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View Full Version : What do we English people say that makes you laugh?



Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 01:04 PM
My son and I were laughing because Blondie said 'What the heckfire shoot'.

Not in a nasty way, of course, just because it's not something said in England.

So, what do we say in England that makes you laugh in America (or anywhere else)?

bdmsmith
September 3rd, 2013, 01:12 PM
I can't think of anything specific but I don't know anyone from England. However, I love listening to English accents and think it's beautiful. The only saying or comment that I can think of is 'bloody hell' and that's because I love the Harry Potter books and movies and Ron said that all the time in the movies. In fact, the Harry Potter movies is what I have playing continuously in my sewing room because I have to have something on while I'm in there and it has to be something I like and I never get tired of watching these movies.

I'm sure as other people comment I will start remembering some phrases from movies, etc that was different. I'd never heard the saying that Blondie said.

Terri
September 3rd, 2013, 01:15 PM
My nephew met & married a girl from Scotland....and after a couple of yrs of marriage she was so homesick that they moved to Scotland. Now after many years of living there he sounds like a native and I have to ask for "translations" on many of the things he says. :) Many I just can't understand him with that heavy brogue of an accent and the speed at which he speaks!! It's almost funny at times.

nyscpa2be
September 3rd, 2013, 01:22 PM
My BIL was talking to his family the other day on FB, and one post they had was "I miss being in the Toon with you" What the heck is the toon?

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 01:27 PM
Heckfire shoot is not a common saying across America. I wonder if it is based on an old saying I'd heard before "shoot fire and save the matches." or in not so polite company sh!t fire ... And I'm not 100% sure of what that really means either.

Anyway, the one that I wonder about is "And Bob's your uncle." I've seen Divine Daisy say it here and I heard it on some British show on TV the other day, no clue what it means.

Judy~Ann
September 3rd, 2013, 01:28 PM
Lots of years ago .... we had a neighbor who was from England. Two things came to mind that made me smile. First.... one day she came over to borrow some cotton. I got her cotton balls.... but it turned out she wanted thread. Another time, our alarm clock was broken (old days before cell phones and such .... lol) ... so I asked her hubby to wake us. His reply..."Sure I'll come over and knock you up around 6 am." Hmmmm ... okay so we all had a good laugh about that translation. He was planning on knocking on the door and not what our young and evil minds first thought of. Have a grand day everyone... hugs to all

Hulamoon
September 3rd, 2013, 01:42 PM
lol We have some funny ones in Hawaii. I think it's a regional thing.

I think biscuits instead of cookies was interesting, because I was a baker for so long. Biscuits here are a bread. Then bonnet for a car 'hood' The differences are so interesting.

Madeforyouinma11
September 3rd, 2013, 01:44 PM
My BIL was talking to his family the other day on FB, and one post they had was "I miss being in the Toon with you" What the heck is the toon?

I'm thinking "toon" is "town" .
I chuckle at "heckfire shoot" too. I do think that is a southern thing. " bloody hell" makes me smile. I've heard it on Harry Potter but I hear it all the time from Chef Ramsey on Masterchef.
I can't really think of any off the top of my head, but I know I've laughed over some of the things Daisy has come out with, but it's usually in one of her stories..which ALWAYS makes me smile. I miss her stories.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 01:45 PM
Teresa, thank you for your reply. Although Ron is a child and says it in the film, he, in my opinion, says it in a way that indicates it's not what children say, (only adults). I've been a teacher for 12 years, including excluded children, and this is not a phrase I've heard children say and I was surprised to hear it in the film. But I live in the North of England so maybe it's more common down South.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 01:48 PM
Terri, yes, it can be difficult to understand!

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 01:49 PM
Amy, I've no idea!

nyscpa2be
September 3rd, 2013, 01:49 PM
lol We have some funny ones in Hawaii. I think it's a regional thing.

I think biscuits instead of cookies was interesting, because I was a baker for so long. Biscuits here are a bread. Then bonnet for a car 'hood' The differences are so interesting.

What about pudding, which is a steamed cake? Or a popover, a weird type of bread? Or a jelly trifle, made with Jello? I still can't figure out what potted shrimps are.

bakermom
September 3rd, 2013, 01:53 PM
along this line of thinking, many years ago i worked for a woman that was from Appalachia(coal country). she had a ton of sayings that i'd never heard. "happier than a possom on a log" "cuter than a speckled pup" "It's been so long since I ate my stomach thinks my throat's been cut".
she was the sweetest woman ever, i often thought she should have written a book about her life experiences, cause she lived a very interesting life

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 01:53 PM
karen, Bob's your uncle means - 'so there you go', 'so there you are' , 'the job is done',

for example :

you get your ingredients, mix them, cook them, take them out of the oven , and Bob's your uncle. ie the cake is cooked.

bakermom
September 3rd, 2013, 01:56 PM
thanks! i always wondered about that one, too.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 01:56 PM
Judy - knock you up is really funny!

easyquilts
September 3rd, 2013, 01:57 PM
I hear "and Bob's yout Uncle", only for, Bev Volfie, of You Tube... Love it. I love the British use of the word "brilliant"...

I do think each region of every country has it's own special waynof saying some things. ...I.e. "whatchamacallit, dohickey, thingy, dofloppy", etc....

My college roommie was from the Boston area, where a Coke is a tonic, and a milkshake is a frappe. At least that is how she used those words....

I do enjoy the Brotish TV series shown on Netflix.... They at so well done, and it's fun to hear a different way of speaking English.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 01:59 PM
Amy - potted shrimps are the little brown shrimps (not prawns) that are cooked and put in a small pot (ramekin size) and hot melted butter is poured over them to preserve them. You keep them on the fridge. I like to eat them on hot toast.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:03 PM
Amy - a 'pudding' can be a general term for a dessert or it can be a steamed pudding (eg spotted dick or jam rolly-polly), or even rice pudding. And I've no idea what a popover is.

A jelly trifle, mmm. sponge, fruit, sherry, jelly (jello not jam) topped with cold custard, cream, and sprinkles or angleica, and cherries. To be eaten at special occasions.

Hulamoon
September 3rd, 2013, 02:05 PM
This one here cracks me up "you know da kine" I can never attempt to explain it. It's "like you know'. I give up.lol

Da kine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Da_kine)

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 02:08 PM
(eg spotted dick or jam rolly-polly),

Well there ya go right there. Most Americans wouldn't eat anything called spotted dick ...

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:10 PM
Sandy - I've never heard dohickey or dofloppy, but other words for whatdyamacallit and thingy are doodah, thingymabob, and oojits .

So you might say 'Can you pass me the oojits?' when you want to say 'Can you pass me the scissors?' or something you can't think of the name of.

MRoy
September 3rd, 2013, 02:12 PM
along this line of thinking, many years ago i worked for a woman that was from Appalachia(coal country). she had a ton of sayings that i'd never heard. "happier than a possom on a log" "cuter than a speckled pup" "It's been so long since I ate my stomach thinks my throat's been cut".
she was the sweetest woman ever, i often thought she should have written a book about her life experiences, cause she lived a very interesting life

LOL! I'm from the foothills of Appalachia and country born and raised. I was often saying something at work that my coworkers had never heard before. Just proves you can take the girl out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the girl!

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 02:13 PM
Well there ya go right there. Most Americans wouldn't eat anything called spotted dick ...

Karen behave!! :icon_hihi:

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:14 PM
Karen - it's always a laugh here too. It used to be on the school menu but now it's called 'Currant sponge 'or something less funny.

In England we'd never say 'He hit me on my fanny.' for the same kind of reason. :)

pcbatiks
September 3rd, 2013, 02:14 PM
I hear "and Bob's yout Uncle", only for, Bev Volfie, of You Tube... Love it. I love the British use of the word "brilliant"...

I do think each region of every country has it's own special waynof saying some things. ...I.e. "whatchamacallit, dohickey, thingy, dofloppy", etc....

My college roommie was from the Boston area, where a Coke is a tonic, and a milkshake is a frappe. At least that is how she used those words....

I do enjoy the Brotish TV series shown on Netflix.... They at so well done, and it's fun to hear a different way of speaking English.

In southern Louisiana a coke includes all carbonated cold drinks...........as in "Do you want a coke?"........."Sounds good".........."What kind do you want?"............"I'll have a Dr Pepper." :D

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:15 PM
It's been so long since I ate my stomach thinks my throat's been cut".

Funnily enough we say this too.

Hulamoon
September 3rd, 2013, 02:15 PM
Pop overs are sort of a cream puff but not quite

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1079&bih=522&q=pop+overs&oq=pop+overs&gs_l=img.12...1923.7429.0.12624.9.9.0.0.0.0.318.15 18.0j7j1j1.9.0....0...1ac.1.26.img..1.8.1385.Ai7WV QPnhFM

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:17 PM
Pam - The Louisiana word for 'coke' here is 'pop'.

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 02:18 PM
Pam - The Louisiana word for 'coke' here is 'pop'.
It's pop here too, and some places call it soda

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 02:18 PM
Karen behave!! :icon_hihi:

Believe me, I was. If I posted what I had on the "tip of my tongue" I would have had to ban myself.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:19 PM
Lorie - I've google imaged popover and it's a Yorkshire Pudding! Is it made of batter and you cook it in hot oil in the oven?

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:20 PM
Oh Karen! You should eat spotted dick with custard.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:21 PM
Dolores - soda is just fizzy water! Surely :) and you drink it with whiskey.

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 02:22 PM
Oh Karen! You should eat spotted dick with custard.

:icon_rofl::icon_rofl::icon_rofl::icon_rofl::icon_ rofl:

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 02:24 PM
Dolores - soda is just fizzy water! Surely :) and you drink it with whiskey.

we have soda like that too, but my cousins in upstate New York always asked if they could have a soda, meaning coke or pepsi or whatever

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:26 PM
54975 popovers?
These have got to be Yorkshire puddings and you eat them with lamb and gravy and veg and roast spuds.... oh yum.

time: 18.26

twnkeyes
September 3rd, 2013, 02:30 PM
My husband is from England. We've been married almost 9 years and he still cracks me up sometimes! His main frustration are the names of tools. We go to Home Depot and he says he's looking for something and I have no clue what he's talking about. He has to describe it to me, what it does, if it has a blade, etc. The funniest thing though is one time he called when he was out of town. I asked how the weather was and he replied, "It's fixin' to rain." He had no idea that he was talking Texan as I laughed and laughed. When I told him he said, "Bloody hell!" definitely an English expression!

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:31 PM
I'm making a recipe booklet for my American friend and you have given me some good ideas, I have to say.

What else would you consider to be English food?

What do you think might be a word of phrase that you think is English food but aren't sure? eg scallops,
It's difficult to know for me as you quilters are my only contact with the rest of the world.

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 02:34 PM
:icon_rofl::icon_rofl::icon_rofl::icon_rofl::icon_ rofl:

Dolores, I know your mind is in the same gutter as mine. Now stop!

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:35 PM
twnkeyes - I just asked my son (aged 13 yrs) what does 'It's fixin to rain.' mean, and he had no idea. I've just explained it too him and he's trying it out in his best Texan accent (you'd not recognise it I'm sure!).

As I've said above BH is definately an adult English expletive.

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 02:36 PM
Dolores, I know your mind is in the same gutter as mine. Now stop!

:icon_tape: :icon_rolleyes: :icon_heh:

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:36 PM
Now then you naughty girls! Post your pictures of what you think 'spotted dick' is!
Out your money where your mouth is!

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 02:38 PM
Now then you naughty girls! Post your pictures of what you think 'spotted dick' is!
Out your money where your mouth is!
Karen would ban me for sure

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 02:38 PM
I'm making a recipe booklet for my American friend and you have given me some good ideas, I have to say.

What else would you consider to be English food?

What do you think might be a word of phrase that you think is English food but aren't sure? eg scallops,
It's difficult to know for me as you quilters are my only contact with the rest of the world.

We have scallops.

Yorkshire Pudding, bubble and squeak (?), a lot of your desserts have different names. Fish and chips, here it would be fish and french fries, chips are like potato chips, crispy things in a bag.

This reminds me when a bunch of my friends in the States were on video chat with a friend in New Zealand and we all were running to the kitchen to grab food items to show each other. I grabbed a box of Stove Top stuffing because John just couldn't understand it.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:39 PM
54976
SPOTTED DICK AND CUSTARD so there!

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 02:39 PM
Heinz Spotted Dick Sponge Pudding (9.4 oz) ???????????? well, that didn't work so well LOL was supposed to be a picture of a can of spotted dick pudding
https://www.mysupermarket.com/landingpages/product.aspx?productid=219555&skipregister=true&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Search_US&utm_campaign=Google&utm_content=CPC48303&banner=248303

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:45 PM
Bubble and squeak is leftover cooked cabbage and potatoes shallow fried.

French fries are very thin chips.

Chips are slices of potato deep fried.

Crisps are very thin slices of potato (roundish) deep fried.

But what is Stove Top stuffing?

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 02:46 PM
"Fixin' to" is Texan-speak for getting ready to. It's getting ready to rain = It's fixin' to rain.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:47 PM
Dolores - this piccie didn't come up but the link did and I looked at the piccie. I have to say I wouldn't dream of buying it in a tin, but yes, that's a piccie of spotted dick.

debinmalaga
September 3rd, 2013, 02:48 PM
I laugh at how you say "aluminum" in England - as I recall, it was "alum-in-ium"

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:49 PM
Karen - I think my son will be using the word 'fixin' to decsribe everything he's about to do.

I'll say he's fixin to get his backside tanned! (a smack on his bum)

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:51 PM
Deb - not too bad. al-im-in-ee-um.

Make sure the start is a sharp al not ayul. And the end is a short um not uhhm.

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 02:51 PM
Bubble and squeak is leftover cooked cabbage and potatoes shallow fried.

French fries are very thin chips.

Chips are slices of potato deep fried.

Crisps are very thin slices of potato (roundish) deep fried.

But what is Stove Top stuffing?

Crisps are what we call potato chips. French fries here are sticks of potatoes, deep fried.

Stove Top stuffing is sort of an instant type of bread stuffing with all the seasonings, celery, onions, etc. that you just add boiling water to and let it rehydrate. Simple and fast rather than making it from scratch. American most often have stuffing with their Thanksgiving turkeys. They make it from dried bread, celery, onions, sage and other spices, stock to moisten and them stuff it in the cavity of the bird before roasting.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:51 PM
Keep trying!

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:52 PM
Karen - yes I know what you mean. It's just called stuffing here.

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 02:54 PM
[QUOTE=But what is Stove Top stuffing?[/QUOTE]

Stove Top (http://www.kraftbrands.com/stovetop/varieties-boxed.html)

sometimes it is called dressing. what you would stuff a turkey with, but this is a boxed kind

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:55 PM
We love it when Jenny describes a quilt as 'darling'.

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 02:55 PM
It's sad that Stove Top has it's own website.

Stove Top (http://www.kraftbrands.com/stovetop/index.html)


Ha, after I hit enter I see Dolores is in my head!

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:56 PM
aluminium - ah-looooo-min-um. That's so funny. It's like a different word.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 02:57 PM
Karen - I can't believe it! It's just stuffing. And you can make it so easily and cheaply yourself.

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 02:59 PM
It's sad that Stove Top has it's own website.

Stove Top (http://www.kraftbrands.com/stovetop/index.html)


Ha, after I hit enter I see Dolores is in my head!

:icon_tup:

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 03:00 PM
Do you know what a bobowler is?

Do you use this word?

mommadeb
September 3rd, 2013, 03:03 PM
Telling someone they are "cheeky".

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 03:03 PM
Do you know what a bobowler is?

Do you use this word?

never heard that word, but google says it is a really ugly moth. LOL

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 03:10 PM
Yes, one of those big moths ((shudder)). But of course it might have other meanings too.

Well, it's 19.07 and I'm going to nip t' corner shop f' whiskey. Then come back and do the ironing of the boys' new school uniform for school tomorrow and then knit socks and watch TV.

nyscpa2be
September 3rd, 2013, 03:11 PM
Karen - I can't believe it! It's just stuffing. And you can make it so easily and cheaply yourself.

And there is a debate as to what tasted better - Stovetop or homemade. I was raised on homemade, the recipe that is on the side of the Bells Seasoning box, and can't stand the seasonings in Stovetop - too much chicken bullion and salt for me. But other areas of the US are the same about premade vs homemade products - salsa, tortillas, pretty much any mexican food, but then get into a frozen vs scratch pie or cake, or even worse, a mac & cheese battle, and the wars can rage! Telling a southern boy that his mama don't know how to make Mac and Cheese - I wouldn't want to be there for the battle! thought it would probably be funny!

bkthomas
September 3rd, 2013, 03:21 PM
Ok, this thread is very interesting.....so here's my story;

I am from Minnesota and I moved to Texas with the rest of the family in '83 - now in Minnesota in the winter we would go sledding....you either had a sled or a long toboggan that you would ride down the hill on.

Now I am in Texas, working in a little variety store and it is just beginning to snow a little bit outside when a man comes in and asks for a toboggan! I'm thinking, there is not nearly enough snow and I haven't seen any hills.... I told him no....he starts looking on his own (twnkeyes you know where I'm going with this) and says "Here they are!" I hurry over to where he is and he had a knit cap in his hand!!! Really!!!! A knit cap is a toboggan in Texas?!!!

OH MY GOSH.....another good one; this same Texas town, I had a job in a sewing factory and the lady was showing me what to do - she said to "mash" down on the foot pedal and on those high powered machines, I thought you don't "mash" down on it you gently press on it!
I got the funniest looks from people for years from them whenever I spoke to them - they would kinda back up and say "where are you from?" After awhile though that stopped happening so often, but then once in a while it would happen again and I would say well I say "over yonder and y'all"....don't I sound Texan?
The hardest thing for me to understand was when they said...oil....sounded like....erl

Hulamoon
September 3rd, 2013, 03:31 PM
Yes, one of those big moths ((shudder)). But of course it might have other meanings too.

Well, it's 19.07 and I'm going to nip t' corner shop f' whiskey. Then come back and do the ironing of the boys' new school uniform for school tomorrow and then knit socks and watch TV.

Nip reminded me of 'nip it the bud'

The popover came from here or England? I need to go look that up now:)

pcbatiks
September 3rd, 2013, 03:36 PM
"Fixin' to" is Texan-speak for getting ready to. It's getting ready to rain = It's fixin' to rain.

Hey, hey, hey..........don't be making fun of "fixin' to" :D .............we say that all the time! As in I'm "fixin' to" go get me a coke and then I'm going to the store.........get a buggy......and do some shopping! By the way......a few of my relatives that live in Cajun Country will go to the store or to a friends house and "get down" meaning.......get out of the car! :D

It's kind of funny that some of the English words I've heard used before came from watching episodes of Fraiser!

bdmsmith
September 3rd, 2013, 03:37 PM
The other word that seems to be used differently in English is 'curious'----I heard that used in HP a lot too but have also heard other English celebrities use it.

As for food:
Streusel---We have streusels here in the US and it's similar I'm sure to what is done overseas but I don't think it's as popular or well made unless you go to a good bakery. However, I saw this first in an Elvis Presley movie when he was in Germany (GI Blues) and it was a really popular item. When I think about it though I also seem to think it is an England dish but maybe not.

Also Bangers and Mash---I'm not sure if this is an England or Irish dish but I heard of this in a movie also and thought it sounded weird.

pcbatiks
September 3rd, 2013, 03:40 PM
Sheena........here is one for you son. Do you know what "jeet" means in southern language?

jeet - means "Did you eat?" Run all 3 words together and this is what you get! :lol:

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 03:44 PM
my southern EX dil from Alabama always said she was going to carry (take) her son to ---- and then she would tote (carry) the groceries in the house

Hulamoon
September 3rd, 2013, 03:53 PM
And there is a debate as to what tasted better - Stovetop or homemade. I was raised on homemade, the recipe that is on the side of the Bells Seasoning box, and can't stand the seasonings in Stovetop - too much chicken bullion and salt for me. But other areas of the US are the same about premade vs homemade products - salsa, tortillas, pretty much any mexican food, but then get into a frozen vs scratch pie or cake, or even worse, a mac & cheese battle, and the wars can rage! Telling a southern boy that his mama don't know how to make Mac and Cheese - I wouldn't want to be there for the battle! thought it would probably be funny!

When I was on the mainland I had a chance to buy a tortilla press. Those things are heavy! We have a local company that makes them though. Same with the salsa, actually a friend owns The Kauai Salsa company, so that is the only one I buy because it's fresh. Tomatos are so expensive! I keep forgetting to go to the farmers markets. Now mac and cheese is a whole different ball game (that should go in the language thread, lol) When I made some it was a fortune to make. I was using gruyere cheese. Boy $$$!

Learner quilter
September 3rd, 2013, 03:58 PM
Oh Karen! You should eat spotted dick with custard.
I have just had some after my dinner mmmmmmmm.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 04:07 PM
Thank you Pam. He's trying that one out. 'Jeet it mate? Jeet it?'

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 04:11 PM
Lorie - nip means the same as 'to pop over' ie to pay a quick visit to a place (including the toilet).

Do you eat popovers with meat?

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 04:16 PM
Teresa - to say 'That's curious.' means that's strange or interesting. To be 'curious' as an adjective means somebody is out of the ordinary, and as a verb 'He is curious.' means he wants to know about something. It has the overall meaning of the desire to find out about something.

Bangers and mash - bangers are sausages and mash is potato. You get a big mountain of potato and poke sausages into the side of it then share it out.

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 04:21 PM
Lorie, I couldn't find the company on google but found lots of lovely pictures of Kauai. The beaches look fantastic.

Why are tomatoes so expensive? Do they not grow well there?

HandsOffItsMine
September 3rd, 2013, 04:26 PM
This one here cracks me up "you know da kine" I can never attempt to explain it. It's "like you know'. I give up.lol

Da kine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Da_kine)

I love the local commercial in Hawaii where the male mechanic doesn't know the car part and said "you know da kine" and the pretty girl walks up and say "Oh that's the Intake manifold" Or what ever it is, and they all go "Oh yeah da kine!" lol

When we first arrived on the Island we went "What?!?" :D

Sheena
September 3rd, 2013, 04:28 PM
Well, it's 20.26 here and it's time to get ready for bed. The hens are away (ie in the coop), the cats and the dog are fed and watered, school uniform is ready for tomorrow. But it's only early afternoon for you, so enjoy the rest of your day and continue to post.

Night night God Bless.

HandsOffItsMine
September 3rd, 2013, 04:28 PM
Karen behave!! :icon_hihi:

ROFLOL That will NEVER happen! lol

SuzyQue
September 3rd, 2013, 04:31 PM
I must admit that I shared an expression with my kiddos after I quit chuckling about it myself. It stuck here and my kiddos often repeat it and we all giggle. I think it was from Daisy, but not 100% on that. The thread was about a child that wasn't behaving and the phrase that we all loved is....."thawattled her bum" . I love hearing all the sayings from all over the country and now the world!

Learner quilter
September 3rd, 2013, 04:48 PM
Well, it's 20.26 here and it's time to get ready for bed. The hens are away (ie in the coop), the cats and the dog are fed and watered, school uniform is ready for tomorrow. But it's only early afternoon for you, so enjoy the rest of your day and continue to post.

Night night God Bless.
Are you not watching The Great British Bake Off with Mr Hollywood ?

Pandabear
September 3rd, 2013, 04:50 PM
I'm not sure if this one was posted yet.. someone on the board said something in a thread about feeling like 'a right Charley' (I think that's how it went). I still have no clue what that one means.

Lonna
September 3rd, 2013, 05:29 PM
Pam over here in South East Louisiana we make grocerys, axe our mama's and head to the house.

Hulamoon
September 3rd, 2013, 05:30 PM
I say curious(strange) little creatures aren't they?

I don't know why tomatos are so expensive.I'm going to the famers market to see the difference and maybe get my garden back together!

54992


I know Ruby, that is a funny one mostly because the girl is smarter. lol

bakermom
September 3rd, 2013, 05:38 PM
"Bubble and squeak is leftover cooked cabbage and potatoes shallow fried."

I always pictured this as cabbage and sausage.

pcbatiks
September 3rd, 2013, 06:23 PM
Pam over here in South East Louisiana we make grocerys, axe our mama's and head to the house.

Hey Lonna.........that's funny :D I've never heard "make groceries" ...........the other two I heard plenty of times.........my aunt & her family say "head to the house" after the "get down" at the store! If someone knocks on her door she would say......"someone's to the front door".

Years ago we had someone point out to us that we said "Come see...." a lot......as in "come see if this quilt looks okay." The person that mentioned this was from Wisconsin, I think and thought it was funny. :) I never realized that was considered odd because we have always said that. :)

Bubby
September 3rd, 2013, 06:32 PM
The ones that make me smile are Lift (elevator), biscuits (cookies), cushions (Pillows) and wadding (batting for your quilt). Many English people speak very fast and for a country woman like me is a bit unsettling. Of course where I live we say tar for tire, ool for oil, warsh for wash, wrench for rinse and supper for dinner! One thing we all express the same is a Smile!

Hulamoon
September 3rd, 2013, 07:00 PM
I used to laugh and tease my mom and aunt. They were from Chicago. They would say warsh instead of wash the dishes.

lauratreky@comcast.net
September 3rd, 2013, 07:45 PM
I love the word "nappies" for diapers!:D

Blondie
September 3rd, 2013, 08:17 PM
Wellsir, I am rather red in the face because when I came into the forum a bit ago, I was reading this morning's thread and read your comment. Now I see this thread . . . sure didn't mean to add to the cornfusion of common thoughts. Now I will have to read all the responses and get back with you. I am certain all of our bestest friends here set you straight?


My son and I were laughing because Blondie said 'What the heckfire shoot'.

Not in a nasty way, of course, just because it's not something said in England.

So, what do we say in England that makes you laugh in America (or anywhere else)?

Blondie
September 3rd, 2013, 08:22 PM
Heckfire shoot is not a common saying across America. I wonder if it is based on an old saying I'd heard before "shoot fire and save the matches." or in not so polite company sh!t fire ... And I'm not 100% sure of what that really means either.
.

Knowing my Daddy, perhaps it meant both. There are times when you are so confounded only a good heckfire shoot will do. Another thing my Granny would say when she was confounded, dumb struck or otherwise speechless "Good Night Irene, I reckon, God Bless." That was all her.

PeggyM
September 3rd, 2013, 08:29 PM
Lots of years ago .... we had a neighbor who was from England. Two things came to mind that made me smile. First.... one day she came over to borrow some cotton. I got her cotton balls.... but it turned out she wanted thread. Another time, our alarm clock was broken (old days before cell phones and such .... lol) ... so I asked her hubby to wake us. His reply..."Sure I'll come over and knock you up around 6 am." Hmmmm ... okay so we all had a good laugh about that translation. He was planning on knocking on the door and not what our young and evil minds first thought of. Have a grand day everyone... hugs to all


Hahaha. Knock you up came to my mind. In the US that means getting someone pregnant.

Blondie
September 3rd, 2013, 08:30 PM
Oh Karen! You should eat spotted dick with custard.

Thank goodness I make my sweet tea up by the gallon. I just spewed half of it on my monitor.
Karen, I double dog dare you.

lourixe
September 3rd, 2013, 08:36 PM
My language skills are improving a lot. I remember when I first visited England to learn the language they would call "hoover" the machine that I found is called "vacuum cleaner" in the US.

Divine Daisy
September 3rd, 2013, 08:41 PM
My BIL was talking to his family the other day on FB, and one post they had was "I miss being in the Toon with you" What the heck is the toon?

The toon is the town lol.

Meaning his misses having a night out on the town.

Geordie:)

Divine Daisy
September 3rd, 2013, 08:42 PM
laughs..........means ............and there you go.......job done........ da daaaaaaaaaaaa

Divine Daisy
September 3rd, 2013, 09:01 PM
ok, having finally reached the end of this thread, I realise that Sheena answered the questions I did as I read..........sorry to repeat.

Except for 'feeling a right charlie' this means feeling an idiot.

I am afraid Bloody Hell is a frequently used expression around here. I could give you many more but Karen would ban me sighs.

I have a few more though......... seeing dark rain cloud rolling in we say........'its dark over Bob's mother's.' .....ie, get the washing in before it rains

'getting to the nitty gritty'............ getting to the point
'finding the porcupine's spines'............as above
'she's no better than she ought to be'........... she's a bit of a......er......um............can't think of a word that won't get me 'Karen'd!
'all fur coat and no knickers' ....................kind of like above but less so

I could go on but won't lol

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 09:06 PM
[QUOTE=............can't think of a word that won't get me 'Karen'd!
[/QUOTE]

:icon_scared: :icon_tape: :icon_giggle:

MartinaG
September 3rd, 2013, 09:08 PM
I love it when the TV has a special about Britain (or parts thereabout) and they show subtitles. Sometimes they are necessary.

When I moved from Germany to California my language skills were pretty good but I did miss some of the common sayings. Needless to say DH stopped me when I was going over to tell the neighbor to shut up his rooster "or I am going to choke his chicken." I also thought that a word in both languages probably means the same thing - NOT! I thought "douching" meant to take a shower.

In another forum, a German gal was invited to a pot luck and she didn't know what that was. Someone mentioned she should bring her favorite dish. She did - her green plate. She didn't realize that "dish" meant something edible.

Another gal told her husband to enquire with the neighbors how large the garage was that they had on the sign for sale.

I watch the BBC programs a lot so I am getting better at understanding the "true" English language.

But if someone was to tell me about a spotted dick, I'd send them to the doctor. lol

Miss Sheri
September 3rd, 2013, 09:11 PM
You guys have me sitting here with tears running down my face, gasping for breath and laughing out loud! DANG, I LOVE THIS FORUM!

Doloris
September 3rd, 2013, 09:12 PM
You guys have me sitting here with tears running down my face, gasping for breath and laughing out loud! DANG, I LOVE THIS FORUM!

Me too!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 09:17 PM
'she's no better than she ought to be'........... she's a bit of a......er......um............can't think of a word that won't get me 'Karen'd!
'all fur coat and no knickers' ....................kind of like above but less so

I could go on but won't lol

Hmmm ... tart?

Divine Daisy
September 3rd, 2013, 09:21 PM
Hmmm ... tart?

THATS what I was going to use but wasn't sure!

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 09:22 PM
I also thought that a word in both languages probably means the same thing - NOT! I thought "douching" meant to take a shower.

It's like an inside out shower, or would that be outside in?



But if someone was to tell me about a spotted dick, I'd send them to the doctor. lol

Hahaha, you just found a polite way to say what I've been thinking all day long!

K. McEuen
September 3rd, 2013, 09:23 PM
THATS what I was going to use but wasn't sure!

Over here a tart is a small pie like dessert. Hehe, I knew what you were trying to say.

ilive2craft2
September 3rd, 2013, 09:30 PM
You guys are just too funny! Love hearing the different expressions - we all speak the same language, but sometimes need a dictionary for the regional uses of the same words.

So a spotted dick is a type of pudding? Hmmm - learn something new every day. That is one of the phrases I have heard, but have not had the nerve to ask about.

We love to watch the british comedy tv shows on our local PBS stations - I know they are old re-runs for you guys, but we do still love them. :)

Precious1
September 3rd, 2013, 10:04 PM
You guys have had me laughing so loud my sides hurt. Love this forum and love the comradery(sp). Spanish is my second language and it amazes me how different Puertorican Spanish is from Mexican Spanish, Columbian Spanish and even Castillian Spanish. But we still can communicate. That is what I brought out of this thread. That no matter what part of the world we are from, we can still communicate. :)

auntiemern
September 4th, 2013, 01:09 AM
This thread has been the highlight of my day. Laughed my a$$ off at some of the responses. Got me to thinking about the things we say every day without thinking a thing about it. But to someone else, it would sound funny, or they wouldn't even understand. I remember a friend from HS the first time she came to my house. My mom had her laughing so hard at the things she said. To me it was just every day language. Most of what comes to mind would immediately be removed though.

Lisapc
September 4th, 2013, 01:17 AM
I hear "and Bob's yout Uncle", only for, Bev Volfie, of You Tube... Love it. I love the British use of the word "brilliant"...

I do think each region of every country has it's own special waynof saying some things. ...I.e. "whatchamacallit, dohickey, thingy, dofloppy", etc....



My college roommie was from the Boston area, where a Coke is a tonic, and a milkshake is a frappe. At least that is how she used those words....

I do enjoy the Brotish TV series shown on Netflix.... They at so well done, and it's fun to hear a different way of speaking English.

A coke is a soda, a milkshake is made with ice cream and a frappe is milk and flavoring.

Strangely enough here in MA you can tell what town someone was raised in by the way they speak. I tend to speak like I am from Boston/Allston because my mother is from the North End and Allston. My Dad is from Tyngsboro and he has some sayings that my mother will never understand. Very strange this place called Massachusetts.

brook
September 4th, 2013, 02:19 AM
So glad you started this thread. It's been a kick (fun) to read! : )

Suzyq
September 4th, 2013, 09:09 AM
Hahaha! This post is getting funnier by the minute! Well my hubby is a Brit and has made me laugh over our 20 yrs of marriage with his funny expressions. I too love the British shows but have to get him to translate for me.. It seems like the Brits get away with a lot more in their programs than we ever would here in Canada, rats! Ha!

Learner quilter
September 4th, 2013, 12:06 PM
Is your Husband English or Scottish? We have Scottish programmes here that need translating for non Scots.

mamaquilt
September 4th, 2013, 01:49 PM
Karen behave!! :icon_hihi:

there you go, you Americans, always thinking bad.

mamaquilt
September 4th, 2013, 02:12 PM
had fun reading this thread. Thanks to you all for the entertaining half hour. Learned quite a lot

GuitarGramma
September 4th, 2013, 02:15 PM
Here's one that confused me in Australia. An Aussie mom said to me, "When the weather gets cold, you'll want to buy your daughters some skivvies."

After pondering this for awhile, I said, "What are 'skivvies' over here? Because in America, 'skivvies' are ugly men's underwear."

Long explanation ensued until I said, "Oh, we call those turtlenecks."

Another American mom in AU went to a clothing shop and asked where were the turtlenecks. They directed her down the street -- to a fish shop!

PS. I apologize for what look like incorrect quotation marks and inverted commas. We seem to do these backwards in America. Oh! There's another one, "Inverted commas."

shannonsaulter
September 4th, 2013, 02:21 PM
when we did our day trip to N. Ireland the tour guide was calling the other drivers fecking idiots..Loved it!

Judy~Ann
September 4th, 2013, 02:40 PM
I've always loved that one lol

Judy~Ann
September 4th, 2013, 02:41 PM
Still makes me laugh to think about it

Judy - knock you up is really funny!

Judy~Ann
September 4th, 2013, 02:44 PM
After many years in Hawaii... I definitely know 'da kine' ... da bes kine day is when no moa pilikia......
This one here cracks me up "you know da kine" I can never attempt to explain it. It's "like you know'. I give up.lol

Da kine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Da_kine)

Judy~Ann
September 4th, 2013, 02:49 PM
almost all of Jenny's quilts are ........ "Isn't this JUST darling?" lol..

Judy~Ann
September 4th, 2013, 02:54 PM
Or another version is Jeetjet? did you eat yet
Thank you Pam. He's trying that one out. 'Jeet it mate? Jeet it?'

Sheena
September 4th, 2013, 02:59 PM
Good afternoon everyone. It's 18.57 here.

Pandabear - 'to feel a proper Charlie' mean you feel like a fool ie you've done something silly.

Sheena
September 4th, 2013, 03:03 PM
Bubby - it's a good thing we're not talking face to face! We'd never understand each other.

My 14 year old son came home from school asking for some 'dwadding' to take into school. Not knowing what it was I asked him to repeat exactly what the teacher had asked for. And the reply? ' some soft wadding' !

Sheena
September 4th, 2013, 03:07 PM
Blondie - you've done it again! 'double dog dare'. That's going to be said a lot in our house.

Sheena
September 4th, 2013, 03:09 PM
Divine daisy - 'it's snowing down south' - your petticoat is showing (not used much these days!)

Sheena
September 4th, 2013, 03:12 PM
Karen - tart? should be eaten with custard? :)

Sheena
September 4th, 2013, 03:16 PM
Judy - we like jeetjet too. :)

Sheena
September 4th, 2013, 03:19 PM
I'm glad this thread has caused so much laughter.

Just one more ' The cat's dead over.' means the cat's fast asleep.

Oh and one more to 'side up' means to tidy the plates etc off the dining table. And 'side away' means to put things or something away. e.g. 'I'll just side away my sewing machine.' (although that's not likely!)

Pandabear
September 4th, 2013, 03:57 PM
Good afternoon everyone. It's 18.57 here.

Pandabear - 'to feel a proper Charlie' mean you feel like a fool ie you've done something silly.

Thank you for explaining. Seems like I always feel like a 'proper Charlie' then! :)

bakermom
September 4th, 2013, 04:26 PM
Here you "red the table" if you are cleaning it off or setting it
I have also heard "snowing down south" and "your barn door is open" here (midwest)

MartinaG
September 4th, 2013, 04:27 PM
Karen - tart? should be eaten with custard? :)
...and spotted dick comes with clotted cream.

I recently had to ask my Irish friend what "Tosser" means. It is used as a derogatory term in some programs. I thought it meant "old fart" or something like that. Must admit the answer made me blush.

Then I learned that "take away" is what we call "take out" - I always wondered what the Brits were taking away and where were they taking it? lol

Hulamoon
September 4th, 2013, 04:30 PM
I like the word crikey. How did that come about?

Musical_Starling
September 4th, 2013, 09:02 PM
This thread and the other one Blondie started are cracking me up!! We have so many weird expressions and words, and I can see by this thread that they're borrowed from all over the world. In one of my college classes we all introduced ourselves and where we were from, and when I said I was from the west coast of the province my teacher said "I was over that way once and ordered an egg salad sandwich at Subway. When I asked for onion I got the response 'My 'unney, dere's halready honion hin da hegg!'" And I laughed SO hard because, although I try my best not to speak with an accent, that's pretty dead on for people from my area lol

I say some funny stuff though, and DH catches me every time and pokes fun. It gets worse after I've been talking to my Mom on the phone lol But I use words like "yaffle" (an armful of something, usually wood or fish), or terms like "Well ain't that a fine kettle of fish!" (which is usually sarcasm, like saying "Well isn't THAT lovely!") But we Newfies are known for having the world's shortest conversation... "Arn?" "N'arn!" Which is something that would be said years ago by two passing fishing vessels meaning "Did you catch any fish?" "No, not even one!" And everyone pokes fun at Canadians for their use of "eh" but here it's less "eh" and more "b'y", so you'll hear lots of "Yes b'y" or "How's she goin' b'y?". And we also sometimes refer to people as "me ole c*ck" and it's meant to be endearing lol But we use a lot of Irish/Scottish/English words and sayings and add h's in front of words and drop them in front of other words. Here on the east coast we joke that they dropped their H in 'olyrood and picked it up in h'Avondale.

Plus we have a town named Dildo, and we think that's TOTALLY normal! lol

MRoy
September 4th, 2013, 09:25 PM
I'm totally enjoying this thread....belly laughs and all!!

K. McEuen
September 4th, 2013, 10:24 PM
Has anyone else noticed that Sheena thinks everything should be eaten with custard? ;)

SallyO'Sews
September 5th, 2013, 12:13 AM
This is so much fun! I've been laughing out loud, but cannot bring myself to read some of these out loud to my family...:D

When I was 6 years old in 1965, my dad was transferred by his employer from New Orleans, LA, to London, England. One of his jobs in his new office was to "translate" the Telexes (that's sort of a precursor to the fax machine for you young 'uns) from American to British English and vice-versa. But after about 6 months they had to get a new guy to translate, as by that time, Dad was too Anglicized.

What got to me was that my friends called their mothers "Mummy," which in the US is a dead person who has been wrapped in long strips of linen and laid to rest in an Egyptian pyramid.

What got to my mother was the time I came home from school and announced that the week's spelling list included many homonyms. She had a hard time wrapping her Texan brain around the thought that "caught" and "court" are pronounced the same way!

Hulamoon
September 5th, 2013, 12:56 AM
I heard a really funny one just a few minutes ago. I was in a little store and this girl and I were trying to pass each other (small isles) and saying sorry. So I said I never know which way to go because in a car you are always on the right (in the US) So she blurted out something and I half way heard it and asked what did you just say?......

I know.. I don't whither to wind my butt or scratch my watch. :icon_rofl:

I told her about this conversation and how funny it was getting She said her mom was from Indiana. Anyone hear that one before?
.

auntiemern
September 5th, 2013, 01:05 AM
I dang near choked over this one.
[QUOTE=MartinaG;375801][QUOTE...and spotted dick comes with clotted cream. QUOTE/]

Poppytree
September 5th, 2013, 05:59 AM
Here's some SLANG for you (a few are a bit rude, sorry)


Ace - If something is ace it is awesome. I used to hear it a lot in Liverpool. Kids thought all cool stuff was ace, or brill.
Aggro - Short for aggravation, it's the sort of thing you might expect at a football match. In other words - trouble! There is sometimes aggro in the cities after the pubs shut!

All right? - This is used a lot around London and the south to mean, "Hello, how are you"? You would say it to a complete stranger or someone you knew. The normal response would be for them to say "All right"? back to you. It is said as a question. Sometimes it might get expanded to "all right mate"? Mostly used by blue collar workers but also common among younger people.

Anti-clockwise - The first time I said that something had gone anti-clockwise to someone in Texas I got this very funny look. It simply means counter-clockwise but must sound really strange to you chaps! I think he thought I had something against clocks!

Any road - Up north (where they talk funny!!) instead of saying anyway, they say "any road"! Weird huh?

Arse - This is a word that doesn't seem to exist in America. It basically means the same as ass, but is much ruder. It is used in phrases like "pain in the arse" (a nuisance) or I "can't be arsed" (I can't be bothered) or you might hear something was "a half arsed attempt" meaning that it was not done properly.

Arse about face - This means you are doing something back to front.

Arse over elbow - This is another way of saying head over heels but is a little more descriptive. Usually happens after 11pm on a Saturday night and too many lagers! Some Americans say ass over teakettle apparently!

Arse over tit - Another version of arse over elbow, but a bit more graphic!

Arsehole - Asshole to you. Not a nice word in either language.

Arseholed - Drunk! Usually in the advanced stages of drunken stupor, someone would be considered "completely arseholed". Never me, of course!

As well - You chaps say also when we would say "too" or "as well". For instance if my friend ordered a Miller Lite, I would say "I'll have one as well". I often heard people saying something like "I'll have one also". You'd be more likely to hear someone in England ordering a pint of lager!

Ass - Your backside, but mostly a donkey!

Au fait - Another one of those French expressions that have slipped into the English language. This one means to be familiar with something. I'd say at the end of reading all this you'd be au fait with the differences between American and English!

Baccy - Tobacco. The sort you use to roll your own.

Bang - Nothing to do with your hair - this is a rather unattractive way of describing having sex. Always gets a smile from Brits in American hair dressers when they are asked about their bangs.

Barmy - If someone tells you that you're barmy they mean you have gone mad or crazy. For example you'd have to be barmy to visit England without trying black pudding!

Beastly - You would call something or somebody beastly if they were really nasty or unpleasant. Most people would consider you a snob or an upper class git if you used this word. People like Fergie can get away with it though.

Bees Knees - This is the polite version of the dog's bollocks. So if you are in polite company and want to say that something was fabulous, this phrase might come in handy.

Belt up - For some reason I heard this quite a lot as a kid. It's the British for shut up.

Bender - I used to go out on a bender quite frequently when I was at university. Luckily bender doesn't only mean a gay man, it also means a pub crawl or a heavy drinking session.

Bespoke - We say something is bespoke if it has been created especially for someone, in the same way that you say custom. For example a computer program might be bespoken for a client, or you may order a bespoke holiday, where the travel agent creates an itinerary around your exact requirements.

Best of British - If someone says "The best of British to you" when you are visiting the UK, it simply means good luck. It is short for "best of British luck".

Biggie - This is unusual. A biggie is what a child calls his poo! Hence the reason Wendy's Hamburgers has never really taken off in England - who would buy "biggie fries"? Yuck - I'm sure you wouldn't buy poo fries! The other meaning of Biggie is erection. It just gets worse!

Bite your arm off - This is not aggressive behaviour that a football fan might engage in. In fact it just means that someone is over excited to get something. For instance you might say that kids would bite your arm off for an ice cream on a sunny day.

Bladdered - This rather ugly expression is another way of saying you are drunk. The link is fairly apparent I feel!

Blast - An exclamation of surprise. You may also hear someone shout "blast it", or even "bugger and blast"!

Blatant - We use this word a lot to mean something is really obvious.

Bleeding - An alternative to the word bloody. You'll hear people say "bleeding hell" or "not bleeding likely" for example.

Blimey - Another exclamation of surprise. My Dad used to say "Gawd Blimey" or "Gor Blimey" or even "Cor Blimey". It is all a corruption of the oath God Blind Me.

Blinding - If something is a blinding success - it does not mean that any eyes were poked out with sharp sticks - it means it was awesome.

Blinkered - Someone who is blinkered is narrow minded or narrow sighted - they only see one view on a subject. It comes from when horses that pulled carriages wore blinkers to stop them seeing to the side or behind them which stopped them from being startled and only let them see where they were going.

Bloody - One of the most useful swear words in English. Mostly used as an exclamation of surprise i.e. "bloody hell" or "bloody nora". Something may be "bloody marvellous" or "bloody awful". It is also used to emphasise almost anything, "you're bloody mad", "not bloody likely" and can also be used in the middle of other words to emphasise them. E.g. "Abso-bloody-lutely"! Americans should avoid saying "bloody" as they sound silly.

Blooming - Another alternative to the word bloody. You might hear someone say "not blooming likely" so that they don't have to swear.

Blow me - When an English colleague of mine exclaimed "Blow Me" in front of a large American audience, he brought the house down. It is simply an exclamation of surprise, short for "Blow me down", meaning something like I am so surprised you could knock me over just by blowing. Similar to "Well knock me down with a feather". It is not a request for services to be performed.

Blow off - Who blew off? Means who farted? Constant source of amusement to us Brits when you guys talk about blowing people off. Conjours up all sort of bizarre images!

Blunt - If a saw or a knife is not sharp we say it is blunt. It is also the way most of us speak! In America the knife would be dull.

Bob's your uncle - This is a well used phrase. It is added to the end of sentences a bit like and that's it! For example if you are telling someone how to make that fabulous banoffee pie you just served them, you would tell them to boil the condensed milk for three hours, spread it onto a basic cheesecake base, slice bananas on top, add some whipped double cream, another layer of banana and Bob's your uncle!

Bodge - We bodge things all the time here. I'm sure you do too! To do a bodge job means to do a quick and dirty. Make it look good for the next day or two and if it falls down after that - hey well we only bodged it! Applies to building, DIY, programming and most other things.

Bogey - Booger. Any variety, crusty dragons included!

Bollocks - This is a great English word with many excellent uses. Technically speaking it means testicles but is typically used to describe something that is no good (that's bollocks) or that someone is talking rubbish (he's talking bollocks). Surprisingly it is also used in a positive manner to describe something that is the best, in which case you would describe it as being "the dog's bollocks". Englishmen who live in America take great delight in ordering specialised registration plates for their cars using the letters B.O.L.L.O.X. Good eh?

Bomb - If something costs a bomb it means that it is really expensive. We say it when we see the price of insurance in the US, you could try saying it when you see how much jeans or petrol cost over here!

Bomb - If something goes like a bomb it means it is going really well or really fast. Or you could say an event went down like a bomb and it would mean that the people really enjoyed it. In the US the meaning would be almost exactly the reverse.

Bonk - Same meaning as shag. Means to have sex. E.g. "Did you bonk him/her?".

Botch - There are two expressions here - to botch something up or to do a botch job. They both mean that the work done was not of a high standard or was a clumsy patch. My Dad used to always tell me that workmen had botched it up and that he should have done the work properly himself.

Bottle - Something you have after twenty pints of lager and a curry. A lotta bottle! This means courage. If you have a lotta bottle you have no fear.

Box your ears - Many young chaps heard their dads threaten to box their ears when I was a littlun. Generally meant a slap around the head for misbehaving. Probably illegal these days!!

Brassed off - If you are brassed off with something or someone, you are fed up. Pissed perhaps.

Brill - Short for "brilliant". Used by kids to mean cool.

Budge up - If you want to sit down and someone is taking up too much space, you'd ask them to budge up - move and make some space.

Bugger - This is another fairly unique word with no real American equivalent. Like bloody it has many uses apart from the obvious dictionary one pertaining to rather unusual sexual habits. My father was always shouting "bugger" when he was working in the garage or garden. Usually when he hit his thumb or dropped a nail or lost something. Today we might use the sh** or the f*** words but bugger is still as common. The fuller version of this would be "bugger it". It can also be used to tell someone to get lost (bugger off), or to admit defeat (we're buggered) or if you were tired or exhausted you would be buggered. You can also call someone a bugger. When I won 10 on the lottery my mate called me a "lucky bugger".

Bugger all - If something costs bugger all, it means that it costs nothing. Meaning it is cheap. If you have bugger all, it means you have nothing.

Bum - This is the part of your body you sit on. Your ass! It might also be someone who is down and out, like a tramp. You might also bum around, if you are doing nothing in particular, just hanging out. Finally to bum something means to scrounge it from someone.

Bung - To bung something means to throw it. For example a street trader might bung something in for free if you pay cash right now! Or you could say "bung my car keys over, mate".

Bung - A bung is also a bribe.

Butchers - To have a butchers at something is to have a look. This is a cockney rhyming slang word that has become common. The reason "butchers" means a look even though it doesn't rhyme is because it is short for "butchers hook" and "hook" of course, does rhyme.

C of E - The Church of England. Our official protestant church - of which the Queen is the head.

Chat up - To chat someone up is to try and pick them up. If you spotted a scrummy girly in a bar you might try to chat her up. Or a girl might try and chat up a chap!

Cheeky - "Eee you cheeky monkey" was what my mother said to me all the time when I was a kid. Cheeky means you are flippant, have too much lip or are a bit of a smart arse! Generally you are considered to be a bit cheeky if you have an answer for everything and always have the last word. My licence plate on my MX5 (Miata in American) was CHEEKY, which most Texans thought was something to do with bottoms - wrong!!

Cheerio - Not a breakfast cereal. Just a friendly way of saying goodbye. Or in the north "tara" which is pronounced sort of like "churar".

Cheers - This word is obviously used when drinking with friends. However, it also has other colloquial meanings. For example when saying goodbye you could say "cheers", or "cheers then". It also means thank you. Americans could use it in English pubs, but should avoid the other situations as it sounds wrong with an American accent. Sorry!

Cheesed off - This is a polite way of saying you are pissed off with something.

Chin Wag - This is another word for a Chat. You can probably tell why!

Chinese Whispers - This a good one. It refers to the way a story gets changed as is passes from one person to the next so that the end result may be completely different from what was originally said. Sound familiar?

Chivvy along - When I'm standing patiently in the checkout queue at Tesco I like to chivvy along the old ladies in front of me. If only they would stop fannying around and hurry up!

Chuffed - You would be chuffed to bits if you were really pleased about something.

Clear off! - This expression brings back memories of being a kid and stealing apples from people's gardens. Sometimes we would get caught and some old bloke would come out and shout "oi clear off you lot". It basically means get lost.

Cobblers - I have heard people say "what a load of cobblers" more than once. Maybe that's because I talk so much rubbish. An equivalent would be what a load of bollocks. It means you are talking out of your butt and has nothing to do with any kind of dessert! Derived from the cockney rhyming slang where Cobblers Awls = Balls!

Cock up - A cock up means you have made a mistake. It has nothing to do with parts of the male body.

Cockney rhyming slang - There are lots of words that make up cockney rhyming slang. These are basically rhyming words like "butchers hook" which means "look". If you are in London and you hear someone talk about a Septic they are probably talking about you - because it's short for "Septic tank" which equals "yank", which is our word for an American. How do you like that!

Codswallop - Another one I heard a lot as a kid - usually when I was making up excuses for how the window got broken or why my dinner was found behind the sofa. My Dad would tell me I was talking a load of codswallop. American kids might be talking baloney under the same circumstances.

Cor - You'll often hear a Brit say "cor"! It is another one of those expressions of surprise that we seem to have so many of. It will sometimes be lengthened to "cor blimey" or "cor love a duck", depending on where you are. "Cor blimey" is a variation of "Gawd Blimey" or "Gor Blimey". They are all a corruption of the oath "God Blind Me".

Cracking - If something is cracking, it means it is the best. Usually said without pronouncing the last "G". If a girl is cracking it means she is stunning.

Cram - Before a big exam you would be expected to cram. This simply means to study hard in the period running up to the exam.

Crap - The same word in both countries - but less rude here. I loved watching Brits being interviewed on US chat shows and embarrassing the interviewer when they said something was "total crap".

Crikey - Another exclamation of surprise. Some people say "Crikey Moses".

Crusty dragon - A booger. One of the really crispy ones.

Daft - My Dad used to call me a daft 'apeth which is short for a daft half penny (in old money). It basically means stupid.

Dekko - To have a look at something.

Dear - If something is dear it means it is expensive. I thought Texan insurance was dear.

Dicky - Dicky rhymes with sicky and means you feel sick.

Diddle - To rip someone off or to con someone is to diddle them. When you visit England, check your change to make sure you haven't been diddled!

Dim - A dim person is stupid or thick or a dimwit. Dimwit - Someone a bit on the dim side.

Dishy - If someone is a bit of a dish or a bit dishy it means they are attractive or good looking.

DIY - This is short for do it yourself and applies not just to the DIY stores but also to anything that you need to do yourself. For example, if we get really bad service in a restaurant (oh, you noticed!) then we might ask the waiter if it is a DIY restaurant - just to wind them up.

Do - A party. You would go to a do if you were going to a party in the UK.

Do - If you go into a shop and say "do you do batteries?" it means "do you sell batteries".

Do - If you drive along a motorway in the wrong lane the police will do you. You could then tell your friends that you have been done by the police. Prosecute is another word for it!

Doddle - Something that is a doddle is a cinch, it's easy. Unlike ordering water in Texas with an English accent, which is definitely not a doddle!

Dodgy - If someone or something is a bit dodgy, it is not to be trusted. Dodgy food should be thrown away at home, or sent back in a restaurant. Dodgy people are best avoided. You never know what they are up to. Dodgy goods may have been nicked. When visiting Miami I was advised by some English chums that certain areas were a bit dodgy and should be avoided!

Dog's bollocks - You would say that something really fantastic was the dog's bollocks. Comes from the fact that a dog's bollocks are so fantastic that he can't stop licking them! Nice huh? Often shortened to just "The dog's".

Dog's dinner - If you make a real mess of something it might be described as a real dog's dinner. A bit like some joint Anglo-American approaches to Eastern Europe for example!

Donkey's years - Someone said to me the other day that they hadn't seen me for donkey's years. It means they hadn't seen me for ages.

Drop a clanger - When I asked a large lady on the tube if she would like my seat since she was so obviously pregnant, she took the seat then told me she was fat, not pregnant! Boy did I drop a clanger. You might make a gaffe. Either way it was horrendously embarrassing, especially as half the people on the tube had heard me!

Duck - In and around Leeds you will find older people might call you "duck" in the same way that they might call you "love" or "dear" in other places. Usually pronounced more like "dook", which rhymes with "book".

Duff - Anything that is duff is useless, junk, trash. It usually means that the object doesn't do the job it was intended for. Our last Prime Minister was pretty duff!

Duffer - Any person that is duff could be referred to as a duffer. The Prime Minister was a duffer.

Dull - You would say something that was no longer sharp was dull. We would say blunt. To us something is dull if it is boring. It can apply to things - like a film could be dull. It also applies to people - I can think of several people who are dull!

Easy Peasy - A childish term for something very easy. You might say it's a snap.

Engaged - When you ring someone and they are already on the phone you will get the engaged tone. In other words, they will be engaged. You would say you get the busy signal or the line is busy.

Excuse me - This is a great one! It's what kids are taught to say when they belch in public. We are also taught to say "pardon me" if we fart out loud. Unfortunately in American "excuse me" means you are encroaching in someone's personal space and you say "pardon me" when you don't hear someone properly. Imagine our surprise when we discovered that actually Americans are not belching and farting all the time.

Faff - To faff is to dither or to fanny around. If we procrastinated when getting ready for bed, as kids, our Dad use tell us we were faffing around.

Fagged - If you are too lazy or tired to do something you could say "I can't be fagged". It means you can't be Bothered.

Fagging - Fagging is the practice of making new boys at boarding schools into slaves for the older boys. If you are fagging for an older boy you might find yourself running his bath, cleaning his shoes or performing more undesirable tasks.

Fancy - If you fancy something then it means you desire it. There are two basic forms in common use - food and people. If you fancy a cake for example it means you like the look of it and you want to eat it. If you see someone of (hopefully) the opposite sex then you might fancy them if you liked the look of them and wanted to get to know them a little better!!!

Fanny - This is the word for a woman's front bits! One doesn't normally talk about anyone's fanny as it is a bit rude. You certainly don't have a fanny pack, or smack people on their fannys - you would get arrested for that! Careful use of this word in the UK is advised!

Fanny around - I'm always telling people to stop fannying around and get on with it. It means to procrastinate. Drives me mad!

Fiddle sticks - I have an old Aunt who is much too well mannered to swear. So when the need arises for a swear word, she will substitute "fiddle sticks".

Filch - To filch is to steal or pilfer. The origin is apparently unknown.

Fit - Fit is a word that I have heard a lot recently - it seems to be making a comeback. A fit bird means a girl who is pretty good looking or tasty! A fit bloke would be the male equivalent.

Flog - To Flog something is to sell it. It also means to beat something with a whip, but when your wife tells you she flogged the old TV it is more likely she has sold it than beaten it (hopefully!).

Fluke - If something great happened to you by chance that would be a fluke. When I was a kid my Mum lost her engagement ring on the beach and only realised half way home. We went back to the spot and she found it in the sand. That was a fluke.

Flutter - I like to have a flutter on the horses. It means to have a bet, usually a small one by someone who is not a serious gambler.

Fortnight - Two weeks. Comes from an abbreviation of "fourteen nights". Hence terms like "I'm off for a fortnights holiday" meaning "I am going on a two week vacation".

Fruity - If someone is feeling fruity then they are feeling frisky. Watch out!

Full monty - Since the movie has come out of the same name I have heard some odd Texan descriptions of what the full monty means. It really has nothing to do with taking your clothes off. It just means the whole thing or going the whole way. That's it. Clearly when applied to stripping it means not stopping at your underwear! The origins of the expression are still under discussion. There are many theories but no conclusive evidence at the moment.

Full of beans - This means to have loads of energy. It is a polite way of saying that a child is a maniac. I was often described as being full of beans as a kid and now it is my wife's way of telling me to keep still when she is trying to get to sleep. Strangely the same expression in some parts of the US means that you are exaggerating or talking bollocks!

Gagging - Desperate, in a fat slaggy kind of a way. Not nice.

Gallivanting - The dictionary says "to gad about", which probably doesn't help much! It means fooling around or horseplay.

Gander - When I was a kid, my Dad often used to go off for a gander when we were visiting a new town or village. It means to look around.

Gen - Gen means information. If you have the gen then you know what is going on.

Gen up - To research a subject or to get some information.

Get lost! - Politely translated as go away, this is really a mild way of telling someone to f*** off!

Get stuffed! - Even politer way to tell someone to get lost is to tell them to get stuffed. However, this is still not a nice thing to say to someone.

Getting off - This seems to be the objective of most teenagers on a big night out. Getting off with someone means making out or snoggingh them.

Give us a bell - This simply means call me. You often hear people use the word "us" to mean "me".

Gobsmacked - Amazed. Your gob is your mouth and if you smack your gob, it would be out of amazement.

Good value - This is short for good value for money. It means something is a good deal.

Goolies - If you have been kicked in the goolies, your eyes would be watering and you would be clutching your balls!

Gormless - A gormless person is someone who has absolutely no clue. You would say clueless. It is also shortened so you could say someone is a total gorm or completely gormy.

Grem - The form of gob meaning to spit something out. e.g. Did you see him grem? Yuck. Usually associated with that ghastly noise as the content of the lungs are coughed into the mouth before gremming can take place. Grem is also the word that describes the green lump that is created in the process. You might call it hacking up a hacker.

Grub - Food. Similar to nosh. I remember my Dad calling "grub's up", when dinner was ready as a kid. A grub is also an insect larva. Not usually eaten in England. Actually is available in some Australian restaurants!


Gutted - If someone is really upset by something they might say that they were gutted. Like when you are told that you have just failed your driving test!

Haggle - To haggle is to argue or negotiate over a price. Most people that wangle stuff are usually quite good at haggling. I just learnt that in the USA you dicker over a price, particularly for used cars!

Hanky panky - Hanky panky - or "slap and tickle" as some older folks call it - would be making out in America.

Hard - After your 20 pints of lager, the curry or the doner, your average 20 year old feels hard. Since his male organ has no chance of working at this stage, hard clearly refers to something else - it means he is ready to fight anything or anybody or to take on any bet. This is the time to make fun of drunken lads by betting them they can't jump off the end of the pier, hang on to the back of a bus etc.

Hard lines - This is another way of saying hard luck or bad luck.

Hash - The thing you call a pound sign! Before you ask, yes it is also something you smoke - see wacky backy. Also to make a real hash of something means you really screwed it up.

Have - This one used to wind me up a treat in Texas. When we were in restaurants with friends, they would say to the waiter something like "Can I get a refill". And the waiter would go and get them a refill. No no no - that's completely wrong. It's "Can I HAVE a refill". Not GET! If you say "Can I GET a refill" in the UK, the waiter will give you a funny look and tell you where to go and GET it - yourself!

Healthy - Healthful. I'm not really sure if this is slang or whether the American use of healthful is the real alternative to the English "healthy". We talk about a healthy lifestyle and about healthy food. I never heard anyone say smoking was "unhealthful" in the US but I suppose that must exist too!

Her Majesty's pleasure - When visiting England, try to avoid being detained at Her Majesty's pleasure. This means being put in prison with no release date!

Hiya - Short for hi there, this is a friendly way of saying hello.

Honking - Honking is being sick or throwing up. Presumably this is a problem in New York where there are signs on the streets that say "No Honking".

Horses for courses - This is a common saying that means each to his own. What suits one person might be horrible for someone else. If my Dad was trying to understand why my brother had wanted to get his ear pierced he might say "Oh well, it's horses for courses I suppose"!

How's your father? - This is a very old term for sex which plays on our apparent British sensitivity. Rather than saying the actual "sex" word you could refer to having a bit of How's your Father, instead - nudge, nudge, wink, wink. The sort of old fashioned saying dragged up by Austin Powers.

Hump - If you have got the hump it means you are in a mood. If you are having a hump, it means you are having sex. Care is advised when you try using these words for the first time. It could be embarrassing!

Hunky-dory - My English dictionary tells me that hunky-dory means excellent. We would generally use it to mean that everything is cool and groovy, on plan, no worries and generally going well.

I'm easy - This expression means I don't care or it's all the same to me. Not to be confused with how easy it is to lure the person into bed!

Irony/sarcasm - The cornerstones of British humour. This is one of the biggest differences between the nations. The sense of humour simply doesn't translate too well.

Jammy - If you are really lucky or flukey, you are also very jammy. It would be quite acceptable to call your friend a jammy b****rd if they won the lottery.

Jimmy - Actually short for Jimmy Riddle. i.e. I'm off for a Jimmy Riddle. This is Cockney rhyming slang for piddle!

John Thomas - Yet another word for a blokes willy! I always felt a bit sorry for people who were actually called John Thomas. What were their parents thinking?

Jolly - You hear people use this in all sorts of ways, but basically it means very. So "jolly good" would mean very good. A common exception is where you hear people say "I should jolly well think so!" which is more to emphasise the point.

Keep your pecker up - This is one way of saying keep your chin up. Use with caution as in some places your pecker is also your willy!

Khazi - Another word for the toilet. Our version of your bathroom.

Kip - A short sleep, forty winks, or a snooze. You have a kip in front of the telly on a Sunday afternoon.

Knackered - The morning after twenty pints and the curry, you'd probably feel knackered. Another way to describe it is to say you feel shagged. Basically worn out, good for nothing, tired out, knackered.

Knees up - If you're having a knees up, you're going to a dance or party.

Knob - Yet another word for your willy.

Knock off - To knock something off is to steal it, not to copy it!

Knock up - This means to wake someone up. Although it seems to have an altogether different meaning in the USA! At one time, in England, a chap was employed to go round the streets to wake the workers up in time to get to work. He knew where everyone lived and tapped on the bedroom windows with a long stick, and was known as a "knocker up". He also turned off the gas street lights on his rounds. Another meaning of this phrase, that is more common these days, is to make something out of odds and ends. For example my Dad knocked up a tree house for us from some planks of wood he had in the garage, or you might knock up a meal from whatever you have hanging around in the fridge.

Knockers - Another word for breasts.

Knuckle sandwich - If somebody offers you a knuckle sandwich you'd be best to decline the offer and leave at the next convenient moment. It isn't some British culinary delight - they're about to thump you in the face.

Leg it - This is a way of saying run or run for it. Usually said by kids having just been caught doing something naughty. Well it was when I was a kid!

Left, right and centre - If you have been looking left, right and centre, it means you have been searching all over.

Love bite - You call them hickies - the things you do to yourself as a youngster with the vacuum cleaner attachment to make it look like someone fancies you!

Lurgy - If you have the lurgy it means you are ill, you have the Flu. Don't go near people with the lurgy in case you get it!

Luvvly-jubbly - Clearly another way of saying lovely. Made famous by the TV show Only Fools and Horses.

-ly - These are two letters that seem to be left off words in America. I never heard anyone say something was "really nice" or "really cool", they would say real nice and real cool. We would be sent to the back of the class for grammar like that!

.........end of part 1

Poppytree
September 5th, 2013, 05:59 AM
............... part 2

Mate - Most chaps like to go to the pub with their mates. Mate means friend or chum.

Momentarily - As you come into land at an American airport and the announcement says that you will be landing momentarily, look around to see if anyone is sniggering. That will be the Brits! I never did figure out why they say this. Momentarily to us means that something will only happen for an instant - a very short space of time. So if the plane lands momentarily will there be enough time for anyone to get off? Weird!

Morish - Also spelt "moreish", this word is used to describe desserts in my house, when a single helping is simply not enough. You need more! It applies to anything - not just desserts.

Mufti - An old army term for your "civvies". Civilian clothes that is, rather than your uniform.

Mug - If someone is a bit of a mug, it means they are gullible. Most used car salesmen rely on a mug to show up so they can sell something!

Mush - Rhymes with "push". Slang word for your mouth as in "shut your mush". Also means mate as in "Alright mush?. Which means "Hi"!

Mutt's nuts - If something is described as being "the Mutt's" then you'll know it is fantastic or excellent. "The Mutt's" is short for "The Mutt's nuts" which is clearly another way of saying the "Dog's Bollocks"! All clear now?

Naff - If something is naff, it is basically uncool. Anoraks are naff, salad cream is also naff. You could also use it to tell someone to naff off, which is a politer way of telling them to f*** off!

Nancy boy - If someone is being pathetic you would call them a nancy or a nancy boy. It is the opposite of being hard. For example in cold weather a nancy boy would dress up in a coat, hat, gloves and scarf and a hard guy would wear a t-shirt. It's also another word for a gay man.

Nark - If someone is in a nark, it means they are in a bad mood, or being grumpy. It's also the word for a spy or informant. For example a coppers nark is someone who is a police informant - which you might call a stoolie or stool-pigeon. The origin is from the Romany word, nak, meaning "nose".

Narked - In the UK you would say that someone looked narked if you thought they were in a bad mood. In the US you might say that someone was pissed. We definitely would not say that, as it would mean they were drunk!

Nesh - My Dad used to call me a nesh wimp when I was a kid and I wanted him to take me places in his car because it was too cold to go on my bike. He meant I was being pathetic or a bit of a nancy boy. He might have had a point!

Nice one! - If someone does something particularly impressive you might say "nice one"! to them. It is close the Texan good job that you hear all the time.

Nick - To nick is to steal. If you nick something you might well get nicked.

Nicked - Something that has been stolen has been nicked. Also, when a copper catches a burglar red handed he might say "you've been nicked"!

Nitwit - See twit.

Nookie - Nookie is the same as hanky panky. Something you do with your bird!

Nosh - Food. You would refer to food as nosh or you might be going out for a good nosh up, or meal! Either way if someone has just cooked you some nosh you might want to call it something else as it is not the nicest word to describe it.

Not my cup of tea - This is a common saying that means something is not to your liking. For example if someone asked you if you would like to go to an all night rave, they would know exactly what you meant if you told them it was not exactly your cup of tea!

Nowt - This is Yorkshire for nothing. Similarly owt is Yorkshire for anything. Hence the expression "you don't get owt for nowt". Roughly translated as "you never get anything for nothing" or "there's no such thing as a free lunch".

Nut - To nut someone is to head butt them. Nutting is particularly useful when at a football match.

Off colour - If someone said you were off colour they would mean that you look pale and ill! Not quite the same as something being off colour in the US!

Off your trolley - If someone tells you that you're off your trolley, it means you have gone raving bonkers, crazy, mad!

On about - What are you on about? That's something you may well hear when visiting the UK. It means what are you talking about?

On the job - If you are on the job, it could mean that you are hard at work, or having sex. Usually the context helps you decide which it is!

On the piss - If you are out on the piss, it means you are out to get drunk, or to get pissed.

On your bike - A very polite way of telling someone to f*** off.

One off - A one off is a special or a one time event that is never to be repeated. Like writing this book!

Owt - This is Yorkshire for anything. Similarly nowt is Yorkshire for nothing. Hence the expression "you don't get owt for nowt". Roughly translated as "you never get anything for nothing" or "there's no such thing as a free lunch".

Pants - This is quite a new expression - I have no idea where it came from. Anyway, it is now quite trendy to say that something which is total crap is "pants". For instance you could say the last episode of a TV show was "total pants".

Pardon me - This is very amusing for Brits in America. Most kids are taught to say "pardon me" if they fart in public or at the table etc. In America it has other meanings which take us Brits a while to figure out. I thought I was surrounded by people with flatulence problems!


Parky - Either short for Michael Parkinson, a famous chat show host, or more likely a word to describe the weather as being rather cold!

Pass - This means I don't know and comes from the old TV show, Mastermind, where contestants were made to say "pass" if they did not know the answer to the question.

Pavement pizza - Well here the pavement is the sidewalk and a pavement pizza is a descriptive way of saying vomit. Often found outside Indian restaurants early on a Sunday morning.

Peanuts - I hated one of my summer jobs as a kid because it paid peanuts. The full expression is that if you pay peanuts, you get monkeys. It is a fairly derogatory way of saying that manual labour doesn't need to be bright and doesn't need a lot of pay. Typically these days peanuts means something is cheap. For example we would say the petrol in the USA is peanuts or costs peanuts. Compared to our prices it is.

Pear shaped - If something has gone pear shaped it means it has become a disaster. It might be preparing a dinner party or arranging a meeting, any of these things can go completely pear shaped.

Piece of cake - I remember saying it's a piece of cake in front of one of my American friends, who then started looking around for the cake! It means it's a cinch!

Pinch - This means to steal something. Though when you say "steal" it is a bit more serious than pinch. A kid might pinch a cake from the kitchen. A thief would steal something during a burglary.

Pip pip - Another out-dated expression meaning goodbye. Not used any more.

Piss poor - If something is described as being "piss poor" it means it is an extremely poor attempt at something.

Piss up - A piss up is a drinking session. A visit to the pub. There is an English expression to describe someone as disorganised which says that he/she could not organise a piss up in a brewery!

Pissed - This is a great one for misunderstanding. Most people go to the pub to get pissed. In fact the object of a stag night is to get as pissed as possible. Getting pissed means getting drunk. It does not mean getting angry. That would be getting pissed off!

Pissing around - Fooling about, in the sense of messing around or making fun or just being silly. Not terribly polite.

Plastered - Another word for loaded. In other words you have had rather too much to drink down your local. It has nothing to do with being covered with plaster though anything is possible when you are plastered.

Porkies - More cockney rhyming slang. Short for "porky pies", meaning "pork pies". Rhymes with lies. My Mum always used to tell me I was telling porkies! And she was right!

Porridge - Doing porridge means to serve time in prison. There was also a comedy TV series called Porridge about a prisoner starring Ronnie Barker of The Two Ronnies fame.

Posh - Roughly translates as high class, though if you look at Posh Spice there are clearly exceptions to the rule! Comes from the cabins used by the upper class on early voyages from England to India. The coolest (and most expensive cabins) were Port side on the way Out and Starboard on the way Home.

Potty - This isn't just the thing you sit a toddler on - if you are potty it means you are a little crazy, a bit of a looney, one card short of a full deck.

Pound sign - Ever wondered why Brits flounder when voicemail messages say to press the pound sign? What on earth is the British currency doing on a phone anyway? Well, it isn't. To a Brit, the pound sign is the wiggly thing we use to denote the UK pound (or quid), in the same way you have a dollar sign.

Prat - Yet another mildly insulting name for someone. In fact, this one is a bit ruder than pillock so you probably wouldn't say it in front of Grandma.

PTO - This is an abbreviation for "please turn over". You will see it on forms in the UK where you would see the single word over in the USA.

Puff - If a Brit starts giggling in your local drugstore - it may be because they have just found a box of Puffs. To some of us Brits a Puff is another word for a fart. Stems from the cockney rhyming slang, to "Puff a dart".

Pukka - This term has been revived recently by one of our popular young TV chefs. It means super or smashing, which of course is how he describes all his food.

Pull - Me and the lads used to go to the disco when we were on the pull. It means looking for birds. Of course, it works the other way round too. The ladies may also be on the pull, though probably a bit more subtly than the chaps!

Pussy - This is what we call our cat, as in "pussy cat", or in the fairytale, Puss in Boots. So if you have a Brit neighbour who asks if you have seen their pussy - try to keep a straight face and think back the last time you saw their cat!

Put a sock in it - This is one way of telling someone to shut up. Clearly the sock needs to be put in their loud mouth!

Put paid to - This is an expression which means to put an end to something. For example you could say that rain put paid to the cricket match, meaning it stopped play.

Queer - Apart from the obvious gay link, this word used to be used a lot to mean someone looked ill. As in "You look queer". Of course you might not say that these days in case you get either picked up, or thumped!

Quid - A pound in money is called a quid. It is the equivalent to the buck or clam in America. A five pound note is called a fiver and a ten pound note is called a tenner.

Quite - When used alone, this word means the same as absolutely!

Rat arsed - Yet another term for drunk, sloshed or plastered. You might say loaded. In the UK, loaded is a men's magazine that covers sex and football.

Read - If someone asks you what you read at university, they mean what was your major at school.

Really - This is one of those words where you say almost the same thing as us, but just can't be fagged to finish it off. The word is "really", not real. You say things like it's real hot, something's real cool, a baby is real cute. If we said that we would be sent to the back of the class for our grammar - or lack of it!

Redundancy - If you are made redundant it means you are laid off.

Reverse the charges - When you want to ring someone up and you have no money you can call the operator and ask to reverse the charges in the UK. In the US you would call collect.

Right - I'm feeling right knackered. That would mean you were feeling very tired.

Ring - You would ring someone on the phone not call them, in the UK. Try saying "give me a ring" to the next Brit you meet. This does not work well in reverse. I asked someone in a shop to ring me up and he dragged me to the till and pulled my head across the scanner!


Roger - Same kind of problem that Randy has here, except we have people called Roger and no Randys. You will see a strange smile on the face of a Brit every time "Roger the Rabbit" is mentioned!! To roger means to have your wicked way with a lady. My Oxford English Dictionary says to copulate. You might say screw.

Round - When you hear the words "your round" in the pub, it means it is your turn to buy the drinks for everyone in the group - nothing to do with the size of your tummy! Since beers are more and more expensive these days, the art of buying the rounds has developed into ensuring you buy the first one before everyone has arrived, without being obvious!

Row - Rhymes with "cow" this means an argument. You might hear your Mum having a row with your Dad, or your neighbours might be rowing so loud you can hear them!

Rubbish - The stuff we put in the bin. Trash or garbage to you. You might also accuse someone of talking rubbish.

Rugger - This is short for "rugby". It is a contact sport similar to your football but played in muddy fields during winter and rain. Not only that, but the players wear almost no protection!

Rumpy pumpy - Another word for hanky panky, or a bit of nookie! Something two consenting adults get up to in private! Theoretically!

Sack/sacked - If someone gets the sack it means they are fired. Then they have been sacked. I can think of a few people I'd like to sack!

Sad - This is a common word, with the same meaning as naff. Used in expressions like "you sad b***ard".

Scrummy - This is a word that would be used to describe either some food that was particularly good (and probably sweet and fattening).

Scrumping - To go stealing - usually apples from someone elses trees!

Send-up - To send someone up is to make fun of them. Or if something is described as being a send-up it is equivalent to your take-off. Like Robin Williams does a take-off on the British accent - quite well actually!

Shag - Same as bonk but slightly less polite. At seventies parties watch the look of surprise on the Englishman's face when an American girl asks him if he would like to shag. Best way to get a Brit to dance that I know! You can even go to shagging classes!

Shagged - Past tense of shag, but also see knackered.

Shambles - If something is a shambles it is chaotic or a real mess. It's also a very old name for a slaughterhouse. So if you ever visit The Shambles in York, then the name does not refer to the somewhat shambolic nature of the buildings; it's a reference to the site it's built on - an old slaughterhouse!

Shambolic - In a state of chaos. Generally heard on the news when the government is being discussed!

Shirty - "Don't get shirty with me young man" was what my Dad used to tell me when I was little. He was referring to my response to his telling off for doing some terrible little boy thing. Like tying my brother to the back of Mum's car or putting my shoes in the toilet. It meant I was getting bad tempered.

****e - This is just another way of saying ****. It is useful for times when you don't want to be overly rude as it doesn't sound quite as bad!

****faced - If you hear someone saying that they got totally ****faced it means they were out on the town and got steaming drunk. Normally attributed to stag nights or other silly events.

Shufti - Pronounced shooftee, this means to take a look at something, to take a butchers! It's an old Arabic word, picked up by British soldiers during World War II, in North Africa.

Sixes and sevens - If something is all at sixes and sevens then it is in a mess, topsy turvy or somewhat haywire!

Skew-whiff - This is what you would call crooked. Like when you put a shelf up and it isn't straight we would say it is all skew-whiff.

Skive - To skive is to evade something. When I was a kid we used to skive off school on Wednesdays instead of doing sports. We always got caught of course, presumably because the teachers used to do the same when they were fourteen!

Slag - To slag someone off, is to bad mouth them in a nasty way. Usually to their face.

Slapper - A slapper is a female who is a bit loose. A bit like a slag or a tart. Probably also translates into tramp in American.

Slash - Something a lager lout might be seen doing in the street after his curry - having a slash. Other expressions used to describe this bodily function include; siphon the python, shake the snake, wee, pee, piss, piddle and having a jimmy.

Sloshed - Yet another way to describe being drunk. Clearly we need a lot of ways to describe it since getting plastered is a national pastime.

Smarmy - Another word for a smoothy, someone who has a way with the ladies for example. Usually coupled with "git" - as in "what a smarmy git". Not meant to be a nice expression, of course.

Smart - When we say someone is smart, we are talking about the way they are dressed - you might say they look sharp. When you say someone is smart you are talking about how intelligent or clever they are.

Smashing - If something is smashing, it means it is terrific.

Smeg - This is a rather disgusting word, popularised by the TV show, Red Dwarf. Short for smegma, the dictionary definition says it is a "sebaceous secretion from under the foreskin". Now you know why it has taken me 3 years to add it in here. Not nice! Rather worryingly smeg is also the name of a company that makes ovens!!!

Snap - This is the name of a card game where the players turn cards at the same time and shout "snap" when they match. People also say "snap" when something someone else says has happened to them too. For example when I told somebody that my wallet was stolen on holiday, they said "snap", meaning that theirs had too!

Snog - If you are out on the pull you will know you are succeeding if you end up snogging someone of the opposite sex (or same sex for that matter!). It would probably be referred to as making out in American, or serious kissing!

Snookered - If you are snookered it means you are up the famous creek without a paddle. It comes from the game of snooker where you are unable to hit the ball because the shot is blocked by your opponent's ball.

Sod - This word has many uses. My father always used to say "Oh Sod!" or "Sod it!" if something went wrong and he didn't want to swear too badly in front of the children. If someone is a sod or an "old sod" then it means they are a bit of a bastard or an old git. "Sod off" is like saying "piss off" or "get lost" & "sod you" means something like "f*** off". It also means a chunk of lawn of course. You can usually tell the difference!

Sod all - If you are a waiter in America and you serve a family of Brits, the tip is likely to be sod all or as you would call it - nothing. Because we don't know about tipping.

Sod's law - This is another name for Murphy's law - whatever can go wrong, will go wrong.

Sorted - When you have fixed a problem and someone asks how it is going you might say "sorted". It's also popular these days to say "get it sorted" when you are telling someone to get on with the job.

Speciality - This is another one where you chaps drop your "I". when I first saw specialty written down in the US I thought it was a mistake. But no! We love our I's!

Spend a penny - To spend a penny is to go to the bathroom. It is a very old fashioned expression that still exists today. It comes from the fact that in ladies loos you used to operate the door by inserting an old penny.


Splash out - If you splash out on something - it means you throw your senses out the window, get out your credit card and spend far too much money. You might splash out on a new car or even on a good meal.

Squidgy - A chocolate cream cake would be squidgey. It means to be soft and, well, squidgey!

Squiffy - This means you are feeling a little drunk. Some people also use it to mean that something has gone wrong.

Starkers - Avoid being seen starkers when visiting England. It means stark naked.

Stiffy - Yet another word for erection.

Stone the crows - This is an old expression with the same meaning as "cor blimey".

Stonker - This means something is huge. Looking at the burger you might say "blimey what a stonker". It is also used to refer to an erection! Clearly English modesty is a myth!

Stonking - This weird word means huge. You might say "what a stonking great burger" if you were in an American burger joint.

Strop - If someone is sulking or being particularly miserable you would say they are being stroppy or that they have a strop on. I heard an old man on the train tell his wife to stop being a stroppy cow.

Stuff - A recent headline in the New Statesman read "stuff the millennium". Using stuff in this context is a polite way of saying "f*** the millennium". Who cares! Stuff it! You can also say "stuff him" or "stuff her" meaning they can sod off.

Suss - If you heard someone saying they had you sussed they would mean that they had you figured out! If you were going to suss out something it would mean the same thing.

Sweet fanny adams - This means nothing or sod all. It is a substitute for "sweet f*** all". It is also shortened further to "sweet F A".

Swotting - Swotting means to study hard, the same as cram does. Before exams we used to swot, not that it made any difference to some of us. If you swotted all the time, you would be called a swot - which is not a term of endearment!

Ta - We said "ta" as kids in Liverpool for years before we even knew it was short for thanks.

Table - We use this word in exactly the opposite way. To us a motion is tabled when it is brought to the table, or suggested for consideration. You table a motion when it is left for a later date.

Taking the biscuit - If something really takes the biscuit, it means it out-does everything else and cannot be bettered. Some places in America they said takes the cake.

Taking the mickey - See taking the piss. Variations include "taking the mick" and "taking the Michael".

Taking the piss - One of the things Americans find hardest about the Brits is our sense of humour. It is obviously different and is mainly based on irony, sarcasm and an in-built desire to "take the piss". This has nothing to do with urine, but simply means making fun of someone.

Talent - Talent is the same as totty. Checking out the talent means looking for the sexy young girls (or boys I suppose).

Tara - Pronounced "churar", this is another word for cheerio or goodbye. Cilla Black, a scouse TV presenter has probably done most to promote the use of this word as she says it all the time on her programmes.

Throw a spanner in the works - This is an expression that means to wreck something.

Tickety-boo - If something is going well with no problems we would say it is tickety-boo.

Tidy - Apart from the obvious meaning of neat, tidy also means that a woman is a looker, attractive or sexy.

To - We go to school from ages 5 to 18. You might go to school from ages 5 thru 18. We don't say thru in that context at all. If we did though, we would say "through"!

Todger - As if we don't have enough of them already, this is yet another word for your willy, or penis.

Toodle pip - This is an old expression meaning goodbye. However, I only hear it when Americans are doing impressions of Brits as it has fallen into disuse, along with steam trains and gas lights.

Tool - Yet another word for your willy or penis. You'd think we were obsessed.

Tosser - This is another word for wanker and has exactly the same meaning and shares the same hand signal. Unfortunately my house in Texas was in Tossa Lane, which was a problem when telling older members of the family where to write to me!

Totty - If a chap is out looking for totty, he is looking for a nice girl to chat up. There is an Italian football player called Totti - which is pronounced the same. It's really funny hearing the commentators when he gets the ball saying "it's Totty for Italy". It sounds like some beautiful Italian girlies have invaded the pitch.

TTFN - Short for "ta ta for now". Which in turn means goodbye! Said by older folks and one Radio Two DJ in particular.

Twat - Another word used to insult someone who has upset you. Also means the same as fanny but is less acceptable in front of your grandmother, as this refers to parts of the female anatomy. Another use for the same word is to twat something, which would be to hit it hard. Get it right or I'll twat you over the head!

Twee - Twee is a word you would generally hear older people say. It means dainty or quaint. A bit like the way you chaps think of England I suppose.

Twit - You twit! Not so rude as calling someone an idiot but it amounts to the same thing. Remember Monty Python's "Twit of the Year" competition? Other versions include "nitwit".

Two finger salute - When you see a Brit stick up two fingers at you in a V shape, he may be ordering two of something (if his palms are toward you). The other way around and it's an insult along the lines of your one finger salute. Which, by the way, is very popular here now too!

U - A letter used far more in British. It is in words like colour, favour, labour etc. I think this is why UK keyboards have 102 characters on them instead of your 101, or is it because they have a pound sign on them?

Uni - Short for university, we would say we went to uni like you would say you went to school. School here is just for kids.

Wacky backy - This is the stuff in a joint, otherwise known as pot or marijuana!

Waffle - To waffle means to talk on and on about nothing. It is not something you eat. Americans often think that Brits waffle on about the weather. The truth of course is that our news reports last 60-120 seconds and the weather man is not hyped up to be some kind of superstar as he is on the TV in the US. If you want to see an example of real waffle watch the weather channel in Texas where there is nothing to talk about other than it is hot and will remain so for the next 6 months. Another example is the ladies who waffle on about anything on the Home Shopping Network. They would probably be classed as professional wafflers!

Wangle - Some people have all the luck. I know some people that can wangle anything; upgrades on planes, better rooms in hotels. You know what I mean.

Wank - This is the verb to describe the action a wanker participates in.

Wanker - This is a derogatory term used to describe someone who is a bit of a jerk. It actually means someone who masturbates and also has a hand signal that can be done with one hand at people that cannot see you shouting "wanker" at them. This is particularly useful when driving.

Watcha - Simply means Hi. Also short for "what do you" as in "watcha think of that"?

Waz - On average, it seems that for every pint of lager you need to go for a waz twice! A complete waste of time in a serious drinking session. It means wee or pee.

Well - Well can be used to accentuate other words. for example someone might be "well hard" to mean he is a real man, as opposed to just "hard". Something really good might be "well good". Or if you were really really pleased with something you might be "well chuffed". Grammatically it's appalling but people say it anyway.

Welly - If you "give it welly", it means you are trying harder or giving it the boot. An example would be when accelerating away from lights, you would give it welly to beat the guy in the mustang convertible in the lane next to you. Welly is also short for wellington boots, which are like your galoshes.

Whinge - Whingers are not popular in any circumstance. To whinge is to whine. We all know someone who likes to whinge about everything.

Willy - Another word for penis. It is the word many young boys are taught as it is a nicer word than most of the alternatives. Some people also use it for girls as there are no nice alternatives. Hence "woman's willy". Also used by grown ups who don't wish to offend (this word is safe to use with elderly Grandparents).

Wind up - This has a couple of meanings. If something you do is a "wind up" it means you are making fun of someone. However it you are "wound up" it means you are annoyed.

Wobbler - To "throw a wobbly" or to "throw a wobbler" means to have a tantrum. Normally happens when you tell your kids they can't have an ice cream or that it's time for bed.

Wonky - If something is shaky or unstable you might say it is wonky. For example I changed my chair in a restaurant recently because I had a wonky one.

Write to - When visiting the US one can't help noticing that you write each other. You don't "write to" each other. Here it would be grammatically incorrect to say "write me" and you would be made to write it out 100 times until you got it right.

Yakking - This means talking incessantly - not that I know anyone who does that now!

Yonks - "Blimey, I haven't heard from you for yonks". If you heard someone say that it would mean that they had not seen you for ages!

Zed - The last letter of the alphabet. The English hate saying zee and only relent with names such as ZZ Top (Zed Zed Top does sound a bit stupid!).

Zonked - If someone is zonked or "zonked out" it means they are totally knackered or you might say exhausted. When a baby has drunk so much milk, his eyes roll into the back of his head, it would be fair to say he was zonked!

Poppytree
September 5th, 2013, 08:12 AM
Several other posts from me - food, clothes etc.........

Eliza
September 5th, 2013, 09:44 PM
Loving this thread. :)

A couple of Aussie ones. Thongs are rubber sandals not underwear! A torch is not something on fire, it is a flashlight.

A few years ago we flew into London and, very jetlagged, caught a train from the airport. I was very intrigued to see a sign in the train that said "This train is for Cockfosters". What on earth is a cockfoster, I wondered?

LindaFaye
July 2nd, 2014, 11:31 AM
I love listening to people talk with different accents, particularly English, Irish, and Australian. Sometimes I have to use close-caption when I am watching a movie or show with English accents because I can't always understand what they are saying. There needs to be an English-to-American translator because of all the slang words that come up in English shows and I wonder what they mean by that. My neighbor had some friends visiting from England and they wanted to go to a boot sale, so she took them to a western boot store. What they really wanted was our version of a flea market where things are sold out of the boot (translation: trunk) of the car.

ravelim
July 2nd, 2014, 12:10 PM
This is just regional US. When we were first married,we lived in a small town and my wonderful next door neighbor always wanted to know if I wanted a "soda". I, being from NW Iowa said oh no, thinking this was an ice cream treat. What she meant was like a diet coke which we call "pop".

Angelia
July 2nd, 2014, 12:10 PM
"Grasp the nettle" always makes me smile.

Wrenmuzz
July 2nd, 2014, 04:11 PM
The one that amused me when my daughter and I visited NY was being asked if we wanted the check. I would use a cheque to pay a bill. I come from the NE of England and our accent is called Geordie, unique and wonderful. I remember trying to watch the programme Treme set in New Orleans but gave up after one episode as I couldn't understand it.As Winston Churchill (whose mother was American) said, we are two great countries separated by a common language. But now, naughty me, I'm off to have a fag, don't be shocked I'm going to have a cigarette!

Annette Ackley
July 2nd, 2014, 07:46 PM
Ravelim, I know what you mean about the pop and soda thing. In down state of PA. they call it Soda, up here in Northern Pa they call it pop. My DS, who lived down state would tease me all the time about the soda, pop thing. But when, I moved up here in the North, I too, order a soda, thinking it was a soda, and I got a soda with ice cream. Everyone thinks I talk funny, cause us Penna. Dutch people tend to say things backwards. And the fact that I have an accent. lol, when I moved up North and got a job, they girls I worked with would make me talk a lot, they thought I was from England. To this day I still have a problem with pronouncing certain words. But, I also enjoy listening to other folks who are from somewhere else. Everyone has a certain slang or accent.

MartinaG
July 2nd, 2014, 09:35 PM
It was really sad. The other day I was watching an American show and they had to subtitle what the good folks were saying. That Southern lingo can be quite interesting. lol

Amber
July 2nd, 2014, 10:00 PM
twnkeyes - I just asked my son (aged 13 yrs) what does 'It's fixin to rain.' mean, and he had no idea. I've just explained it too him and he's trying it out in his best Texan accent (you'd not recognise it I'm sure!).

As I've said above BH is definately an adult English expletive.

Are you trying to say, cussing? That's what we call it or some call it cursing. The kids get in trouble if they cuss.

Wrenmuzz
July 3rd, 2014, 12:40 PM
We call it swearing but I have to put my hands up to saying Bloody Hell quite regularly, what makes it funny in the Harry Potter movies when Ron uses it is the fact that you know his parents would have words with him, but it's not 'bad' swearing. In reply to another post here about the use of the word Mummy for Mother, I too think a Mummy is a dead Egyptian. To me it's a posh word, think Downton Abbey, more used in Southern England.

Sandy Navas
July 3rd, 2014, 12:50 PM
It was really sad. The other day I was watching an American show and they had to subtitle what the good folks were saying. That Southern lingo can be quite interesting. lol

My hubby was watching Swamp People and was laughing because it had subtitles . . .

BobW
July 3rd, 2014, 07:42 PM
Well, I chuckle at the English calling the trunk of a car a boot, the engine compartment the bonnot. Tea is a meal.

When I was growing up my grandmother said a couple of things that I always thought were funny.

She always had to put her rubbers on when she was going outside in the rain, she also called rubber bands just rubbers.
The kitchen stove was a range.
The refrigerator was the ice-box.

New York Sue
July 3rd, 2014, 08:02 PM
I LOVE it when the English say 'BLOODY'! It's much better than the American alternative.... ;)

MartinaG
July 3rd, 2014, 09:27 PM
My hubby was watching Swamp People and was laughing because it had subtitles . . .
That's the show, Sandy. lol

Marty
July 5th, 2014, 08:12 AM
When our son was born our neighbors said he was a "handsome chap." It made me smile.

soul60s
March 31st, 2015, 06:38 AM
It's pop here too, and some places call it soda

It's soda here in RI. Coke would be a brand of soda.

fmedwards
April 1st, 2015, 01:55 AM
My mom was raised in central Illinois and my youngest nieces live in Arizona. Language is regionally funny. When the girls were little, Grams said she was going to the "warsh room". They asked where that was. She translated it into "utility room". They asked if they could go. She led them into my laundry room! It was a nice little parade.

rebeccas-sewing
April 1st, 2015, 04:48 AM
Hearing a British friend try to imitate an American accent was pretty hilarious. She sounded just like John Wayne! I got a hugh laugh out of that. "It's a dog's breakfast." (make a mess of it) or "Bob's your uncle." (meaning from that point on you'll be fine). Joe came up with these two. I can't think of any that are funny but I love it when I hear "cheers" instead of thank you. "The bits" for "the pieces" is one I heard recently when we were visiting Joe's co-worker in England.

snippet
April 1st, 2015, 05:34 AM
I love hearing 'bloody hell' and 'bullocks'. I guess they are cuss words.

Fixin' to and y'all are words I use all the time. Coke is the carbonated stuff. I could probably add a dozen more words we use here, but they all seem so normal.

I still don't get the English use of the the word biscuit. If it's a cookie, then what do you call biscuits?

I had a friend from England stay with my family for a while when I was young. He asked me for a flannel and I had no idea what he wanted. Turns out he wanted a wash cloth.

He was very disappointed when he saw we didn't ride horses and tumbleweeds didn't roll down the street in Texas. Still he had a great time. I took him to the ranch and he got to see cattle and horses and chickens. It was a hoot.

My mother in law was Irish. That's another accent I love to listen to. Gosh I wish she were still alive. She had stories of cutting peat and burning it in the fire for their heat.

Darn, I didn't realize this was an old thread!

Divine Daisy
April 1st, 2015, 04:43 PM
Hearing a British friend try to imitate an American accent was pretty hilarious. She sounded just like John Wayne! I got a hugh laugh out of that. "It's a dog's breakfast." (make a mess of it) or "Bob's your uncle." (meaning from that point on you'll be fine). Joe came up with these two. I can't think of any that are funny but I love it when I hear "cheers" instead of thank you. "The bits" for "the pieces" is one I heard recently when we were visiting Joe's co-worker in England.

Coughs at you.......That was meeeeeeeeeee and I do NOT sound like John Wayne (wa ha) that's how you ALL sound to us! Just sayin

Pandabear
April 1st, 2015, 05:49 PM
I was just watch The Great British Sewing Bee and one challenge they had to make a child's fancy dress. I was confused for a bit when the contestants talked about making pirate and dinosaur costumes.

To me a fancy dress is something you wear to a formal type party.

Poppers also had me going. They were talking about putting snaps on overalls.

RhondaRae
April 1st, 2015, 06:50 PM
Loved reading this thread! I'm glad it was brought up again.

My mother in law lived in Missouri hills when she was young and she has sayings that I find so funny.
My husband uses some of them also

Poke on the pounds - meaning to gain weight. I can see someone poking fat into their sides LOL
Raining like the gits - raining really extremely hard
WalmarK instead of Walmart
Dest instead of Desk
Receipt instead of recipe

As for funny English expressions the one that I find funny is Gob Smacked had never heard it until I started watching Dr Who in 2009 and Rose used it alot

easyquilts
April 1st, 2015, 10:26 PM
Heckfire shoot is not a common saying across America. I wonder if it is based on an old saying I'd heard before "shoot fire and save the matches." or in not so polite company sh!t fire ... And I'm not 100% sure of what that really means either.

Anyway, the one that I wonder about is "And Bob's your uncle." I've seen Divine Daisy say it here and I heard it on some British show on TV the other day, no clue what it means.


There 's a woman I gollow on uTube, who lives in Ottowall. She's always saying "and Bob 's your uncle", when something is done quickly.