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HandsomeRyan
June 30th, 2014, 04:03 PM
My wife and I are trying to make some changes [read: going out to eat less] for nutritional and economic reasons. One of the ideas we're looking at is to cook larger batches of some of the foods we enjoy and then portion them out into smaller individual servings which can be frozen in our chest freezer then reheated when taken to work for lunches or used as a quick "We're both tired and don't feel like cooking" meal at the end of the day. eg. baked spaghetti, rice and beans, meatloaf and mashed potatoes. I'm looking for opinions on the various food storage containers out there.

Ziploc, GladWare, IKEA... It seems like there are a multitude of choices at different price points. We've used some of the ziploc containers and been pretty happy with them. We have some of the IKEA (the opaque white with red/translucent lids) stuff which we like but it is expensive and stains pretty easily with tomato based stuff. I've not used gladware before but it looks to be comparable to the ziploc stuff.

So- If you wanted to make some meals ahead, have the ability to transport them to work, and not break the bank on the initial purchase, what would you recommend? Ideas, suggestions, pros, cons, any input welcome.

Bubby
June 30th, 2014, 04:20 PM
There are some Rubbermaid containers that look clear on the bottom (like glass and mine have a swirl design that looks etched in) that have lids with a see-through window in the top. These containers don't stain from tomato sauce based foods. They can break if you drop them the wrong way. You can freeze and cook in the microwave with good results. I bought ours at Walmart. I have no experience with Ikea containers. I don't find Ziploc or Glad containers to be airtight enough and our food gets a good amount of frost when used in the freezer.

I love your concept of cooking ahead and I did this for years when I was till working. It was especially useful when I lived single because I could never finish off a full batch of pasta or a roast, etc.

Dollyquilts
June 30th, 2014, 04:24 PM
Ryan, are you planning to warm the meals in the microwave at work? The Ziploc and GladWare are not suitable for warming, are they? Of course, you could take Corning to heat up the contents of the freezer containers.

I don't think you can get much cheaper than the Ziploc and Gladware stuff. We reuse those containers until they start to split. We also send food home with guests in them because it's no big deal if they don't get returned.

I see that Bubby says they are safe for microwave, but I don't trust the plastics industry with my health.

Dolly

RiverMomm
June 30th, 2014, 04:25 PM
You will love the savings with make ahead meals. I find we are much less likely to go out to dinner when there is something tastey and easy in the freezer. Now, we go out to dinner to have a romantic dinner out, instead of "We are hungry and tired -and no one wants to cook." I always cook more than I need for dinner and freeze for future lunches and dinners.

I have used several different plastic containers for the freezer. I think the I like the Rubermaid Take Aways better than the ziplock containers. Even though they take up a bit more room, the lids seem to hold up better. I have dropped my fair share of frozen entrees and the ziplock lids tend to break easier. And I feel the lids stay on better than the ziplock lids when packing the lunches in our bags.

I also like the Ziplock heavy duty freezer bags for sauces.

I am curious about the vacuum package machine thingy. Not sure if it is worth it but I would think it would be better for freezing meat.

Bubby
June 30th, 2014, 04:28 PM
I did not say the Ziploc and Gladware was safe for the microwave....I said the Rubbermaid containers I mentioned were safe.

Hulamoon
June 30th, 2014, 04:44 PM
I use the zip lock ones for freezing left over sauces and soups. I bought different sizes. I make my own crockpot beans and found that I like using the bags better now. I portion them out. stand them up in the freezer and then roll them up and put them all in another bag.

I love the glass bottom Rubermaid containers.

jsmetcalf
June 30th, 2014, 04:45 PM
How ironic is this thread. Just this morning I was cleaning out my freezer tossing numerous items that had freezer burn. Then I spent a fair amount of time reviewing the vacuum style sealers and have put one into my Amazon cart but not yet hit the buy button. I am tired on throwing away food. We raise a big garden each summer and although much of the crops are canned, I do freeze a fair amount. So...does anybody have one that they are happy with?

Angelia
June 30th, 2014, 04:47 PM
We use both the Ziplock and Glad freezer containers for this--my husband reheats in the microwave without any problems. My advice is try to stick with one brand--it is a real pain having to keep the lids straight since they aren't interchangable among brands!

RiverMomm
June 30th, 2014, 04:52 PM
How true!!!

We use both the Ziplock and Glad freezer containers for this--my husband reheats in the microwave without any problems. My advice is try to stick with one brand--it is a real pain having to keep the lids straight since they aren't interchangable among brands!

Cat77
June 30th, 2014, 05:01 PM
We use these (http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/60149673/)from Ikea and also some we bought at the supermarket (usually when it's 50% off). They are cheap and come in many different practical sizes. When they stain, we throw them out and buy new ones.

I use them for salads (bigger upstanding one for the salad, a smaller one with the selfmade dressing the night before, pack them matryoshka style, then mix before eating) and just buy a roll to go with it in a bakery. I also use it for pasta sauce or curry and then defreeze the evening before, cook pasta or rice when I'm cooking anyway and put them in the containers to take with me the next morning. In winter I buy veggies when they are on sale, make a huge bowl of soup and freeze it as well.

I'm not a fan of zip lock bags. My former flatmate used to use them, but they took up a lot of space in the freezer. They're very practical when you first freeze them 'cause you can basically stuff them in any little corner, but then they are in awkward shapes, which take up a lot of space once you move around/use up other frozen goods around them.

Lindagie
June 30th, 2014, 05:27 PM
I have a vacuum sealer thing and use it a lot for freezing many things. You don't get the freezer burn and the bags are very sturdy. You can vacuum seal things in the jars, although I haven't tried that yet. I freeze some items first on a tray (some fruits and veggies) and then vacuum seal so they won't get smashed. I did whole peaches though without a problem. I buy some meats in larger amts at Sam's Club and then individually seal steaks, chicken etc. and divide grd. round in 1# amts. I have more than gotten my money's worth out of mine.

Dollyquilts
June 30th, 2014, 05:36 PM
I know, but I only use glass in the microwave.

MRoy
June 30th, 2014, 05:36 PM
I am curious about the vacuum package machine thingy. Not sure if it is worth it but I would think it would be better for freezing meat.
I have a vacuum sealer and I really like it. I use it primarily for freezing meat. I buy pork loins on sale, have them sliced in the store, then seal and freeze meal-sized packages. I vacuum sealed packs of whole strawberries and froze them this year too. But the vacuum seal bags or rolls would be a little pricey for every-day use.

Dollyquilts
June 30th, 2014, 05:41 PM
Bubby, sorry. I see now where you said glass-bottom Rubbermaid. My DD and SIL use the pyrex rounds to take lunches to work. They have several sizes. The Rubbermaid glass storage containers are pricey for the initial investment, but they have good longevity if you don't drop them. And they don't cause cancer. Who can put a price on that?

irishrn
June 30th, 2014, 06:20 PM
I have the vacuum sealer and I'm on my second one since I used my first one to death!! It stopped sucking out the air!!
I freeze meat from the store on arrival home to make smaller portions. But (like today) I cooked up 6 large chicken breasts. Made chicken Parm with enough for dinner, then vacuum froze the other chicken in groups of chicken strips, nuggets and cutlets for another parm meal! Some things don't vacuum seal well like loaves of sliced Italian bread so I put them in ziplock freezer bags. But I've cooked a London broil to not quite done, sliced it and then made mini meals for another nite! Also cooked ground beef to add to a shepherds pie meal or red sauce. Lots of opportunity to plan ahead. PS you should not microwave food in ANY plastic container, only glass! The Chemical leaching into food from plastic is a known health issue!!! Enjoy!!!

Hulamoon
June 30th, 2014, 06:30 PM
I like my food sealer but havent been using it much. I buy fish that is pre frozen in sealed bags. You would think we would have more fresh fish here. It's so expensive! I was thinking of geting rid of my microwave. I hardly use it and the turntable doesn't work.

My favorite appliance is my toaster oven. I can cook a potato in it. :D

Racing Nana
June 30th, 2014, 06:31 PM
We have a vacuum sealer bag thingy, and it works like a charm for meats, veggies.
I would advise against using anything liquid with them though as the vacuum thing sucks out fluids so you would end up sealing an empty bag and have a really big mess. lol

A ziplock back inside the vacuum-sealer bag would work though.

We buy our meats in bulk family packs or Costco and then freeze in the proportions we need. It really works for us with holding off freezer burn.

My $.02 CDN.

tamsterg7
June 30th, 2014, 06:34 PM
I like ziplock. Also, I would recommend a great book - 'Freezer Pleasers' (I think I bought it on Amazon). The recipe is for 2 or 3 or whatever you are cooking. Have dinner for the night, and 2 for later. I use it when I am going on a business trip to make ahead for my DH and DS. The recipes are quite good, but you can always adjust to personal taste. I make quiche, lasagna, casseroles etc., and tape the baking diretions to the lids. Then I make a list for the fridge door which tells them what to get out the night before, baking instructions (redundant, I know), etc. They eat so well when I am gone that they don't seem to miss me!

HandsomeRyan
June 30th, 2014, 06:38 PM
Popular topic!

We have a vacuum sealer which we use sometimes but it won't help with lunches since we can't heat-n-eat out of them.

The ziploc containers are microwavable. I understand some people are not comfortable heating things in plastic containers which is fine but until I see an independent peer-reviewed scientific journal article stating otherwise I'll take my chances that it is reasonably safe.

Wwena
June 30th, 2014, 07:13 PM
If I bring food to work, I keep it in a container, typically the IKEA one you describe. Lots of people use the same or like so it makes for easy stacking in the fridge. If I brought frozen food I'd leave it out (at my desk) to have it thaw a bit before putting it in the microwave. If many have frozen food there might be a line of people waiting to heat their food at lunchtime lol.

I use plastic bags for small portions, such as bolognese and usually boil pasta the same day I will eat it. I'd either use a ziplock bag (but as they often get thrown out I think THEY are expensive!) or a regular bag (small freezer plastic bag) with a plastic clip to keep it shut.

You are on the right track, eating out will eat your money and you will have a hard time making good choices when it comes to eating healthy!

Oh by the way, I find potatoes don't freeze really well - it makes the starch in them turn into sugar to a degree, and it will taste bland or even sweet!

Spudgrandma
June 30th, 2014, 07:20 PM
I use the vacume sealer. If you have things that are liquid or soft freeze them first and then vacume them. I had a bunch of the plastic, square, flat shallow ziplock brand containers, I froze things that were liquid or soft in them first and then you can just pop them out and use the vacume sealer, they will stay in the freezer much longer and are easy to label and also see what is in them. Just wash your other containers and they are ready to do your pre-freeze for the next batch.

Hulamoon
June 30th, 2014, 07:28 PM
Anna you are so right about the potatos, even in soup. I made a batch of veggie soup and all the potatos became mushy when I thawed them.

I'm going to insert a great book here and I'll stick it down in yummy too.

366 Delicious Ways to Cook Pasta with Vegetables: Dolores Stewart Riccio: 9780452277274: Amazon.com: Books (http://www.amazon.com/Delicious-Ways-Cook-Pasta-Vegetables/dp/0452277272/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1404167141&sr=8-8&keywords=366+ways)

Mpyles
June 30th, 2014, 07:30 PM
My wife and I are trying to make some changes [read: going out to eat less] for nutritional and economic reasons. One of the ideas we're looking at is to cook larger batches of some of the foods we enjoy and then portion them out into smaller individual servings which can be frozen in our chest freezer then reheated when taken to work for lunches or used as a quick "We're both tired and don't feel like cooking" meal at the end of the day. eg. baked spaghetti, rice and beans, meatloaf and mashed potatoes. I'm looking for opinions on the various food storage containers out there.

Ziploc, GladWare, IKEA... It seems like there are a multitude of choices at different price points. We've used some of the ziploc containers and been pretty happy with them. We have some of the IKEA (the opaque white with red/translucent lids) stuff which we like but it is expensive and stains pretty easily with tomato based stuff. I've not used gladware before but it looks to be comparable to the ziploc stuff.

So- If you wanted to make some meals ahead, have the ability to transport them to work, and not break the bank on the initial purchase, what would you recommend? Ideas, suggestions, pros, cons, any input welcome.

A food saver system!

ilive2craft2
June 30th, 2014, 07:31 PM
We started doing the month of freezer meals in a day from Shabby Creek Cottage (http://www.theshabbycreekcottage.com/2013/10/freezer-meals.html) earlier this year - basically cook lots and freeze. We did the hamburger meals one afternoon and the chicken ones a different afternoon. We liked all of the meals. For these, she suggests the foil containers that have the paper lid - they have worked well for us. Since there are just the 2 of us, I got the smaller containers - they stack pretty well in the freezer. If we forget to take one out, you can usually pop one out of the foil container, put it in a glass dish and thaw it in the microwave.

Then leftovers go to lunch in whichever Glad/Ziploc/Rubbermaid thingy we have on hand. I almost want to pitch them and start over, since the lids don't match each other, but I pitch as they get stained/over used.

Mpyles
June 30th, 2014, 07:31 PM
My wife and I are trying to make some changes [read: going out to eat less] for nutritional and economic reasons. One of the ideas we're looking at is to cook larger batches of some of the foods we enjoy and then portion them out into smaller individual servings which can be frozen in our chest freezer then reheated when taken to work for lunches or used as a quick "We're both tired and don't feel like cooking" meal at the end of the day. eg. baked spaghetti, rice and beans, meatloaf and mashed potatoes. I'm looking for opinions on the various food storage containers out there.

Ziploc, GladWare, IKEA... It seems like there are a multitude of choices at different price points. We've used some of the ziploc containers and been pretty happy with them. We have some of the IKEA (the opaque white with red/translucent lids) stuff which we like but it is expensive and stains pretty easily with tomato based stuff. I've not used gladware before but it looks to be comparable to the ziploc stuff.

So- If you wanted to make some meals ahead, have the ability to transport them to work, and not break the bank on the initial purchase, what would you recommend? Ideas, suggestions, pros, cons, any input welcome.

A food saver system! FoodSaverŽ The #1 Vacuum Sealing System (http://www.foodsaver.com)

Doloris
June 30th, 2014, 07:41 PM
I think I would invest in a few of the Rubbermaid containers Bubby mentioned. They will be food safe and last longer than the ziplock or gladware. You could use ziplock or GW for things that don't need reheating. ie fruit, salad,-----that way you could keep your initial investment low by only buying a couple of the Rubbermaid ones.

asta
June 30th, 2014, 08:45 PM
I have a vacuum sealer thing and use it a lot for freezing many things. You don't get the freezer burn and the bags are very sturdy. You can vacuum seal things in the jars, although I haven't tried that yet. I freeze some items first on a tray (some fruits and veggies) and then vacuum seal so they won't get smashed. I did whole peaches though without a problem. I buy some meats in larger amts at Sam's Club and then individually seal steaks, chicken etc. and divide grd. round in 1# amts. I have more than gotten my money's worth out of mine.

I use the vac sealer also and love it, I can make a big pot of soup or chili then seal left overs, lay flat in freezer and the take up almost no room and dip in hot water to thaw. Very handy.

Vonnie
June 30th, 2014, 08:52 PM
I have the glass kind, they have rubber lids. Don't leave rubber lids on in the microwave - they warp - I found out the hard way. You can pack a small piece of press n seal or just use a napkin over the container to keep it from splattering in the microwave.

Also, as long as it's not raw meat, you can place a straw in a zip loc bag and suck the extra air out. I have done this a lot.

Hulamoon
June 30th, 2014, 08:56 PM
I have the glass kind, they have rubber lids. Don't leave rubber lids on in the microwave - they warp - I found out the hard way. You can pack a small piece of press n seal or just use a napkin over the container to keep it from splattering in the microwave.

Also, as long as it's not raw meat, you can place a straw in a zip loc bag and suck the extra air out. I have done this a lot.

I do the straw thing too! How funny.

Midge
June 30th, 2014, 09:04 PM
Agree Ryan, that cooking extra and freezing a second dinner's worth is the way to go when you have young kids at home. I also do that with stock I prepare at home. Cook up a huge stockpot full and I use the tall one quart plastic containers to strain the stock into for later use. When winter comes, putting a frozen container of stock in the fridge to defrost over night and then turning it into a really good soup quickly is the way to go.

That said, ladies and gents, I strongly caution you against using any plastic container to microwave your food. You are consuming BPAs which have horrible effects - especially on young children. They are endocrine disruptors. This is serious. Any cloudy plastic should not be in your kitchen at all if you care about health.

Angelia
June 30th, 2014, 09:20 PM
I use Mason jars for freezing stock. They fit into the shelf inside the door of my freezer.

I make lots of food to freeze--lasagna, enchilada casserole, chicken dishes,...you name it! I buy the ten pound bags of leg quarters (around 60˘ per pound), cut them apart, boil the back pieces for stock, cook the legs one way and the thighs another, and voila, many meals for not much money. We also cook a lot of turkey; it's very versatile.

I package up my husband's lunches (don't forget to label them--unless you want mystery meals), freeze them, and he chooses from among the variety available. He always comments that his co-workers with their bologna sandwiches appreciate the aroma of his food!

bubba
July 1st, 2014, 01:38 AM
I make huge batches of spaghetti then we freeze it in ziploc bags flat in the freezer and one frozen stack them. I don't freeze lunches as we just make them up from dinner leftovers. If we have pizza, I put two slices in a bag and throw those in the freezer for lunch.

I also like those clear Rubbermaid containers. You can get them at Walmart or Target, but the best deal is at Costco.

sewlucky
July 1st, 2014, 01:59 AM
I googled both Ziploc and Rubbermaid sites and both are BPA free and microwave reheat able.

TakeAlongs Square | Food Storage Containers | Rubbermaid (http://www.rubbermaid.com/Category/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?Prod_ID=RP091256)

Safety (http://www.ziploc.com/Pages/Safety.aspx)

We use both, and especially like that the investment is not huge in case one of us forgets a container in a bag for a day or five (usually the 17 yr old, lol) and we don't feel obligated to try to try to save it, lol.

For packing lunches for the next day we recently got these http://www.rubbermaid.com/Category/Pages/SubCategoryLanding.aspx?SubcatId=LunchBlox&CatName=FoodStorage. They're cool because you can portion out food easily and they stack and snap into ice blocks to stay cold.

Terri

Leah53
July 1st, 2014, 02:48 AM
I'm not much help, I store my food in 5 gal food grade buckets, yup, I'm one of those survivalist types. I buy #10 cans of dehydrated food and make meals in a jar, just add water and vacuum seal them in canning jars. They also make lunch size mylar bags, rather pricey but work well for freezing or dehydrating, you can also buy vacuum sealed dehydrated meals, just add water, again a bit pricey but taste pretty good. And there's always the old standby MRE's. I use Honeyville | The Leader in Food Storage & Baking Ingredients (http://honeyville.com/) , they have a discount coupon every couple of months or so. The food taste good, the dehydrated tomato taste like fresh with a rich flavor, the grandkids love the dehydrated fruits, banana's and strawberries, you can eat straight from the can or hydrate.

Any meats I freeze I buy in large quantities, like hamburg, I always wrap in saran wrap first then put inside a ziplock baggie, flatten them, they keep longer and thaw faster.

Mashed potatoes freeze well and don't get mushy, Bob Evans has mashed potatoes that freeze well also. Why not freeze your food in whatever you want and just carry paper plates with you to work, put the food on the paper plate and microwave.

We only use Rye bread, last forever, frozen or shelf.

I'm sure I haven't been helpful but I never miss out on an opportunity to get people to prep for emergencies.

Andrea F
July 1st, 2014, 03:26 AM
I have been using my good old tupperware for almost 20 years but didn't completely trust them with liquids. Now I use mostly these Allzweckdosen von Lock & Lock - Hochwertige Multifunktionsboxen von iSi Deutschland GmbH (http://www.lockandlock.info/) because they have silicon around the lid which seals everything completely. You can put them in the freezer and in the microwave, which I don't do very often because it is plastic. We really use them all the time, even to take our sandwiches or fruit with us to work.

Hulamoon
July 1st, 2014, 03:35 AM
I have been using my good old tupperware for almost 20 years but didn't completely trust them with liquids. Now I use mostly these Allzweckdosen von Lock & Lock - Hochwertige Multifunktionsboxen von iSi Deutschland GmbH (http://www.lockandlock.info/) because they have silicon around the lid which seals everything completely. You can put them in the freezer and in the microwave, which I don't do very often because it is plastic. We really use them all the time, even to take our sandwiches or fruit with us to work.

I had a lot of these but after awhile my flaps where breaking off. My bigger one's are okay, I store rice, sugar etc. The little ones didn't last too long.

toggpine
July 1st, 2014, 04:39 AM
We have a FoodSaver vacuum dealie. I really like those for freezing things. We buy in bulk and break it down to usable sizes here too. I flatten out my ground meats and freeze them in thin slabs. They stand up in my freezer drawer like file cards. I use a different color sharpie for each type of meat. Pork, chicken, turkey, beef. I just stack the freshest packages in the back and pull from the front.
You can freeze liquids in the bags. You just don't pull a vacuum, but gently and slowly squeeze the air out up to the sealing bar and seal. I freeze them flat and store like the meats.
I will often season or marinate the bigger cuts of meat before sealing & freezing. They are all ready to go by the time they are thawed.

I freeze our garden produce on a cookie sheet and then seal. It keeps the items from clumping and turning into a brick. I can pull out a packet of strawberries, cut the seal, dig out a handful of berries, and reseal without having to figure out what to do with the rest of the thawed berries when we only wanted a handful for a smoothie.

I have the jar sealer and I like to store our dried items with it. I use it on our rice, beans, herbs, and oatmeal. I go through the flour and sugar fast enough I haven't had to store it that way. I tried dried mushrooms this last fall and it has worked out really well.

Not much help for the lunch bit, but I have used the smaller glass containers or my Tupperware ones. I just put the leftovers in there and go. I haven't intentionally made up lunch portions. Hubby refuses to use the microwave at work. He tells me about all of the paints/chemicals the other guys heat up in there during the day. I can't say I blame him. So sammies are his go-to for lunches.

Good luck!

Mpyles
July 1st, 2014, 06:43 AM
Popular topic!

We have a vacuum sealer which we use sometimes but it won't help with lunches since we can't heat-n-eat out of them.

The ziploc containers are microwavable. I understand some people are not comfortable heating things in plastic containers which is fine but until I see an independent peer-reviewed scientific journal article stating otherwise I'll take my chances that it is reasonably safe.

Yes you can...put the meal on a paper plate and slide it in the saver bag and seal her up!

knitminnie
July 1st, 2014, 09:44 AM
My husband and I invested in a Foodsaver vacum sealer. It has been worth every penny. We seal leftovers and also use it to seal the specials that we find sometimes at the store. With a Foodsaver bag you just pull your leftovers out of the freezer and put it in a pot of water and bring it to a boil for a short while. You cut the top off and pour out your warm or hot food. It has not been watered down with the process nor does it have the burnt spots you get from the microwave. the bags are made for food and don't have the bph in them. the meats and other raw foods can just be thawed in the fridge or countertop as you choose. We loved ours so much we have two and share using them with our children. the meats and other items do not get freezer burn and keep very fresh. I say the investment in a Foodsaver is wise. Also the company has other containers if you choose to use them. Look into it. I think you will be surprised.

ravelim
July 1st, 2014, 10:53 AM
We have a vacuum locked sealer. When I had surgery last year we used it and froze stuff that would be easy for DH to reheat so I didn't have to eat cheese sandwiches for very meal. It tasted as good as when we put it in. We did things like meatloaf,lasagna, pork chops, chicken. I would think you could put them in a insulated lunch bag with a ice bag.
We have the floodwater but don't seem to be as smart as knitminnie.

SallyO'Sews
July 1st, 2014, 11:09 AM
So glad to have read this! With DS#8 getting married :icon_woohoo: and DD#10 leaving for college :icon_wave::icon_bump::icon_wave: this summer, and DS#9 going to college locally and eating many meals on campus, I'm going to have to learn to both shop and cook all over again!

ravelim
July 1st, 2014, 12:17 PM
Floodwater was to be foodsaver.

Leah53
July 1st, 2014, 01:23 PM
At least with dehydrated food, if you have flood water your food will be ready in 5 min.

Madeforyouinma11
July 1st, 2014, 01:59 PM
We also have a food saver system... I love it! It has two different settings, one for dry foods and one for wet foods. If I'm freezing soups I use the wet so it doesn't suck out all the juices. Also, for meats, I do a partial freeze and then put it in the food saver bags and vacuum seal them, using the dry food setting. Doing it this way doesn't take all the juices out of your meats. I also do lunch portions and then when packing lunches, cut it out of the bag and put in a microwavable container so it can be heated and eaten at work. I love this system because it doesn't get freezer burn...hate when that happens. They stack really well if you lay them flat and don't take up much room. I freeze fruits, veggies, meats, sauces and soups. I don't freeze pasta or potatoes. I feel they break down and don't taste very good when thawed. The only pasta I freeze is when I make lasagna, but I don't cook it all the way so the noodles don't break down. When thawed, I put it in the oven and it finishes cooking just like it would if I just made it.
Freezing foods and not eating out as often has become a habit in our house that I have come to love. The food is fresh and I buy it when it's on sale, so it definitely helps the budget.

Lilly
July 1st, 2014, 05:21 PM
We don't like using the Microwave and even tho the studies don't back me up (yet), I don't like storing in plastic containers. I researched the pyrex and anchor hocking glass containers and waited for great sales (Kohls etc) and bought a nice supply - a multi-pack and then individuals of the sizes I use most. They don't go to work easily, true, but they freeze and fridge easily.

oldsewer
July 1st, 2014, 10:45 PM
Just a note to remind you to get some stick on labels and a marker and keep them handy. I put the name and date on every package. I've been doing make ahead freezer meals for years, and this helps me keep things rotated.