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View Full Version : How to stop dog jumping



Hulamoon
January 29th, 2015, 08:31 PM
Puppy jumps everytime he sees me holding something. Coming in with grocieries, laundry, a bottle of lotion, lol I have been watching Youtube videos,but wanted to know what you have done. It seems small dogs are harder to train. I'm starting to get annoyed :icon_mooooh:

FabStripper
January 29th, 2015, 08:36 PM
Lol. I think he wants you to hold him. I think the only fix for this is to get another dog.

bubba
January 29th, 2015, 08:46 PM
I would hit them with my knee in their chest and firmly tell them no. They don't do it anymore. Also, when they greet people, they know if they want to be petted, they have to sit first and then they get petted. When they have to work for what they want, they are much better dogs. They have to sit before they can come in the house and also before they can eat.

Pandabear
January 29th, 2015, 08:47 PM
With my dogs its was easy enough to say No very firmly and move my body to the side so they couldn't jump at me. The other thing we did was tell them Sit, again firmly. If they comply them they get praise and a treat. My labs are food oriented and need it to 'get' their training.

We also use hand signals when we use voice commands. It seems to help reinforce the command for my guys. So a No will be accompanied by a flat hand, palm down in front of their face. For Sit we use a closed fist and swipe it over their head so their eyes follow it. As their eyes follow, their bottoms hit the floor.

Don't know if this will help, and I hope you can get the little guy to behave. Btw... We took ours to puppy training to learn how to train them. It really did help us.

Simply Quilting
January 29th, 2015, 08:48 PM
Not fun. The way that we were taught was to turn your body away from the dog and ignore him until he stops jumping. Once he has stopped then give him praise. Once in a while, I'm not where I can turn so I firmly say the word "Sit".

Doloris
January 29th, 2015, 08:50 PM
mine have to sit before they eat, go out, come in, and when people come in the house. They are jack russells and sometimes get a little hyper, but for the most part they behave well. A firm NO and SIT , and then when he does give him a small treat. He will learn if you keep at it. You will be surprised how fast he learns.

Divine Daisy
January 29th, 2015, 08:53 PM
don't make eye contact, turn your back and ignore. It works quite quickly

Carlie Wolf
January 29th, 2015, 09:07 PM
I've done the chest bumps which have been effective but I've mainly had larger dogs most my life and they trained very rapidly. Another thing that I found quite effective for puppies is what I call "Mommy's stupid". They love you, they think you are the most wonderful thing in the world so you have to plan this so "you" don't fall. Basically you bump into them, pretend trip on them, walk into them. Acted shocked because YOU didn't see them. You then pretend you didn't see them and you say oops,sorry, oh my anything that lets them know they really need to watch out for you because you are clumsy and a general clutz.

Other things I've seen others do is when they start jumping on you, you simply turn away from them. They don't get praise or attention when they do something annoying. My sister generally takes her pointer and next finger and gives her little dog a solid poke in the chest saying Ack. Maybe one of these will work for you. Puppies are annoying! The main thing is to do whatever it is consistently and that's the hardest part. What kind of puppy do you have?

Gina
January 29th, 2015, 09:18 PM
I would hit them with my knee in their chest and firmly tell them no. They don't do it anymore. Also, when they greet people, they know if they want to be petted, they have to sit first and then they get petted. When they have to work for what they want, they are much better dogs. They have to sit before they can come in the house and also before they can eat.
This is how we have trained every dog we have had. It is very effective!

Carrie J
January 29th, 2015, 09:41 PM
I would hit them with my knee in their chest and firmly tell them no. They don't do it anymore. Also, when they greet people, they know if they want to be petted, they have to sit first and then they get petted. When they have to work for what they want, they are much better dogs. They have to sit before they can come in the house and also before they can eat.

This method is the one I've used religiously with either small or large breeds. Manners first! They (puppies, rescues, etc) get it very quickly. When they do behave to either verbal or hand commands, liver treats are like cocaine for them. It's never failed for me.

Sandy Navas
January 29th, 2015, 09:48 PM
Professional dog trainers also recommend the knee to the chest. Works on mine!

Sylvia H
January 29th, 2015, 09:52 PM
In order to get a dog to stop doing something, you have to get them to do something else. That is why the "sit" command is a good one. Teach a solid "sit", and your dog will not jump because he is sitting.

The jumping is typical puppy behavior. What we expect our dogs to do is learn how to behave in a world that is quite contrary to the world their instincts prepare them for. I was not successful with the turning away or the bumping in the chest. By the time my "puppy" was doing that, he was already around 60 - 70 pounds! I had a difficult time while he was in that stage, but with perseverance and much time spent in training, he both learned his manners and outgrew his puppy ways. I was told to spend about 3 five minute training sessions a day on obedience work. That seemed to work for us.

I will proudly say that people who meet my dog are very impressed with how well behaved he is. All that early training time was well spent.

I was not good at that time with clicker training, but I used the word "yes" every time he followed a command. And during training, it was "yes" and a treat. What is good about this is later, if I was without treats, the "yes" was still a good reinforcement for wanted behavior.

Midge
January 29th, 2015, 10:05 PM
Very hard training young puppies. You must first train *yourself*. 1) To be patient. 2) To never accidentally reinforce a "bad" behavior. 3) To always reinforce desired behaviors. Training a dog is mostly training yourself.

I always had larger hunting type dogs until this rescued cocker spaniel, who knew absolutely nothing of what people wanted of him when I got him. He was so afraid of everything and everyone that out of desperation I decided to try the clicker method of training. OMG does he love that clicker. He is much better now. Lots of YouTube videos on how to use a clicker to train a dog humanely.

It bears repeating. Your most important task is training yourself to respond consistently.

GuitarGramma
January 29th, 2015, 10:06 PM
Lorie, I just read that you've broken your wrist. I'm so sorry to hear this, and I hope you heal up quickly.

I don't know if this will work with your hand out of commission, but the other trick I use is to hold my hands splayed out like two fans touching each other. I put my hands right in front of the dog's nose. My hands sort of form a wall, and the dog really can't jump. Combining that with a sit command would probably be a powerful combination. My trick may have to wait until your wrist heals, or maybe the cast will make it work extra well!

Kgrammiecaz
January 29th, 2015, 10:07 PM
My daughter and I did puppy training with her two little ones. They did great, learned quickly (and so did we) and had fun as well. I am not comfortable with any kind of hitting or poking, etc. i certainly would not want my boss hitting me to teach me something and we never hit our kids to teach them. Just to be clear, I also do not judge anyone for what they do as its none of my business. Just saying my recommendations and the training we went through did not support that style of teaching

You will figure it out with yours as to what works best. Puppies are like an infant. Unconditional love and they depend on us for everything.

Bubby
January 29th, 2015, 10:18 PM
I just give my dogs a firm "NO" a couple of times and it has worked. The knee in the chest also works and I used it when I had pitbulls. The knee doesn't hurt them, it just stops them and pushes them down. You are just raising your knee as a barrier, not striking the pup with it.

auntiemern
January 29th, 2015, 10:29 PM
Take him to obedience school.

Hulamoon
January 29th, 2015, 10:32 PM
yeah the cast isn't helping. He only knows sit so far when getting a treat and I try to get down low for that,even then he is too excited. When I put my hand in a stop motion he just thinks i'm playing. The jumping is a dance around me and any chance to knee him is impossible. It's time for school I think.

Thanks for all the input :)

bakermom
January 29th, 2015, 10:42 PM
Not fun. The way that we were taught was to turn your body away from the dog and ignore him until he stops jumping. Once he has stopped then give him praise. Once in a while, I'm not where I can turn so I firmly say the word "Sit".

This was the way we taught our Lab. It really didn't yake long for her to figure it out

RhondaRae
January 29th, 2015, 11:05 PM
A method I got from Cesare on tv is to walk into the dog making them back up. It worked on my dog when nothing else would. You are in effect taking back your space and making them back down. I dont say anything. body language is more effective if you are not talking.

I also taught my dog the command back. and when she is excitedly greeting me I command her to back up. I do it with a hand signal I taught her. Basically I say back and point where I want her to go and then all I have to do the next time is point and she gets it.

HandsOffItsMine
January 29th, 2015, 11:09 PM
No way to knee Chloe, her chest is about 5-6" off the ground. :P She'll sit for a treat. The peeps do ok with her but sometimes when she gets really excited to see them, her nails will scare the 2 little ones.

It's the barking that we need to work on, Oy, she'll bark at a gnat that isn't there! lol Trying the "No Bark" with a hand motion, that works about 1/3 of the time.

I need to find a "training" course for her and I, or a crash course for the 3 of us soon.

Maybe we need to make a Puppy/Doggie Group to share tips. :)

Ahamblin
January 30th, 2015, 01:28 AM
Check out Leerburg Dog Training | 17,500 pages of dog training information, 750 free dog training streaming videos, free eBooks, podcasts, by Ed Frawley and Michael Ellis (http://www.leerburg.com) and Michael Ellis. He is a wonderful trainer and there are a lot of free videos on early training. Also Joann Fleming has some great books. Be careful about a lot of the youtube stuff. Most of the people have no idea how to train. When looking for classes make sure that they use positive reinforcement methods in the sessions. Especially with young dogs. You both will be much happier with the results. Having a puppy is a lot of work but so rewarding.