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RiverMomm
February 25th, 2014, 11:04 AM
Last night, I was sitting and hand basting the binding on my quilt. I have been sewing the binding for a day or so-on and off. Thinking to myself that it is so much easier to do binding 100% on the machine but just never got it right enough. This last step always makes me antsy to be finished. Yep, I tend to be impatient at times.

I sighed and said to DH, "You know, I could do a quilt in a day if I didn't hand sew the binding. Well, I could do it in a day if the fabric was precut-yeah, then I could do it in a day. I could do it in a day if sandwiching wasn't such a pain, so it would need to layered by itself by some sort of miracle. And really, if it would quilt itself, I could do it in a day."

He just smiled at me. But, gosh darn it, I could do a quilt in a day if . . . .

MomGram
February 25th, 2014, 11:35 AM
Vicky, you are too funny. If you come up with a way to do a whole quilt in a day please let us know. I can do a top in a day, without boarders but I think that's my best.

MayinJerset
February 25th, 2014, 11:52 AM
If we could get someone to do the actual cutting and sewing we all could make a quilt in a day.

Hulamoon
February 25th, 2014, 11:55 AM
I can't even do the simplest d9p in a day. I get all ocd about arranging it. lol I know some purists will frown at this, but if you want to machine quilt the binding you could try this. It's so awesome! I use regular snap hair clips from Walmart to hold it while it dries, and it washes out. The tip is so tiny and you hardly have to use that much. I found it locally.

Amazon.com: Colonial Needle Glue-Baste-It-2 Oz.: Arts, Crafts & Sewing (http://www.amazon.com/Colonial-Needle-BG82-Glue-Baste-It-2-Oz/dp/B002FHXUAI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1393339753&sr=8-2&keywords=roxanne+glue+baste+it)

LynneLeavell
February 25th, 2014, 11:56 AM
I could do a quilt in a day if someone else did all the prep work. I hate doing that part. I had rather just sit down and start sewing.

buckeyequilter
February 25th, 2014, 11:59 AM
I could do a quilt in a day.....if....I had nothing else to do, I used a panel, put the binding on by machine....heck fire shoot I could probably do 2.

HandsomeRyan
February 25th, 2014, 12:41 PM
I make my wife do half the work, spray baste, and machine sew bindings and we can crank out a simple baby quilt in a day if we really apply ourselves. Those E.B. "Quilt in a Day" books are a lie though. They are great books but very few of those quilts can be made in a reasonable day of working on it. Maybe if you include all 24 hours without sleep, food, or bathroom breaks?

Quiltfreestyle
February 25th, 2014, 01:05 PM
I could probably make a small quilt in a long day, as Ryan says, no meals no bathroom breaks. BUT who really wants to do a quilt in a day??? That's too much like a sweatshop for me, I would rather take my time & enjoy the process.

Jean Sewing Machine
February 25th, 2014, 01:22 PM
There was a video online where a guy was making a serger quilt in a day. He did it, but it was a 23 hour day from start to finish! I guess if you have to get it done that fast, then sleep can go by the wayside, but I would like to have the option to get in some ZZZs on the quilt making day!

Remember our Sasha, who made a quilt in 2 hours before she went to a baby shower, and then had all the people there want her to make one for them? She is amazing! I can do them pretty quickly, but not in 2 hours!

Vonnie
February 25th, 2014, 02:00 PM
Buy prequilted material and put a binding on it and call it done! LOL - do that for people you know will not take care of it.

But, I want to enjoy the process - not endure it!

Preeti
February 25th, 2014, 02:11 PM
I could complete a simple rail fence baby quilt in a day. I would use jelly roll strips for the rail fence, borders and binding.

RiverMomm
February 25th, 2014, 03:36 PM
I can't even do the simplest d9p in a day. I get all ocd about arranging it. lol I know some purists will frown at this, but if you want to machine quilt the binding you could try this. It's so awesome! I use regular snap hair clips from Walmart to hold it while it dries, and it washes out. The tip is so tiny and you hardly have to use that much. I found it locally.

Amazon.com: Colonial Needle Glue-Baste-It-2 Oz.: Arts, Crafts & Sewing (http://www.amazon.com/Colonial-Needle-BG82-Glue-Baste-It-2-Oz/dp/B002FHXUAI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1393339753&sr=8-2&keywords=roxanne+glue+baste+it)

I am so going to try this!!! I put it on my wish list on Amazon. Next shopping trip to the States and I will buy it.

The quilt I am finishing is a d9p that I pieced last spring before we moved. Lorie, I know what you mean because I have to laugh as I remember it took me forever to place the blocks (and yes, as I quilted it, I noticed a mistake but at this point, no one will notice except me . . .umm hopefully) I have had to jump right in and sandwich, quilt and bind (my three least favorite things of my favorite hobby). Because it has been almost a year, I don't have that happy feeling of piecing the top.

I like most of the process of making a quilt . . . touching and finding the perfect fabrics, piecing the top are my favs. But I find the are levels of nerves with other areas. Cutting (mild nerves)-WHAT if I cut wrong?!? sandwiching the layers-still haven't found a way to do it well and be comfortable at the same time. As it is now, I do it on the floor, which means I am on the floor. Maybe I am not a floor person. :) Quilting is ok but then halfway through I start getting the feeling of wanting-no NEEDING to see the finished quilt. It's just a little nagging feeling at first. THEN I do the binding by hand and I get such a restless feeling that I just can't wait to have the finished quilt.

JCY
February 25th, 2014, 04:58 PM
I don't understand why hand basting the binding on a quilt is a necessary step. Just sew it on the machine to begin with. I start in the middle of the right side, leave a good 12" pinned but unsewn, then just stitch 1/4" around the quilt. I remove it from the machine to fold & pin the corners, then sew the next side, etc. till I come back to the original side. I leave another 12" or so unsewn, to leave room for stitching the binding where it meets. After you sew the binding ends together & finish stitching, you're done with side one. Turn the binding over to the back, pin, press then do SITD, sewing on the front, & you're done. If you've carefully & evenly turned over the edges, you should be able to catch the back with your stitching. I use a gauge to get the hem exact. If it's a special quilt, you may want to hand hem the back of the binding. But on my baby quilts, I use SITD all the time. JCY

Sheena
February 25th, 2014, 08:00 PM
I'ved made a quilt in a day but it was only a small one.:D

RiverMomm
February 25th, 2014, 09:58 PM
I don't understand why hand basting the binding on a quilt is a necessary step. Just sew it on the machine to begin with. I start in the middle of the right side, leave a good 12" pinned but unsewn, then just stitch 1/4" around the quilt. I remove it from the machine to fold & pin the corners, then sew the next side, etc. till I come back to the original side. I leave another 12" or so unsewn, to leave room for stitching the binding where it meets. After you sew the binding ends together & finish stitching, you're done with side one. Turn the binding over to the back, pin, press then do SITD, sewing on the front, & you're done. If you've carefully & evenly turned over the edges, you should be able to catch the back with your stitching. I use a gauge to get the hem exact. If it's a special quilt, you may want to hand hem the back of the binding. But on my baby quilts, I use SITD all the time. JCY

I have only been quilting for about two years (actually a year and a half because I took 9 months off). I am 100% self taught from the internet. I have never been able to take a class in person which is a problem for me. I am a visual learner and would do so much better if I could have someone show me. I did machine binding for my first 5 quilts. Maybe ONE looked sort of ok. I tried and researched and tried again. I am doing something wrong. At this point I would venture to guess its operator error. I was ripping out so much that it ended up a toss on which was faster/better-machine or hand sewing. I finally gave up machine binding and started hand binding. But I am always open to any hints, tricks, notions, you tube lessons out there that will help me machine bind.

In other words, if I can do it on the machine, I do it on the machine. I only hand sew when I accept defeat. Guess I am the opposite of a quilting purist. ;)

Vonnie
February 25th, 2014, 11:34 PM
I don't understand why hand basting the binding on a quilt is a necessary step. Just sew it on the machine to begin with. I start in the middle of the right side, leave a good 12" pinned but unsewn, then just stitch 1/4" around the quilt. I remove it from the machine to fold & pin the corners, then sew the next side, etc. till I come back to the original side. I leave another 12" or so unsewn, to leave room for stitching the binding where it meets. After you sew the binding ends together & finish stitching, you're done with side one. Turn the binding over to the back, pin, press then do SITD, sewing on the front, & you're done. If you've carefully & evenly turned over the edges, you should be able to catch the back with your stitching. I use a gauge to get the hem exact. If it's a special quilt, you may want to hand hem the back of the binding. But on my baby quilts, I use SITD all the time. JCY

I can't get the hang of this method. I watched an episode of Love of Quilting where Liz Porter showed how to do it. No matter how careful I was, there were several places I did not catch the binding on the back. I had to hand stitch those areas. Looked awful.

Now my favorite method is to make my binding 3", fold in half and sew to the back, then flip to the front and use my stitch in the ditch foot with the needle a little to the right of the edge of the binding. Makes like a 1/16" seam allowance. The back just looks like another row of quilting and by using 3" instead of 2 1/4 or 2 1/2" binding it's wide enough that the pressor foot is past the major bulk of the binding. The stitch in the ditch foot helps greatly with keeping an even stitch. Sometimes I use a decorative stitch.

Vonnie
February 25th, 2014, 11:37 PM
I have only been quilting for about two years (actually a year and a half because I took 9 months off). I am 100% self taught from the internet. I have never been able to take a class in person which is a problem for me. I am a visual learner and would do so much better if I could have someone show me. I did machine binding for my first 5 quilts. Maybe ONE looked sort of ok. I tried and researched and tried again. I am doing something wrong. At this point I would venture to guess its operator error. I was ripping out so much that it ended up a toss on which was faster/better-machine or hand sewing. I finally gave up machine binding and started hand binding. But I am always open to any hints, tricks, notions, you tube lessons out there that will help me machine bind.

In other words, if I can do it on the machine, I do it on the machine. I only hand sew when I accept defeat. Guess I am the opposite of a quilting purist. ;)

I think whatever methods works best for you is the right one to use. Besides, I love how many different ways there are to make binding.

Simply Quilting
February 25th, 2014, 11:45 PM
I am left alone and have some idea of what I want the layout to be. The layout is what can hang me up for hours. I have done several twin size tops in one day but the quilting is another thing. I either have to send them out to be quilted or put them on the quilt frame and tack them. I have not gotten brave enough to try machine quilting yet with a large quilt. I did it with a doll quilt and did fine. It is one my to do list.

mdenzine
February 26th, 2014, 12:37 AM
In did a Trip Around the World quilt top in a day. I enjoy the process. Much more when I can take my time

Mchelem
February 26th, 2014, 01:14 AM
I'ved made a quilt in a day but it was only a small one.:D

Me too. Only baby quilts with a large pattern, or something simple.

Monique
February 26th, 2014, 08:19 AM
Vicky I too could quilt it all in a day IF................................................ ..that's never going to happen.

Quiltfreestyle
February 26th, 2014, 01:38 PM
Just as an option....
When I machine bind my quilts (which I do most of the time) I sew the binding on the BACK side first. That way I can fold it over to the front evenly & stitch it down on the front side too. I find it looks neater this way, I can control where the stitching line is better. The stitching on the back ends up running right next to the binding, so it's not really noticeable.

lilmouse
February 27th, 2014, 02:48 AM
You all are going to shoot me but I have done it several times.......usually JRR quilts or something very easy....and I always make the binding when I first start the quilt so it is ready to go and that is machine binding only...no hand sewing whatsoever!