, 2015, 06:42 AM
That is craziness. When I was teaching I did a 4 hour class each week. Some projects took 2 or even 3 classes. And most of my ladies were seasoned sewers.
You definitely need 2 to 3 hours for that class with beginners. I would say first a 2 to 3 hour class on how to use the rotary cutter and sewing machine as a pre-requisite.

Carlie Wolf
February 13th, 2015, 07:52 AM
That's just not feasible. I wouldn't teach for that shop because ultimately the way they have set it up is bad for their instructors and their customers. It doesn't help your reputation and in the long run will hurt your chances of teaching other places when customers go away unhappy. Often the customer doesn't realize that the problem is not the teachers ability but the shops disorganization. I think this is a case that you need to be clear to the shop what can and cannot be done within the time period they are allowing.

Midge
February 13th, 2015, 09:13 AM
How frustrating! I hope you can speak to the owner about more realistic time frames and learning objectives. I agree with the above comments about proper design of a learning activity being more complicated than it looks. I did a lot of staff development and lectures as an APN. It takes hours to set up classes correctly. And the students have to have the basic skills to be successful in a learning situation. And then not enough tools like mats at each station is just unacceptable. If the shop owner hopes the class will drive business to her, she is going about it the wrong way.

brook
February 14th, 2015, 03:51 AM
I wish I could talk to a person that could/would change the amount of time for my classes, but this is a corporation so I would have a few layers of people to go through to get there ( wherever there is).

Sylvia H
February 14th, 2015, 04:12 AM
I wish I could talk to a person that could/would change the amount of time for my classes, but this is a corporation so I would have a few layers of people to go through to get there ( wherever there is).A

As others have mentioned, keeping the class as it is - or other classes on the same level - will only decrease business for the store. Most managers do not want to hear about problems; they want to hear about solutions to problems. If you can bring to the person you report to, a solution to this problem, perhaps that person will take it up to the next level. That may be the best you can do in this situation. But if you do it, you will be demonstrating your commitment to delivering a good class.

rebeccas-sewing
February 14th, 2015, 07:20 AM
If you want to continue teaching these classes I think it would benefit you and the folks who sign up for the class if you figure out who is in charge. See if you can get an email address for that person and write to them explaining the problem. If you explain the problem and give a solution to the problem I would think they'd be willing to work with you to make a better class situation. If you do this you must be very clear and to the point. If it's just more time you need let them know. If they have picked the subject matter for the class and are not willing to budge on the time frame then provide them with a better course plan that will meet the time limit. Maybe it needs to be a class with more than one part to it. Only you know what would work best since we're only giving advice on a small amount of information.