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View Full Version : Hey Sheena! - warning; long post . . . because I can be long winded . . .



Blondie
September 3rd, 2013, 05:50 PM
When I was in college I majored in English. Now, you can tell right quickly after reading some of my posts , that I was never good at grammar. But I love words. I like how some feel in my head, moving into my mouth, rolling off my tongue and resound to my ears when spoken. Some words are just FUN to say. Some words need to be reserved for just that right moment or occasion. Some words have become so overdone, they become trite and meaningless. These words of course, are the buzz words of the current generation that by the time we adults catch on, have become antiquated.

Where I live we have our own small vocabulary that is not necessarily unique to my town. However, after speaking with friends all over the nation, I have realized that not all folks understand English according this North Carolinian. So here now we have a short list of words and phrases that take on a different meaning where I live.
(DISCLAIMER: NOT ALL NORTH CAROLINIANS USE THESE WORDS. SOME ACTUALLY ARE HARDER TO DECIPHER THAN THIS. BUT IF YOU REALLY WANT TO BE BAFFLED BY WORDS, HEAD TO SOUTH CAROLINA; most notiby outside of Charleston where they speak "Geechy". S.C. gals - you know of which I speak)

Carry - while the rest of y'all are bringing a covered dish to a function, we here CARRY something "I will carry my squash casserole to the reunion."
Tote - can be interchanged with carry
Sack- a bag to carry things in.
Ill - you may consider this word to mean sick. To us it means bad mood, as in "I'm so ill, I can't even stand my own self!"

Curious- While you may think this word to describe someone being inquisitive, we know that it means people are strange or odd "Those Meeks' have always been right curious ways"

Ugly - now this one has the usual meaning as being hard on the eyes - y'all know what I mean when I say "That child is so ugly, the folks need to tie a pork chop 'round it's neck so the dog will play with it." Now, it also means someone is insensitive or acting badly, such as "That was just an ugly thing to say (or do)."

Be Smart - Every good little child around these parts hear these two words every day. It means behave yourself. "Now Johnny, I want you to be smart and stop acting ugly"

Poor - not only is this word used to describe poverty such as "They are so poor they don't have a pot nor window to throw it out of" it is also used to describe a condition of appearance, as in looking sick "She's a looking right poor. Her face tain't any bigger than my hand"

Might would or Might should means you ought to consider doing something. It is generally a response to a question put to you. As in, "You might should ask your husband if they think that is a good idea." To which the other person would respond, "I might would"(NOTE: I have been told by folks that they could recognize a person from NC just from these two phrases!)

Of course, there are sayings that are just fun to interject in conversation - if you have a hard time believing what someone is saying you can always add the disclaimer, "Well now, that dog don't hunt"

My sister and my daughter are Knee Babies because they are the youngest in the family.
I was never allowed to say Shut Up. I was taught to say Hush.

There are so many phrases that come to one in the midst of conversation. My ex husband would always tell me to get the South out of my Mouth. I kicked him to the curb. Actually, kicked him so high (in my mind) that he needed some feathers to touch ground again.

Now heckfire shoot. Hmmm. My Daddy would say that all the time. I don't think it is really a regional thing, I really think it is a Daddy-ism. Perhaps he heard it or read it somewhere.

Now, for all y'all over the pond and everywhere else. I love to watch British mysteries, comedies and the only thing I have to say is most of the time, I have to be immersed in the show and perhaps watch it again because y'all speak faster than my brain works. I ask my hubs, what did he just say?
Funny words to me? Bloody Hell, Wanker (still don't know what that means but I am assuming I can call certain politicians that and be safe).

I betcha that everyone can have a go at this thread. I mean, I have a cousin in Indiana who doesn't do laundry, she does "warshing".

Swedish leo
September 3rd, 2013, 06:16 PM
This and the other post with the similary topic is very educationally!

:D :icon_wave:

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 06:23 PM
Blondie, calling someone a wanker is pretty much like calling them a jerk-off in the States.

MayinJerset
September 3rd, 2013, 06:37 PM
I'm having too much fun reading both posts but have to leave for a meeting. Thanks Blondie, I'm all prepared in case I find myself in NC.

HandsOffItsMine
September 3rd, 2013, 07:27 PM
Blondie, you have out done yourself Sister! You had Don and I in stitches!! :D

Specially like UGLY and Might Should or Might Would - that one confused the H*LL out of me. lol

One day, there WILL be a road trip to NC 'cause we're going to The Hill. (((Blondie)))

Huggers, Ruby

Grandma G
September 3rd, 2013, 07:28 PM
Blondie - your post is too cute. I am originally from the Rhode Island/Massachusetts area as in born in Massachusetts but actually grew up in Rhode Island. My dear aunt married a guy from North Carolina and when they came to visit us Yankees I would love to listen to my uncle talk. I remember the first time he said softly to my aunt to "hush". I just stared at mu aunt and she smiled and said, "Hush is just a sugar coated shut up."

Here in Texas if we hand something to someone and tell them to put it up they know exactly what we are talking about. The first time I handed my niece back home something and told her to put it up she stared at me as if I had suddenly blossomed a third eye. I had to explain put it up meant put it away.

The first time I watched Pride & Prejudice I turned the sound up thinking that would help me understand what they were saying a little better. Had to watch it twice through before catching most of what was said. I love the accent but have to really concentrate when listening. I'm having an easier time with Downton Abbey.

Thanks for your post. Gave me a late in the day chuckle.

Patrice
September 3rd, 2013, 08:19 PM
Blonde I say heck fire shoot all the time too. People in Ga will also say Cut the light on or if they are getting ready to do something they will say I'm fixen to...... When we moved here from the north I told myself I will never talk like that. After thirty years of being brain washed I will use fixen. Lol

Blondie
September 3rd, 2013, 08:40 PM
Blonde I say heck fire shoot all the time too. People in Ga will also say Cut the light on or if they are getting ready to do something they will say I'm fixen to...... When we moved here from the north I told myself I will never talk like that. After thirty years of being brain washed I will use fixen. Lol

You know Patrice, I have lived all over the country and do not consider myself to have a very strong accent. When I get emotional, well, that is when it all gets overflowing. When I lived in Ca. people would say ' You must be from Georgia. Say Y'all". Imagine someone not knowing a Ga accent from a NC accent! And I don't generally say fixen - I say I am settin' to do.
Love dialects. Love words.

Miss Sheri
September 3rd, 2013, 08:54 PM
Ok, well I'm originally from Washington State, and they used to say that we didn't have any accents up there, but that we tended to pick up everyone else's accents. So as little kids, if we were playing with a friend who had out of town relatives show up, and we hung around for any lenth of time, we could be adding a Southwestern twang, a Southern drawl, or sounding like our fun neighbors to the 'North' [Canada] or the East ['Jersy' etc.]. My folks never knew what kind of an accent we would come home with.

Here in Utah, we tend to clip off some of the sounds in our words, such as Mountn, instead of Mountain.

Having Teenagers adds another new twist to our vocabulary. My youngest teenager [17 male] said, "Dude, chillaxe mom, I'm just givin ya boo!" Translation. : "Hey, Relax Mom, I'm just giving you some good natured verbal abuse!"

Also, "Sick" from my teens means: "total awesome!, I'm so, coveting that!"

{This thread is fun!}

alliek
September 3rd, 2013, 09:43 PM
:lol::lol: Love it Blondie, people around here (not so far from you) say I'm fixin to water the tomatoes with my" hose-pipe" and then they have to go to the "gas house" to fill the car.

MRoy
September 3rd, 2013, 10:44 PM
Curious- While you may think this word to describe someone being inquisitive, we know that it means people are strange or odd "Those Meeks' have always been right curious ways"

Blondie, this may just be in Ky, but here we say that folks with really curious ways are "queer" (pronounced like "square" without the "s" = "quare")... I say "ain't" and I say "y'all" but I don't say "you-uns". :) It's gettin' pert nigh (pretty near) time to hit the hay! :icon_sleep::icon_bored:

Lisapc
September 4th, 2013, 01:41 AM
I have to say that this is one of the best threads ever!

Slokarma
September 4th, 2013, 02:29 AM
Well, I reckon I should get on to bed, but I've been hankerin' for some pop all day. But first, I'm gonna ARN some clothes and then I'm gonna fold all those warshrags.

I'll never forget the girl across the street laughing at me for saying arn and warsh. Iron and Wash. I think that was over 50 years ago, but I haven't forgot.....My family came from Delbarton W Va and Greenup Ky. I didn't know they talked special in Columbus...:0 Then after 40 years in Columbus, I had people in the Youngstown area ask me where I was from cause I had a southern accent......REALLY? LOL.

bec
September 4th, 2013, 03:27 AM
I had a friend who recently giggled at me because I said that I might would do something. Sounded perfectly alright to me, but I guess they don't say that in Florida. LOL

My kids used to give my husband a hard time (because as he puts it...he's a hay seed, meaning he's very much a country boy) when we'd go to the forestry and he would ask if they wanted to climb the "far tar" (fire tower). The first time he said it they had no idea what he was talking about. He had to repeat it several times and finally point to it towering over the trees. Then when they figured it out, they just rolled in the floor. Guess they were taught how to pronounce words in elementary school. LOL! They still make fun of me because I was taught by my Eastern Kentucky mom and grandma to "grab that buggy" when we went shopping...which meant to get a shopping cart. When my daughter moved on the west coast, they had no clue what she meant. They had a "field day" with some of her language (meaning they had a great time teasing her about her language) .

Great post Blondie. BTW, I love your southern speech. When I read your posts, I often find myself putting that southern accent in my head!

easyquilts
September 4th, 2013, 05:51 AM
Wonderful! Some of those ways of speaking are so familiar to me.... My folks are all from Kentucky, Virginia, and West Virginia... Thanks for the "lesson"...

mgreen2427
September 4th, 2013, 06:34 AM
I love the British shows also. Love seeing the cultures also the "Bloody Hell" and "Wanker". I'm in Michigan and even though I do the "Laundry" I also "Warsh" my dishes. lol :icon_tup:

Andrea F
September 4th, 2013, 07:05 AM
This thread is really fun to read. And informative. We do have similar issues in Germany as well. I live pretty much in the middle of western Germany in an area we call Ruhrgebiet or Kohlenpott (charcoal pot) because this is the area where coal was produced for many many decades. My best friend is from Bavaria and she studied here. Besides our different accents we found so many different words or phrases that we considered to write a dictionary Kohlenpott - Bavarian some day.

Blondie
September 4th, 2013, 07:21 AM
This thread is really fun to read. And informative. We do have similar issues in Germany as well. I live pretty much in the middle of western Germany in an area we call Ruhrgebiet or Kohlenpott (charcoal pot) because this is the area where coal was produced for many many decades. My best friend is from Bavaria and she studied here. Besides our different accents we found so many different words or phrases that we considered to write a dictionary Kohlenpott - Bavarian some day.

Now I do believe that someone, somewhere at some time has written a dictionary for Southern Speak - that you would consider a German Dictionary for regional words would be gooder than grits. And for those who don't like grits but prefer hominy, well put that in your pipe and smoke it.

Slokarma
September 4th, 2013, 11:30 AM
BLOOMERS!:icon_wave: :lol:

pcbatiks
September 4th, 2013, 09:34 PM
I had a friend who recently giggled at me because I said that I might would do something. Sounded perfectly alright to me, but I guess they don't say that in Florida. LOL

My kids used to give my husband a hard time (because as he puts it...he's a hay seed, meaning he's very much a country boy) when we'd go to the forestry and he would ask if they wanted to climb the "far tar" (fire tower). The first time he said it they had no idea what he was talking about. He had to repeat it several times and finally point to it towering over the trees. Then when they figured it out, they just rolled in the floor. Guess they were taught how to pronounce words in elementary school. LOL! They still make fun of me because I was taught by my Eastern Kentucky mom and grandma to "grab that buggy" when we went shopping...which meant to get a shopping cart. When my daughter moved on the west coast, they had no clue what she meant. They had a "field day" with some of her language (meaning they had a great time teasing her about her language) .

Great post Blondie. BTW, I love your southern speech. When I read your posts, I often find myself putting that southern accent in my head!


Bec........your comments were too funny. I was "fixin to" write a comment the same thing! We visited friends in Indiana years ago and they ask if we wanted to go to the "far tar"........the what??? :D And I always grab a buggy when I go shopping..........never a cart! I also worked with a girl from Wyoming for awhile and we had this discussion about how to pronounce words. She told me in Wyoming they don't have wolves...........they have wuuuuves! :D I laughed and then we had the "buggy / cart" debate!

SallyO'Sews
September 5th, 2013, 12:42 AM
Heh, in Connecticut we put our groceries in the carriage! :D

auntiemern
September 5th, 2013, 01:26 AM
This thread and the other one are getting my funny bone. Actually Blondie doesn't have a strong southern accent. Me on the other hand grew up in St. Louis, and I sound like I'm from Arkansas, or some fictional southern place. Not so much the words I use but the sound of my voice. DH is always making fun of the way I speak. I say 'cabinet' and not 'cabnet'. I said sarup for years instead of surup' (syrup). According to him we play monoply and not monopoly. He has a tendancy to drop vowels, where as I say them with the vowels. Yep I grew up with warsh rags, and dish rags. Had no idea they were actually wash cloths and dish cloths.
I say things like 'you best be pickin' up those toys you got drug all over the place' instead of saying you 'better be' or 'you have'. I guess when those of us that are meeting up in October can try them all out in person. I may have to take a notebook, to remember it all.