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View Full Version : COMPLETELY DISGUSTED!



RFREE
June 24th, 2013, 10:32 AM
A couple nights ago I watched a very reputable news reporting program;Dateline? or whatever the show was.; about the Goodwill's in the united states. It was reporting that a lot of the Goodwill's in the US hire disabled people and pay them mere cents on the hour for their labor. Some as low as .22 cents an hour! And it is legal! Are you serious? And that's not all either. To add insult to injury they reported that CEO"S /managers etc. Make upwards of a half a million dollars annually as their income! I am absolutely disgusted to say the least. I have always supported charitable organizations but this just takes the cake. Why wouldn't a special needs person make as much money;or close to it; as a person who doesn't have special needs? Especially if they are hired to do the jobs that a normal person would be doing? Am I wrong to feel this way? I think this is so bad and shame on the big wheels that refused to be interviewed during this broadcast. I wonder if they sleep good at night!! Needless to say I will not be donating another thing to our local Goodwill or any goodwill for all that matters.

laf512
June 24th, 2013, 10:53 AM
I didn't see that news story, but I agree that it is absolutely wrong.

jet4361
June 24th, 2013, 11:06 AM
I am not sure how it works in KY, but I worked with severly mentally disabled folks as a job coach. It was a part time job for me during college while I was earning my special education teaching degree. I did not get to see the mews show that you are referring too. I can speak to what it was based on in Oklahoma many years ago.

The more capable the person was was mpre money they made. The Goodwill Facility is used as a training spot for individuals with disabilities. Some higher functioning folks who could do several tasks would be bumped up to minimum wage after a probation period of working with their job coach. Many only made a few cents on the dollar if they were more severly disabled and only able to push a color coded button on the washing machine. And I am not sure if the news story addressed the fact that the individuals were only allowed to make a small amount of money or their disability checks would be stopped. Many individuals used Goodwill as a safe place to train and learn to interact with the public for the first time and then they would go on to part time employment at another job.

I had NO idea about the big wigs having such a high salary. From my perspective, I saw Goodwill as a good place for the individuals in my area. I hate to see people stop supporting them totally. I would encourage you to ask some questions at your local store before you make your decision. They can't discuss any person in particular but they could tell you if your local store is a training facility. How many individuals were making minimum wage etc.

jet4361
June 24th, 2013, 11:10 AM
Oops, premature send. I meant to add that my experience was 10+ years ago, and that things could very well have changed since my experience with them. Also, if you have any questions that I could answer, I would be happy to. But I do want to encourage folks to ask questions before you stop supporting an organization that I saw help many folks who would not even been given an opportunity at other places.

My two cents,
Jennifer

RFREE
June 24th, 2013, 11:14 AM
I am not sure how it works in KY, but I worked with severly mentally disabled folks as a job coach. It was a part time job for me during college while I was earning my special education teaching degree. I did not get to see the mews show that you are referring too. I can speak to what it was based on in Oklahoma many years ago.

The more capable the person was was mpre money they made. The Goodwill Facility is used as a training spot for individuals with disabilities. Some higher functioning folks who could do several tasks would be bumped up to minimum wage after a probation period of working with their job coach. Many only made a few cents on the dollar if they were more severly disabled and only able to push a color coded button on the washing machine. And I am not sure if the news story addressed the fact that the individuals were only allowed to make a small amount of money or their disability checks would be stopped. Many individuals used Goodwill as a safe place to train and learn to interact with the public for the first time and then they would go on to part time employment at another job.

I had NO idea about the big wigs having such a high salary. From my perspective, I saw Goodwill as a good place for the individuals in my area. I hate to see people stop supporting them totally. I would encourage you to ask some questions at your local store before you make your decision. They can't discuss any person in particular but they could tell you if your local store is a training facility. How many individuals were making minimum wage etc.

Thanks jet4361. Maybe I do need to check into it because I do think; in my heart of hearts; that it is a good thing. I thought about the amount that they payed them and their monthly check as well but the CEO salary is what got me. I too work with severely handicapped young adults and it makes my blood boil to see things like this. They try so hard to fit in.

jet4361
June 24th, 2013, 11:45 AM
Yes they do. And some of the individuals that I took to Goodwill were wheel chair bound and were unable to do any physical tasks. They were trained as greeters and they were paid very little but they used the experience more to gain socialization skills than actual work experience. I hope that everyone will follow your lead and ask their location some questions before withdrawing support.

GrammaBabs
June 24th, 2013, 12:11 PM
Greed and dishonesty is everywhere in this country...especially "at the top" and in politics.... a good reason we've gotten to the point we are at... sorry... could not resist...
about 20yrs ago,, i remember seeing 20/20 John Stossil reporting on the "pork" in the government bills.... not much has changed...sorry for the soapbox,, i'm old and can't help it!!! LOL

WendyI
June 24th, 2013, 12:20 PM
Jet4361 - here we subsidize the disabled..so if you hire them you may only be paying cents on the dollar but our social services programs bump them up to minimum wage or whatever their disability pensions will allow. It's still an unfair system IMO, but at least we take care of them. It's disgusting though that the CEO's of a Goodwill can make that much money. However, people don't stay in those kinds of jobs if they can get better pay elsewhere...not that I"m justifying obscene salaries mind you....but people in the end will always look out for number one.

Sandy Navas
June 24th, 2013, 12:45 PM
I don't necessarily support or believe everything I see on SNOPES, but I do often look to them to verify things I've received in e-mail:

snopes.com: Executive Salaries in Charities (http://www.snopes.com/politics/business/charities.asp)

Salaries of Charity CEOs Compared - Urban Legends (http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl_charities_salaries.htm)

Top 25 Compensation Packages from the Charity Rating Guide (http://www.charitywatch.org/hottopics/Top25.html)

\Charity Navigator - 2012 CEO Compensation Study (http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=studies.ceo)

Highest Paid Charity CEOs (http://www.cnbc.com/id/100271511)

toggpine
June 24th, 2013, 01:25 PM
There have been lists published about where the best places are to donate. (My guess is Sandy linked to a few!) A lot of the "charitable" organizations are top-heavy with salaries!
It makes me think twice before giving or shopping there, that is for sure. We tend to give to our local community thrift shop if we can't find someone who needs it.

Tapestry
June 24th, 2013, 01:35 PM
Jet4361 is correct. My nephew worked for Goodwill a couple years ago and made less than minimum wage, but not pennies. His problem was that if he actually made the minimum wage, his disability checks would stop as well as his state housing and his medicaid. He sorted donations for whether they would actually make it to the next level of sorting for the store. It really was more to train him to work elsewhere by having him show up on time and ready to work. It kept him busy and he seemed to enjoy it enough.

As for the salaries they pay the CEO's; I can't justify it without knowing all the facts, but this is not the manager of the store that makes that kind of money. That person probably makes a good salary, but it's a hard job. Goodwill is a huge operation. The CEO likely manages several local operations and has to be a good businessman in order to make Goodwill a viable entity. It's a charity, for sure, but the CEO isn't :) If that person isn't paid enough for their education and skills, then off they go to someplace that would likely pay them even more. Around here, $500,000 for a CEO is pennies compared to the "real" world.

Naturally, my nephew got fired (very hard to do, actually) when he failed to keep showing up for work. He can't work in the private sector, so now he just has time on his hands. Grrr. :)

Pam

Cat n bull
June 24th, 2013, 01:42 PM
I worked with severe/profound handicapped children (8-22 years old) also, helping to train them for when they were no longer part of the public school system and were going to the next phase of their lives. The ones that had the ability to go to a place like Goodwill and work were paid very low wages in MA also.

You have to realize though that they are NOT paying for their living expenses with these wages. When they become adults and no longer considered part of the public school system, these work programs are what to do instead of go to school. If they are able to.

Many many many of them live in group homes, they are not capable of independent living. (the ones that earn the very low wages). They have ALL their living expenses met in other ways. State funds, federal funds, some are fortunate enough to have families that also contribute financially to their care.

These people are NOT able to be left alone, (again I am speaking of the ones with the very low wages) for their own safety they must have constant supervision. When a company like Goodwill agrees to allow them to work there, they are taking on the HUGE! responsibility for them while they are in their stores.

It is WONDERFUL for so many of them to have the opportunity to get on the bus everyday and go to work! Even if the only thing they are able to do is the simplest tasks, the happiness they feel when they "get it" and are finally able to do their task is one of the GREATEST joys I experienced working with them. I vividly remember teaching envelope stuffing, and it was the norm for the ENTIRE school to be unable to do this, for many and various reasons, and the celebration when a student would get that paper in the envelope!

CEO's ALWAYS earn profound salaries compared to the rest of their employees. The links posted about CEO salaries has FAR more objective information than the sensationalist news story! They news programs need ratings, and nothing grabs attention like poor misused handicapped people and greedy CEO's!

auntiemern
June 24th, 2013, 02:09 PM
Rhonda, I have read what everyone else has said about why the wages are set the way they are. It makes sense to me, only because they can't afford to loose their state and federal aid. I also find it offensive that CEO's make the kind of money they do. Just like the oil company execs. What I would like to know is where is all the money from sales going? I understand the overhead, the cost of operations and all that, but IMO, if they are doing it to make money, it is not a charity. At least not a 'not for profit'. Although it does aggravate me, I will probably still shop there on occasion, just cuz I love a good bargain, and love thrift store shopping.

K. McEuen
June 24th, 2013, 02:22 PM
but IMO, if they are doing it to make money, it is not a charity.

Let me pipe up with a little I know about this. A non-profit or not-for-profit - 501(c)3 - is allowed to make X amount of dollars a year that is non-taxable. If they go over the allowed amount, they do indeed have to pay income tax to the federal government. The non-profit status allows those who make donations to claim deductions no matter how much the organization makes.

bakermom
June 24th, 2013, 02:59 PM
This rears it's head every so often just to make people angry. While i may not agree with the huge salaries, they are CEO's of large corporations. And CEO's usually are compensated very well. It is a totally different animal than wages paid to workers. These reports are comparing apple to oranges. Having had a couple relatives that worked in similar situations(sheltered workshops) it is true they are not paid a lot , but it the training and the pride they have in having that"job" that is important.
Many if not most are receiving benefits from the county or state for their support so they aren't working to support themselves. Some function well enough to live on their own or in a group home, others will always require supervision.
These reports need to be balanced and tell the whole story, the sensationalism helps no one.

MartinaG
June 24th, 2013, 03:03 PM
My company has a charitable foundation and we have an employee-based committee that evaluates the charities we support. We review their financials, visit them, and find out how they used our money. I can say that most charities work on a shoestring budget and they are very responsible and very thankful for community support. Just like everything else, there are good ones and bad ones out there.

RFREE
June 25th, 2013, 06:50 AM
Greed and dishonesty is everywhere in this country...especially "at the top" and in politics.... a good reason we've gotten to the point we are at... sorry... could not resist...
about 20yrs ago,, i remember seeing 20/20 John Stossil reporting on the "pork" in the government bills.... not much has changed...sorry for the soapbox,, i'm old and can't help it!!! LOL

I agree. With that being said I guess it is what it is. So sad.

aqua-teal71
June 25th, 2013, 09:39 PM
Sandy, I too looked into charities before i gave. I compared goodwill and salvation army, and the army won. I cannot afford to give to as many charities as i used to, so i had to look into the ones that were giving back the most.

WVGranny
June 25th, 2013, 09:58 PM
Its not only the CEO of goodwill, but of the red cross, girl scouts and many other charities across the country even though they are non profit and collect millions of dollars a lot of it goes to administration