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kaydee
November 19th, 2014, 12:24 PM
Can anyone recommend a "soft" but not outrageously expensive yarn? Something around the $12.00 range is ok. The $26.00+ price is too high.

My daughter is just starting to knit, and she wants to make a scarf for her boyfriend, but the yarn store near her university does not have the color she is looking for. She is currently using Berroco Alpaca for another scarf, and she says that is "soft".

She is going to be home for a couple of days over Thanksgiving but we will have limited time to shop, and I thought perhaps I could narrow down the stores we hit by doing a little pre-shopping over the phone. I just don't know which brands are "soft". (She is one of those people that have a high tactile sensitivity and "softness" is a must.)

Thanks for any help you can give me!

p.s. This is the color she is looking for, but we can't order it b/c she can't be sure it is soft. https://www.etsy.com/listing/109947462/persimmon-orange-yarn-hand-dyed?ref=market

Sonic
November 19th, 2014, 12:43 PM
I get it. I shop for yarns by feel first, then by color and size.

Usually anything that is called "Superfine" alpaca or "Baby" alpaca will be super soft as the hair diameter is tiny, thus why it feels soft. Some of the alpaca blends are also very soft if made by a more fiber conscious brand, not a chain brand like Bernat.

The loft or fluffiness of any given yarn can be surmised by the weight (size/thickness) of a yarn and is usually listed as:
Sport weight (thinner)
Worsted (medium weight)
Bulky (thick/full)
However thick does not always equal soft. It just gives you an idea if you are calling around or looking online.

Some sheep wools are very soft, some not. Those are the ones you really need to touch to be sure.
If the garment will be washed a lot, that needs to be taken into consideration. Superwash wools are not supposed to shrink, but regular wools and alpaca fibers will shrink and felt in the regular wash.

Not sure if synthetic fibers would interest her. They are durable and more washable than wools and wool blends....and can rival some of the softest yarns out there.
Lion Brand yarns have some really nice bulky and soft yarns that can often be found in the craft section of Walmart. Many chain fabric stores like Joanne's also have a large yarn section.

Bubby
November 19th, 2014, 12:56 PM
Some of the larger WalMart stores have pretty good yarn sections. I would look there first and see if they have what you are looking for. Read the descriptions of the characteristics of the yarn on the labels.

Claire OneStitchAtATime
November 19th, 2014, 01:05 PM
I'm don't know, but I also love soft! Merino mixes, especially merino from New Zealand, are often a good bet.

bubba
November 19th, 2014, 02:40 PM
Check this site. I have bought yarn from them and it is everything as advertised! They are part of the company that owns Connecting Threads.

KnitPicks.com : Knitting Supplies, Knitting Yarn, Books, Patterns, Needles & Accessories (http://www.knitpicks.com/)

songbird857
November 19th, 2014, 06:25 PM
May I suggest any yarn labeled as 'sock' yarn? They knit up into beautiful scarves, and because they really are marketed to those who want to make socks, they tend to have a nice feel :) Something with bamboo or alpaca or merino...
The other alternative would be merino worsted weight - less of a 'fuzzy' look and feel, more of a 'neat' knit look if that makes any sense, and a pleasure to knit with. May be a good choice for a new knitter. This is a good yarn from a shop near me (you can get it elsewhere too) - huge store and has wonderful yarns - I'm lucky to have it so close.Madelinetosh Tosh Vintage Yarn at WEBS | Yarn.com (http://www.yarn.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/product.detail/categoryID/EC89E105-48C4-423E-A735-541225044464/productID/1CAD421E-A570-474A-BBCF-03E6BAA4487F/) good 'guy' color too...
just had a thought - WEBS has some of the nicest people that work for them - If you call them, they can definitely point you in the right direction for your pricepoint.