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soul60s
February 12th, 2014, 03:07 PM
Since the ta-ta's has been a subject on here, I have a question for you ladies. Those of you who have had to deal with the big "C", did it run in your family or were you the first? I am turning the big 5-0 next month and the doc wants me to get a mam. I have had one in the past and have no problem getting it but just wondering what the stats are from real people on here.

Jackiejs
February 12th, 2014, 03:38 PM
I am a Ten Year survior... yah ! I was 45 when I had the big "C" No one in my family ever had it. I was the first.! My doctor says now it runs in your family.. I have 3 Daughters.. scares me to death.

Apache Lady
February 12th, 2014, 03:42 PM
Hi Joanne, I had my first mam at 40 and a calcification was found. I was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ, DCIS for short. Lucky it was found early and was removed with a lumpectomy. I was encouraged to have radiation treatment which I did and taking Tamoxafin for 5 years, one more to go! Fortunately for me it was found early and so far so good, no more questionable mams. I blame birth control, I had been taking the pill for about 12 years prior to this. I am the first in my family to get breast cancer. My mom has had two lumpectomies for suspicious lumps, but none have been cancerous. I was extremely lucky, I can't help but think what my prognosis would have been if I waited until 50 for my first mam. I know this is all personal preference, no one can pinpoint when to get their first mam and doctors argue about this. But I did encourage all my co-workers to start having their mams ASAP. Hope it all goes well for you, it's a "smashing" experience :lol:

Madeforyouinma11
February 12th, 2014, 03:49 PM
All my mammograms have come back good. I have three sisters and the oldest had BC and beat it. So far, the rest of us have been fine, but our doctors are aware that my older sister had it and they make sure to pay close attention.

CountryHut
February 12th, 2014, 03:52 PM
my #2 sister was the 1st with BC in my family - she was 53 when she lost her battle --
now her eldest son has BC - he will be 43 tomorrow

bubba
February 12th, 2014, 04:03 PM
My mom had it, and she is the only one who has. It was nearly 30 years ago and it never recurred. There are five girls in the family and none have gotten it :knocking on wood: I remember taking her to the doctor for the followup after her surgery and we could hear a man in one of the examining rooms....he had just been diagnosed with breast cancer. That was the first I had heard of a man getting it.

In my husbands family, things have not gone so good. His mother came from a family with eleven kids, nine girls and two boys. All of the women who have died, to included his mother and grandma, have died of ovarian cancer, a couple of breast cancer. Clearly it runs in the family. We have two daughters and it terrifies me that they will get it too. They are both done having children and have asked to have hysterectomies and their doctors refuse, saying they are too young. At least they are both well aware and keep on top of things.

Wwena
February 12th, 2014, 06:50 PM
I'm not sure you will get valid statistics from a forum. Ask your doctor! :)

I forgot my mammogram the other week, calling tomorrow to re-schedule (and apologise). I will ask then too!

You can find out if you're likely to get it, right? I read that's why Angelina Jolie took pre-emptive action.

soul60s
February 12th, 2014, 07:40 PM
I am a Ten Year survior... yah ! I was 45 when I had the big "C" No one in my family ever had it. I was the first.! My doctor says now it runs in your family.. I have 3 Daughters.. scares me to death.

Thank you so much for the info. I am very happy that you are a 10 year survivor! This helps a lot.

soul60s
February 12th, 2014, 07:44 PM
Hi Joanne, I had my first mam at 40 and a calcification was found. I was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ, DCIS for short. Lucky it was found early and was removed with a lumpectomy. I was encouraged to have radiation treatment which I did and taking Tamoxafin for 5 years, one more to go! Fortunately for me it was found early and so far so good, no more questionable mams. I blame birth control, I had been taking the pill for about 12 years prior to this. I am the first in my family to get breast cancer. My mom has had two lumpectomies for suspicious lumps, but none have been cancerous. I was extremely lucky, I can't help but think what my prognosis would have been if I waited until 50 for my first mam. I know this is all personal preference, no one can pinpoint when to get their first mam and doctors argue about this. But I did encourage all my co-workers to start having their mams ASAP. Hope it all goes well for you, it's a "smashing" experience :lol:

Geez. I was on BC pills for 25 years. Sigh. This is very eye-opening. Praying for you that it stays away forever. :icon_hug:

soul60s
February 12th, 2014, 07:47 PM
my #2 sister was the 1st with BC in my family - she was 53 when she lost her battle --
now her eldest son has BC - he will be 43 tomorrow

I am so sorry. Breaks my heart. I get after my husband all the time to be tested with all cancers since his dad had 5 different ones. He survived them all. Breast was one of them. Think I will look for the paperwork that I had gotten from the doc and misplaced. Time to take this seriously.

soul60s
February 12th, 2014, 07:51 PM
My mom had it, and she is the only one who has. It was nearly 30 years ago and it never recurred. There are five girls in the family and none have gotten it :knocking on wood: I remember taking her to the doctor for the followup after her surgery and we could hear a man in one of the examining rooms....he had just been diagnosed with breast cancer. That was the first I had heard of a man getting it.

In my husbands family, things have not gone so good. His mother came from a family with eleven kids, nine girls and two boys. All of the women who have died, to included his mother and grandma, have died of ovarian cancer, a couple of breast cancer. Clearly it runs in the family. We have two daughters and it terrifies me that they will get it too. They are both done having children and have asked to have hysterectomies and their doctors refuse, saying they are too young. At least they are both well aware and keep on top of things.

I argue with the doc all the time about my husband being tested more frequently. His dad and brother had prostate cancer. Both had their prostates removed and so far his brother is okay (dad passed from a different reason). The doc wants to test hubby every 5 years since his last test was fine. I am not fine with that. Anything could happen during those 5 years. He is so high risk.

soul60s
February 12th, 2014, 07:57 PM
I'm not sure you will get valid statistics from a forum. Ask your doctor! :)

I forgot my mammogram the other week, calling tomorrow to re-schedule (and apologise). I will ask then too!

You can find out if you're likely to get it, right? I read that's why Angelina Jolie took pre-emptive action.

This is just very informal. I know it is a small amount of people compared to what doctors say but I want to hear from real people who have been there. I was told by my doc that where before, when you tested for BC, it was once every 5 years if everything was okay. Now they say that is too often. Medical science changes. Real people know. I WILL have my test done since reading all of this. Sometimes it takes more than a pamphlet and a doc to jolt you into reality. I am calling this week.

GuitarGramma
February 12th, 2014, 07:59 PM
My oldest daughter was diagnosed with breast cancer on her 27th birthday. While no one in our direct line has had BC, I have two first cousins on my dad's side who had and survived BC. Because we have four daughters, we had my oldest tested for the BRCA gene. The test was negative, so we did not have the other girls tested; it's a $3000 test.

Because of passport and visa requirements, my oldest had two chest X-rays before she was 18 years old; my other girls were too young to need X-rays according to the rules. I am convinced that one of the X-ray machines was putting out too much radiation. A whole group of us had to have chest X-rays to extend our visas on an overseas assignment. Of those 20 people, four came down with chest or breast cancer within a few years. I know there were two X-ray rooms because they called my daughter and me in at the same time and we went into separate rooms. So that means that probably 10 people in our group were in the same X-ray room, and almost half of them got chest/breast cancer (and there may have been more, those are just the ones I heard of through the grapevine). I just find that too big of a coincidence to discount the possibility of a rogue machine.

I'm happy to say that all four of these people, including my daughter, beat the cancer. My doctors now watch me uber closely because "it runs in your family." I'm just happy that my beautiful daughter survived.

My personal story is that I've had a number of lumps and bumps biopsied, including breast lumps. I'm very thankful that all have turned out to be benign.

Regarding the Pill and breast cancer, a number of studies--though not all--have shown a link. It's scary to know that an entire generation has been used as guinea pigs.

HandsOffItsMine
February 12th, 2014, 08:04 PM
Over 40, get yourself a mammogram IMO. Early detection is key with any type of cancer.

My mother was 49 when she was diagnosed at stage 4 with a rare form of uterine cancer - she would have been in the 5% range based on risk factor. I was 29 with a 40% hereditary risk at that time, started with a pap test every 6 month, within 2 years the risk factor became known to rise to 70% - growing rapidly between 30 and 35. At age 36.5 my pap was negative, at 37 it was stage 2! I had a Radical Hysterectomy and all the required treatments involved. I've been a survivor for 17 years. :)

My mother's mother is one of nine girls, she died of a brain tumor, she had 3 mischarges and a hysterectomy, we're not sure if she had any signs of ovarian/cervical or uterine cancer. Six of her sisters died of breast cancer. Many breast cancer doctors feel that I wasn't at high risk because my mother didn't have breast cancer and my grandmother was once removed. However, I did have annual mammos since my 40th B-day and manual breast exams at my 6 months pap test by my gyno.

Last June I had my pap and mammo after missing 2 years due to lack of insurance, I found a County program for women over 50 which is for free by chance. I wasn't worried about my mammo at all, didn't feel anything. I was worried about my pap as I had been feeling crappy and not myself.

I got the call that my pap was negative. "Great" I said Then the pause on the other side. "But your mammogram shows some concern, the radiologist would like you to come back tomorrow morning." And so the TaTa story on The Forum began. It proved to have 3 nodes and malignancy. I had a stereoscopic biopsy done with radiation treatment and just last week had the follow-up mammo/ultrasound done. The mass was complete removed by the biopsy with clean tissue showing, the other two nodes have shrunk 70+% - I'm considered clean. I've beaten this second type of cancer! I feel blessed beyond words. Early detection is very important, especially in my case, all 3 nodes were deep against my chest wall. They CAN NOT be felt by a manual breast exam! Only can be detected by a mammogram and the two smaller ones were found during the ultrasound. Therefore, YOU need to make that call to your doctor and schedule a mammogram.

If you don't have insurance as many of us have lost our jobs or our spouses have lost their jobs and coverage. Call your county health agencies and tell them your age! Apparently there are various programs that are funded by state and federal programs for women both for breast and paps.

Also if you are a DES baby there are programs for health care for you as well. (Normally after a hysterectomy, you wouldn't get a pap but as a DES baby, I need to keep having paps for the rest of my life.)

"Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic form of the female hormone estrogen (http://www.cancer.gov/Common/PopUps/popDefinition.aspx?id=CDR0000046076&version=Patient&language=English). It was prescribed to pregnant women between 1940 and 1971 to prevent miscarriage, premature labor, and related complications of pregnancy (1 (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/DES#r1)). The use of DES declined after studies in the 1950s showed that it was not effective in preventing these problems."

Long story short...Get your Pap Yearly once you are sexually active, do your self breast exam monthly, have your doctor do a manual breast exam at your annual check up. After 40, schedule a Mammogram. When in doubt about something strange going on with your body, go to the doctor! Early detection can save your life!

Huggers, Ruby
2xC Survivor and feeling very, very blessed (watched over by my angel "Mams")

bubba
February 12th, 2014, 09:09 PM
Joanne,
My husband had a large (the largest the surgeons had ever seen) in his spinal column and behind his lung eight years ago. The only symptom he had was numbness starting in his feet and working it's way up his body, and falling because of those symptoms. It started one year in Hawaii, and he was afraid to tell me while we were there. Apparently he was also afraid to tell me for a week after we got home! Anyway, they type tumor he has is 98% of the time not cancerous, and we were lucky he was in that percentile. He has to go yearly for MRI's (this year is on Friday). After last years, they told us it was regrowing but they are not concerned as it is very very slow growing and he has no symptoms. They said he had the first one probably at least ten years! So even though I worry all the time about it, this time of the year is always worse waiting to see what they find.

easyquilts
February 12th, 2014, 09:55 PM
My two of my cousins...sibs....had cancer....only one survived.... I had DCIS in 2008. ... I am seriously late for my last diagnostic mammogram....

Sewbee
February 12th, 2014, 10:00 PM
Approximately 80% of women with breast cancer had no family history at the time of their diagnosis. While having a family history is significant and does increase one's risk, not having a family history is obviously not a "get out of jail free" card. There are many "myths" surrounding breast cancer risk and treatments.


16 common myths about breast cancer (http://www.cancer.med.umich.edu/news/brcancer_myths06.shtml)


The recent mammogram study results this week have reopened the controversy about the value and effectiveness of mammograms saving lives. Mammograms are not perfect, but there is no question they have detected many cancers. I had my first mammogram at 36 just because it was offered free by my employer. I decided to get a "baseline" film to have for future comparisons and in the process discovered I had very dense breasts. A repeat mammogram at age 39 showed microcalcifications which can be precursors to the development of a tumor. I had a biopsy to remove and inspect the microcalcs and results were benign.


I continued to get annual mammograms after age 40. At age 47 a mammogram detected a mass in that same biopsy location and I had my first breast cancer diagnosis...stage 2 IDC, 2 positive nodes, lumpectomy, chemo, radiation, tamoxifen...the standard treatment plan. Annual follow up mammograms never revealed any additional issues but 5 years later at age 52 a mass was felt on palpation in the other breast but could not be picked up by mammogram or ultrasound. A breast MRI finally was able to see through dense breasts and revealed a large mass.


This new primary breast cancer was unrelated to the first. It was a stage 3C ILC, 5.1cm tumor with 23 positive nodes. Bilateral mastectomy, chemo again...(yep lost my hair again)...full 3-field radiation, 5 years IV Zometa and now going on 8 years still taking daily Aromasin.


So the good news is I am a 13 year and 8 year survivor! Mammograms found my first cancer but totally missed the second. I still believe that until they have better screening technology, women 40 and over should get mammograms. If you have dense breasts, a personal history or family history, fight for a MRI which has better tumor detection.


Inform yourself about the true stats and risks of breast cancer.


Breast Cancer Risk in American Women - National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/detection/probability-breast-cancer)


Don't delay reporting to your doctor any unusual lumps or "thickened" areas you detect on your own. You know your body better than anyone else!


And if someday you hear those dreaded words...just know there are many, many survivors out here who prove treatment works and there is definitely LIFE after diagnosis!


We women are so good at taking care of others...let's take care of ourselves too! :)

New York Sue
February 12th, 2014, 10:18 PM
There is a genetic trait, no doubt.
I have a neighbor who has lost her mother to colon cancer, her sister from cervical cancer, and now she is fighting breast cancer...
JAYZEE! I have NEVER heard cancer come up ONCE in my family! (Am I really saying this out LOUD...)

We just seem to have heart attacks and strokes.
Is that a 'good thing'?

If you have a STRONG genetic trait, stay on TOP of it, chica!

New York Sue
February 12th, 2014, 10:21 PM
Approximately 80% of women with breast cancer had no family history at the time of their diagnosis. While having a family history is significant and does increase one's risk, not having a family history is obviously not a "get out of jail free" card. There are many "myths" surrounding breast cancer risk and treatments.


16 common myths about breast cancer (http://www.cancer.med.umich.edu/news/brcancer_myths06.shtml)


The recent mammogram study results this week have reopened the controversy about the value and effectiveness of mammograms saving lives. Mammograms are not perfect, but there is no question they have detected many cancers. I had my first mammogram at 36 just because it was offered free by my employer. I decided to get a "baseline" film to have for future comparisons and in the process discovered I had very dense breasts. A repeat mammogram at age 39 showed microcalcifications which can be precursors to the development of a tumor. I had a biopsy to remove and inspect the microcalcs and results were benign.


I continued to get annual mammograms after age 40. At age 47 a mammogram detected a mass in that same biopsy location and I had my first breast cancer diagnosis...stage 2 IDC, 2 positive nodes, lumpectomy, chemo, radiation, tamoxifen...the standard treatment plan. Annual follow up mammograms never revealed any additional issues but 5 years later at age 52 a mass was felt on palpation in the other breast but could not be picked up by mammogram or ultrasound. A breast MRI finally was able to see through dense breasts and revealed a large mass.


This new primary breast cancer was unrelated to the first. It was a stage 3C ILC, 5.1cm tumor with 23 positive nodes. Bilateral mastectomy, chemo again...(yep lost my hair again)...full 3-field radiation, 5 years IV Zometa and now going on 8 years still taking daily Aromasin.


So the good news is I am a 13 year and 8 year survivor! Mammograms found my first cancer but totally missed the second. I still believe that until they have better screening technology, women 40 and over should get mammograms. If you have dense breasts, a personal history or family history, fight for a MRI which has better tumor detection.


Inform yourself about the true stats and risks of breast cancer.


Breast Cancer Risk in American Women - National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/detection/probability-breast-cancer)


Don't delay reporting to your doctor any unusual lumps or "thickened" areas you detect on your own. You know your body better than anyone else!


And if someday you hear those dreaded words...just know there are many, many survivors out here who prove treatment works and there is definitely LIFE after diagnosis!


We women are so good at taking care of others...let's take care of ourselves too! :)

Very GOOD information shared, my friend! ;)

soul60s
February 12th, 2014, 10:25 PM
Over 40, get yourself a mammogram IMO. Early detection is key with any type of cancer.

My mother was 49 when she was diagnosed at stage 4 with a rare form of uterine cancer - she would have been in the 5% range based on risk factor. I was 29 with a 40% hereditary risk at that time, started with a pap test every 6 month, within 2 years the risk factor became known to rise to 70% - growing rapidly between 30 and 35. At age 36.5 my pap was negative, at 37 it was stage 2! I had a Radical Hysterectomy and all the required treatments involved. I've been a survivor for 17 years. :)

My mother's mother is one of nine girls, she died of a brain tumor, she had 3 mischarges and a hysterectomy, we're not sure if she had any signs of ovarian/cervical or uterine cancer. Six of her sisters died of breast cancer. Many breast cancer doctors feel that I wasn't at high risk because my mother didn't have breast cancer and my grandmother was once removed. However, I did have annual mammos since my 40th B-day and manual breast exams at my 6 months pap test by my gyno.

Last June I had my pap and mammo after missing 2 years due to lack of insurance, I found a County program for women over 50 which is for free by chance. I wasn't worried about my mammo at all, didn't feel anything. I was worried about my pap as I had been feeling crappy and not myself.

I got the call that my pap was negative. "Great" I said Then the pause on the other side. "But your mammogram shows some concern, the radiologist would like you to come back tomorrow morning." And so the TaTa story on The Forum began. It proved to have 3 nodes and malignancy. I had a stereoscopic biopsy done with radiation treatment and just last week had the follow-up mammo/ultrasound done. The mass was complete removed by the biopsy with clean tissue showing, the other two nodes have shrunk 70+% - I'm considered clean. I've beaten this second type of cancer! I feel blessed beyond words. Early detection is very important, especially in my case, all 3 nodes were deep against my chest wall. They CAN NOT be felt by a manual breast exam! Only can be detected by a mammogram and the two smaller ones were found during the ultrasound. Therefore, YOU need to make that call to your doctor and schedule a mammogram.

If you don't have insurance as many of us have lost our jobs or our spouses have lost their jobs and coverage. Call your county health agencies and tell them your age! Apparently there are various programs that are funded by state and federal programs for women both for breast and paps.

Also if you are a DES baby there are programs for health care for you as well. (Normally after a hysterectomy, you wouldn't get a pap but as a DES baby, I need to keep having paps for the rest of my life.)

"Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic form of the female hormone estrogen (http://www.cancer.gov/Common/PopUps/popDefinition.aspx?id=CDR0000046076&version=Patient&language=English). It was prescribed to pregnant women between 1940 and 1971 to prevent miscarriage, premature labor, and related complications of pregnancy (1 (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/DES#r1)). The use of DES declined after studies in the 1950s showed that it was not effective in preventing these problems."

Long story short...Get your Pap Yearly once you are sexually active, do your self breast exam monthly, have your doctor do a manual breast exam at your annual check up. After 40, schedule a Mammogram. When in doubt about something strange going on with your body, go to the doctor! Early detection can save your life!

Huggers, Ruby
2xC Survivor and feeling very, very blessed (watched over by my angel "Mams")

Wow! I am going to call. There is no history in my family (probably because most have died early due to heart disease) and I have no concerns so this is a perfect time to go. You all have been very honest and open and the best way to thank you is to get it done and be able to report back that everything is okay. Hugs to you and everyone else on here. :icon_hug: & :icon_kiss:

soul60s
February 12th, 2014, 10:28 PM
Joanne,
My husband had a large (the largest the surgeons had ever seen) in his spinal column and behind his lung eight years ago. The only symptom he had was numbness starting in his feet and working it's way up his body, and falling because of those symptoms. It started one year in Hawaii, and he was afraid to tell me while we were there. Apparently he was also afraid to tell me for a week after we got home! Anyway, they type tumor he has is 98% of the time not cancerous, and we were lucky he was in that percentile. He has to go yearly for MRI's (this year is on Friday). After last years, they told us it was regrowing but they are not concerned as it is very very slow growing and he has no symptoms. They said he had the first one probably at least ten years! So even though I worry all the time about it, this time of the year is always worse waiting to see what they find.

How can they say you have a tumor and don't worry??? I just couldn't "not worry". I am just not that brave. I am not a worrier normally but you don't mess with those things. Every day matters. Sigh.

soul60s
February 12th, 2014, 10:30 PM
My two of my cousins...sibs....had cancer....only one survived.... I had DCIS in 2008. ... I am seriously late for my last diagnostic mammogram....

What is DCIS?

soul60s
February 12th, 2014, 10:46 PM
Approximately 80% of women with breast cancer had no family history at the time of their diagnosis. While having a family history is significant and does increase one's risk, not having a family history is obviously not a "get out of jail free" card. There are many "myths" surrounding breast cancer risk and treatments.


16 common myths about breast cancer (http://www.cancer.med.umich.edu/news/brcancer_myths06.shtml)


The recent mammogram study results this week have reopened the controversy about the value and effectiveness of mammograms saving lives. Mammograms are not perfect, but there is no question they have detected many cancers. I had my first mammogram at 36 just because it was offered free by my employer. I decided to get a "baseline" film to have for future comparisons and in the process discovered I had very dense breasts. A repeat mammogram at age 39 showed microcalcifications which can be precursors to the development of a tumor. I had a biopsy to remove and inspect the microcalcs and results were benign.


I continued to get annual mammograms after age 40. At age 47 a mammogram detected a mass in that same biopsy location and I had my first breast cancer diagnosis...stage 2 IDC, 2 positive nodes, lumpectomy, chemo, radiation, tamoxifen...the standard treatment plan. Annual follow up mammograms never revealed any additional issues but 5 years later at age 52 a mass was felt on palpation in the other breast but could not be picked up by mammogram or ultrasound. A breast MRI finally was able to see through dense breasts and revealed a large mass.


This new primary breast cancer was unrelated to the first. It was a stage 3C ILC, 5.1cm tumor with 23 positive nodes. Bilateral mastectomy, chemo again...(yep lost my hair again)...full 3-field radiation, 5 years IV Zometa and now going on 8 years still taking daily Aromasin.


So the good news is I am a 13 year and 8 year survivor! Mammograms found my first cancer but totally missed the second. I still believe that until they have better screening technology, women 40 and over should get mammograms. If you have dense breasts, a personal history or family history, fight for a MRI which has better tumor detection.


Inform yourself about the true stats and risks of breast cancer.


Breast Cancer Risk in American Women - National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/detection/probability-breast-cancer)


Don't delay reporting to your doctor any unusual lumps or "thickened" areas you detect on your own. You know your body better than anyone else!


And if someday you hear those dreaded words...just know there are many, many survivors out here who prove treatment works and there is definitely LIFE after diagnosis!


We women are so good at taking care of others...let's take care of ourselves too! :)

You're right Linda. We are our own worst enemy. I know I am bad about going to the doctors. I just went for my annual pap and that is who is ordering the mam but I have no trust in my pcp so I haven't been to her in 7 years. I have to find another. If I get sick (which is rare) I just go to the walkin clinic that she works in and see someone else. Getting an appointment with her is 6 months of waiting. She is all about money and I think patients should be a first concern. I am so sick of the double or triple booking, waiting an hour to get in for a scheduled appointment only to be seen for 5 minutes tops. I get poison ivy every year. I went to her every year. In between my first initial breakout of poison ivy and the end of the summer, I would get it 1 or 2 more times. I had already seen her for it and have a huge history of getting it and going there but she would make me go every time. Really??? I am not a new patient, this is not a new thing. She could call in something for the 2nd or 3rd breakout but she doesn't. It's money. It is $185 a pop per visit (thank God for insurance) but that is for 5 minutes. Triple booking is $555 per 5 minutes x 60 minutes = about $1600+ per hour x 8 hours = $12,800 a day. Of course there are lots of exceptions but with all that, you would think there would be a little give and take on a long time patient that has been seen already that season for the same thing. Rant over. Just sick of it. Sore subject (the way people are treated like lab rats). I have no problem with specialists though. Sorry everyone.

snippet
February 12th, 2014, 11:54 PM
I haven't had cancer, but my mom died from BC. And all her sisters and brothers (12 kids in the family) have died from some sort of cancer, many of the girls had BC. So I've had mammograms every 5 years since I was 35. When I turned 50, it became once a year. I hate having it done, but I consider it a necessary evil. I've got a dense area on one side, so they always have to do retakes - which involves even tighter squeezing. I just hate that.

I swear if men had to get their 'ahem' members pressed flat like we do for our ta-ta's, they would invent a better screening method!

HandsOffItsMine
February 13th, 2014, 10:14 AM
Wow! I am going to call. There is no history in my family (probably because most have died early due to heart disease) and I have no concerns so this is a perfect time to go. You all have been very honest and open and the best way to thank you is to get it done and be able to report back that everything is okay. Hugs to you and everyone else on here. :icon_hug: & :icon_kiss:


(((Joanne))) That would make me very, very happy!

My dad's side has all the heart disease issues, I gave up smoking years ago TG and watch what I eat for the most part. lol I figure my odd are crappy enough! :P

Seriously though, I didn't live my life in constant worry, I got my scheduled checkups. I've always felt that as long as I was on the ball, we could catch things early enough, I would always have a good fighting chance. The cure might suck but I could fight it.

I think for your own peace of mind, it's a great thing to do for yourself!

Huggers, Ruby

Wwena
February 13th, 2014, 02:42 PM
Over here they have recently changed it so that the age when they stop doing the mammogram is raised. I think we do them at 4 yr intervals. I certainly don't think that's too often... The test Angelina Jolie had was a DNA test, to see if she was likely to get it. It's amazing what we can find out today! (Trying to stay positive here...)


This is just very informal. I know it is a small amount of people compared to what doctors say but I want to hear from real people who have been there. I was told by my doc that where before, when you tested for BC, it was once every 5 years if everything was okay. Now they say that is too often. Medical science changes. Real people know. I WILL have my test done since reading all of this. Sometimes it takes more than a pamphlet and a doc to jolt you into reality. I am calling this week.

Dayna
February 14th, 2014, 02:19 AM
I am 47 and I have had regular mammograms since I was 35 as I am rather large and lumpy naturally. My mom is one of eight. Two sisters have survived breast cancer, One brother passed with Lung cancer, one sister survived colon cancer, my mom survived melanoma, my grandma passed with ovarian cancer. My daddy died of colon cancer. My odds aren't real good to get through life without a touch of it in one form or another. So I get my paps and mamo every year and a coloscoply every three years. Have you seen the stories of young ladies being diagnosed with breast cancer, and they are attributing it to the young girls storing thier cell phones in their bras. One young ladies, tumor was found in the exact spot where she used to store her phone. Scary stuff!

mmingo777
February 14th, 2014, 01:01 PM
Hello souls60....I just joined this forum and wanted to respond to this post. I've survived two bouts and finally had them removed. My brca2 proved no gene and I'm the first in my family to have it. First time in 2000. Second time in 2008. I'll be 57 in May. Breastless, happy and healthy is a great place to be. Thanks be to God.

HandsOffItsMine
February 14th, 2014, 01:19 PM
(((MMingo777))) TaTas aren't everything! I still have mine but if it meant living or dying...the girls would go bye-bye!

Survivor of uterine and bc cancers now. We're very blessed and we have a sisterhood going in this Forum for all types of Survivors! :)

Huggers, Ruby

HandsOffItsMine
February 14th, 2014, 01:34 PM
BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing Fact Sheet - National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/BRCA)
Over here they have recently changed it so that the age when they stop doing the mammogram is raised. I think we do them at 4 yr intervals. I certainly don't think that's too often... The test Angelina Jolie had was a DNA test, to see if she was likely to get it. It's amazing what we can find out today! (Trying to stay positive here...)

We are being Positive...by sharing information that women need to get breast exams and paps. After a certain age, four years is too far apart according to many research reports now. Environment issues have come into play most likely.

You keep mentioning Angela Jolie, she had the BRCA1 and 2 done - they run over $3500 each on average. My doctor wants to run them too. My dad side has lung cancer, heart disease and diabetes now. I have no insurance and I don't have $7000 to confirm that I have a crappy family medical history. My dad however did survive mild heart attack at 55, he's 75 now, plays Squash 3-4 a week against 40 year olds and kicks their butts. :) He's a Dutch and World Tournament Referee. There is hope for me yet!! lol

Here's a Link to more info on the BRCA testing, some insurance companies will cover the cost for these test. This from the National Cancer Institute:

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/BRCA

mmingo777
February 15th, 2014, 02:22 PM
Thanks Ruby. I appreciate your words. I too, try to be an inspiration to those running that race with cancer. My oncologist gives my number to some women to be a source of support and help them understand all the procedures and effects they will go through. These are folks that usually have no family and are not comfortable in a support group. We are all blessed and are charged to help others

alliek
February 15th, 2014, 04:02 PM
I know recently, "statistics" have shown that mamograms do not "prevent" breast cancer any more than discovering it by yourself or whatever. First of all I laughed at the word "prevent". How could any kind of X ray,sonogram , etc prevent anything. It is to discover or see. If it wasn't for a mamogram in 1995 I probably wouldn't be typing this. My doctor "thought" he felt something. My tumor was way under my breast, and I had large,dense breasts. Going to the right mamography center was crucial,as they discovered the tumor. There was NO history in my family of this disease. My daughter is under 50. She has been having mamo's done every year since 40, due to my history as well as small but "lumpy" breast tissue. So far so good. Thumbs up for mamograms.