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asta
June 10th, 2014, 09:31 AM
I have had type 1 diabetes for most of my life (about 40 years) recently I have been having trouble controlling my blood sugars and my Dr. has suggested I get an insulin pump. I know nothing about them and when talking to the pump expert at the hospital yesterday I am confused(?) wondering if anyone here has any experience with a pump and if they can give me their opinions as to the benefits or troubles they have run into.
Thanks for any input you can give me.

Doloris
June 10th, 2014, 09:37 AM
I am not diabetic, but have a niece that has been for years. She has had several pumps and she loves them. Her newest one is a small white box looking thing that she can attach in several different places. Looks to be a little bigger than those little white tubs you get a pat of butter in at a restaurant. She is very happy with hers. It is also waterproof.

JCY
June 10th, 2014, 11:17 AM
I am a retired nurse. I'm borderline Type 2 Diabetes. I would suggest you go on line & do the research of the products available. I know several people, & have had patients, who have insulin pumps. Everyone has been very pleased with the pump & feel like it makes their lives easier. There also are continuous glucose monitoring devices one can wear. You probably would have better luck getting helpful info. from a qualified diabetes educator who can explain how the pumps work. I wish you well. JCY

New York Sue
June 10th, 2014, 11:57 AM
I have a friend who manages his glucose very well, with a pump. Prior to the pump, he was poorly controlled. When I asked him about it, he said 'instead of the diabetes controlling me, I'm controlling the diabetes'. That is a GOOD thing!
Go for it, chica!

bubba
June 10th, 2014, 12:30 PM
I am not diabetic either, but I know of two people at work who use the pumps. One has been on it for at least ten years. Prior to that she used to have problems all the time controlling her levels, but once she started using the pump, that all went away. I know if you were asking her, she would urge you to go for it!

asta
June 10th, 2014, 12:55 PM
I am a retired nurse. I'm borderline Type 2 Diabetes. I would suggest you go on line & do the research of the products available. I know several people, & have had patients, who have insulin pumps. Everyone has been very pleased with the pump & feel like it makes their lives easier. There also are continuous glucose monitoring devices one can wear. You probably would have better luck getting helpful info. from a qualified diabetes educator who can explain how the pumps work. I wish you well. JCY

JCY, the problem is I have done the research and spoken to the diabetes educator and everything they say is positive. I am not naive enough to believe there are no drawbacks to a pump, was just hoping to hear from someone who actually has one who can tell me about the possible problems or the troubles involved.

Divine Daisy
June 10th, 2014, 05:29 PM
I use a pump lovie and it has liberated me entirely. There are some drawbacks, you can get scaring at your pump site for example but on the whole it has made my life much easier. Be careful you don't fall into bad habits with food, it can be very tempting to do so after watching every **** morsel for so long but the freedom to enjoy the occasional treat is utterly fab so long as you remain aware. The insulin is short acting so you don't have any long acting in your system......when its gone its gone so carry supplies with you.

You can take pump breaks if you need or want to and then go back to it. Some people feel nervous about the pump being in control and it can be hard to get used to trusting it. It can get expensive but all in all I would say...

I love it, take advice from your consultant and give it a try. If it doesn't suit you, you can go back but nothing ventured, nothing gained eh?

ilive2craft2
June 10th, 2014, 05:37 PM
I am a type 2 diabetic, so far controlled with a low dose of metformin. However, a friend of mine was a type 1 diabetic and had a pump for many years and said that it changed her life. I am sure that there are possible complications, just like with any medicine or device, but I think you are doing extra due diligence asking your friends here who might have one what their experiences have been. Nothing better than first hand knowledge of someone who has used one. It may give you more questions to ask so that you can determine if this is really right for you and make a truly informed decision. Good luck to you, whatever you decide to do. Lisa

Midge
June 10th, 2014, 05:43 PM
Beth, I have been a nurse practitioner for 35 years. While diabetes is not my specialization, I have treated many, many people with diabetes. The pumps are beyond wonderful. As Daisy pointed out, a downside is that scarring can develop at the insertion site. But I'm sure you know that you can develop skin problems at injection sites if you don't rotate sites. The pump can literally save your vision and kidneys. A huge body of research demonstrates the benefits of the very short acting insulin the pump delivers. But in Type I diabetes there is no panacea. You must be prepared, as Daisy points out. And you cannot become cavalier about your diet. It's not a license to cheat. But it can be a life saver and a tremendous boost to how you feel day to day. If your HbA1C is trending up and you can't manage it, what do you have to lose?

asta
June 10th, 2014, 06:37 PM
Thanks for all the input, it is comforting knowing there have been no bad stories. I meet with my educator again on Friday have lots of questions but we also start the process of getting one.

asta
June 10th, 2014, 06:40 PM
I use a pump lovie and it has liberated me entirely. There are some drawbacks, you can get scaring at your pump site for example but on the whole it has made my life much easier. Be careful you don't fall into bad habits with food, it can be very tempting to do so after watching every **** morsel for so long but the freedom to enjoy the occasional treat is utterly fab so long as you remain aware. The insulin is short acting so you don't have any long acting in your system......when its gone its gone so carry supplies with you.

You can take pump breaks if you need or want to and then go back to it. Some people feel nervous about the pump being in control and it can be hard to get used to trusting it. It can get expensive but all in all I would say...

I love it, take advice from your consultant and give it a try. If it doesn't suit you, you can go back but nothing ventured, nothing gained eh?

Daisy my biggest concern right now is sleeping with it, just afraid I will pull in out while tossing and turning, have you had this problem?

Divine Daisy
June 10th, 2014, 09:57 PM
no, never had a problem, actually never thought about it lol.................... wanders off wondering if I should worry...............naaa.