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RockyMountainHorseMama
September 2nd, 2010, 02:11 AM
Okay, so what is bias or bias binding or binding biased, or is it biased. and why/what are you biased about when you quilt?! Your fabric colours or something?! :lol: *snort* Anyways, if this is something I'm supposed to be doing when I quilt, well then ... OOPS! :icon_neutral: :0:D

jrchapman
September 2nd, 2010, 08:22 AM
Anything called bias means that it's cut at an angle rather than straight acorss the width or straight down the fabric. It's usually when you cut fabric so the grain goes at 45 degrees (have you seen the new tutorial on your tube - that's probably the best way to understand it).

When you cut fabric at an angle it is stretchier and moves differently so drapy clothes are generally cut on the bias.

You can get different effects - your stripes become diagonals - which can make really cute bindings.

hillbilly
September 2nd, 2010, 10:35 AM
Alot of quilters insist that if you don't cut your binding on the bias, then your quilt won't hold up. I for one have never cut binding on the bias. (Oh, do you hear the sirens???)

I think it's becoming more acceptable not to, as Moda promotes using jelly roles for binding.

I can't get the tool now, but I will in the future just to see the difference it makes. (Stupid empty pockets.)

jrchapman
September 2nd, 2010, 10:53 AM
I know that bias bindings are very good for curves so if you have a scalloped edge or you're doing round placemats I would cut on the bias.

I generally do a double binding which I believe is stronger anyway so I can't be faffed with bias strips.

janluna
September 2nd, 2010, 10:56 AM
I know that bias bindings are very good for curves so if you have a scalloped edge or you're doing round placemats I would cut on the bias.

I generally do a double binding which I believe is stronger anyway so I can't be faffed with bias strips.
What is a double binding? Forgive another newbie question? {:-)

hillbilly
September 2nd, 2010, 11:57 AM
I know that bias bindings are very good for curves so if you have a scalloped edge or you're doing round placemats I would cut on the bias.

I generally do a double binding which I believe is stronger anyway so I can't be faffed with bias strips.

I do double as well. I am getting ready to do a scalloped edge quilt. I didn't even think about that! Maybe I should attempt to squeeze the piggy bank for today's deal!

hillbilly
September 2nd, 2010, 11:59 AM
What is a double binding? Forgive another newbie question? {:-)

I tried to find a video for this...never mind, all I found was how to tie people up!!:icon_razz:

ktbb
September 2nd, 2010, 12:01 PM
What is a double binding? Forgive another newbie question? {:-)

double binding is when you have two layers of fabric that fold over the edge of the quilt sandwich. A single binding only has one layer of fabric. Double bindings are, in my opinion, better on a quilt that will be used and washed a lot, since you have better coverage on the edge of the quilt. single layers are fine for wall hangings, etc. that don't get much use.

double bindings start with one strip of fabric which is folded in half lengthwise before it's sewn onto the quilt.

jrchapman
September 2nd, 2010, 04:33 PM
I tried to find a video for this...never mind, all I found was how to tie people up!!:icon_razz:

HA HA HA HA Wait til your husband sees your browsing history!!!

JulesinMI
September 2nd, 2010, 09:07 PM
I compromise . . . use a bias binding on my quilts because they will be washed and have to hold up. I use a straight binding on wallhangings. I've always used a double binding . . . didn't even know it was acceptable to use a single!

LOL to hillbilly . . . hope you remember your Girl Scout knots!

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 2nd, 2010, 11:18 PM
Anything called bias means that it's cut at an angle rather than straight acorss the width or straight down the fabric. It's usually when you cut fabric so the grain goes at 45 degrees (have you seen the new tutorial on your tube - that's probably the best way to understand it).

When you cut fabric at an angle it is stretchier and moves differently so drapy clothes are generally cut on the bias.

You can get different effects - your stripes become diagonals - which can make really cute bindings.

Uhhhhhhhhh ... okay I still don't get it ... I hate being stupid! :icon_umpf:Going to go find that video, just hope it's one of Jenny's! :icon_confused:

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 2nd, 2010, 11:19 PM
Alot of quilters insist that if you don't cut your binding on the bias, then your quilt won't hold up. I for one have never cut binding on the bias. (Oh, do you hear the sirens???)

I think it's becoming more acceptable not to, as Moda promotes using jelly roles for binding.

I can't get the tool now, but I will in the future just to see the difference it makes. (Stupid empty pockets.)

OH THANK GAWAD! Well, we'll see if mine hold up, if I EVER get one qulited! :icon_rolleyes:

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 2nd, 2010, 11:22 PM
double binding is when you have two layers of fabric that fold over the edge of the quilt sandwich. A single binding only has one layer of fabric. Double bindings are, in my opinion, better on a quilt that will be used and washed a lot, since you have better coverage on the edge of the quilt. single layers are fine for wall hangings, etc. that don't get much use.

double bindings start with one strip of fabric which is folded in half lengthwise before it's sewn onto the quilt.

Okay, I know what binding is, and since Jenny taught me, I've been doing it doubled. :D

Texsam
September 2nd, 2010, 11:50 PM
Uhhhhhhhhh ... okay I still don't get it ... I hate being stupid! :icon_umpf:Going to go find that video, just hope it's one of Jenny's! :icon_confused:

:icon_tape:

Sorry:icon_hug:

Texsam
September 3rd, 2010, 09:31 AM
And you're not stupid.


I used that thick packaged binding on the first quilts I made. Man that stuff was hard to sew down and I had to do it all by hand because the machine I had at the time wouldn't sew it. I had some sore fingers after that. :(

sandyquilts
September 4th, 2010, 01:00 AM
I only use bias binding .... out of a fat quarter I can make 12 yards of binding. I can get 15yds of binding from a half yard cut. Here's a photo tutorial

http://sandyquilts.blogspot.com/2009/07/bias-binding-tutorial.html

shell.scraps
September 4th, 2010, 11:21 AM
I didn't know you could do a single binding?? I've always cut a 2.5" strip and folded it in half and used that as my binding. I've never been good at cutting a straight bias continuous binding strip so I haven't used that method either.

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 4th, 2010, 01:27 PM
And you're not stupid.


I used that thick packaged binding on the first quilts I made. Man that stuff was hard to sew down and I had to do it all by hand because the machine I had at the time wouldn't sew it. I had some sore fingers after that. :(

I'm a lot of things but stupid isn't one of them, my GMAT scores back that up *snort*:D ... that being said, I still just don't get what the heck BIAS binding is. I know what binding is and I do it doubled but what does bias have to do with it and WHY?! Apparently, it's applied like double binding but ... why would I make or used stuff "cut on the bias" ... whatever bias means ... that's why I feel STUPID and I HATE when I don't get something ... gah!:icon_doh:

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 4th, 2010, 01:30 PM
I only use bias binding .... out of a fat quarter I can make 12 yards of binding. I can get 15yds of binding from a half yard cut. Here's a photo tutorial

http://sandyquilts.blogspot.com/2009/07/bias-binding-tutorial.html

I thank you for the link and love your blog and I'll list as a follower and all but ... I don't get it. I learn by watching videos, someone has to be doing it. I just can't follow pics .. that's why I don't buy quilting books ... I either have to figure it out by trial-and-error, or watching a video then making a few and then correcting (trial-and-error) ... too much of a visual/tactile learner :icon_rolleyes:

Texsam
September 4th, 2010, 01:47 PM
If this is not correct then someone can correct me. To make a bias binding you cut the fabric at a 45 degree angle instead of on the grain. Here is a link to one of the videos I've watched on YouTude and Jenny has one where she uses the new ruler that was a Daily Deal day before yesterday I think. There are other videos to watch on how to make it and sew it. My understanding is the bias binding is used for curved borders or quilts that will be used and washed a lot - like baby quilts. Good luck! I shy away from cutting on the bias because it freaks me out for some reason - just weird I guess.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cedg4qE7MSo

I hope this link works.

If not I'll try something else.

Texsam
September 4th, 2010, 03:12 PM
I'm a lot of things but stupid isn't one of them, my GMAT scores back that up *snort*:D ... that being said, I still just don't get what the heck BIAS binding is. I know what binding is and I do it doubled but what does bias have to do with it and WHY?! Apparently, it's applied like double binding but ... why would I make or used stuff "cut on the bias" ... whatever bias means ... that's why I feel STUPID and I HATE when I don't get something ... gah!:icon_doh:

Ok I think maybe I get what you're asking (maybe). It's just called bias (has nothing to do with how you feel about it) binding because it isn't cut on the straight of grain. It's stretchier than the straight of grain and I think you see a lot more cutting material on the bias in garment sewing. That's why people use it for curved borders and such. I suppose they could have picked a better term for it. I guess you could be "bias" if you liked one binding over the other. I don't know how to 'splain it any better.

janluna
September 4th, 2010, 03:57 PM
Good one shelia, makes sense to me.

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 4th, 2010, 04:00 PM
the straight of grain. It's stretchier than the straight of grain and I think you see a lot more cutting material on the bias in garment sewing.

Okay ... HUH?! :icon_beuj: You know back in high-school I couldn't get sewing class correct b/c I didn't get "bias" then EITHER! I can sew clothes, all of my husband's Aloha shirts are custom made by, moi'. However, I ignore any "bias" statements coz I dunno what the hell they're talking about?!!! But my clothes have always come out fine.

I guess "grain" means like grain of wood? and if so, why does it affect my sewing? Guess I don't see or I just overlook the "stretching" ... still don't see why I need to use this ... but then I haven't finished many quilts where I need to bind them. Only my small "practice" quilts and QAYG stuff and the binding seems fine on those (did the double binding)

CHEEZ WHIZ! This is frustrating! I apologize if it is for you folks too, maybe I should just never have ASKED ... gah! :icon_doh::lol:

jrchapman
September 4th, 2010, 05:27 PM
Don't worry about it, the only reason I know about it is from dress making (at 5'10 I've always struggled to find things long enough).

The grain in a fabric is made when it is woven. You have threads that go up the whole length of the fabric (the warp) and the ones that get woven back and forwards across the width (the weft). When you talk about the grain you're talking about cutting in the direction of one of these threads.

http://common.csnstores.com/common/marketing/warp_weft.jpg

If you want to feel the real difference cutting on the bias can make, take a fat quarter and try and stretch it across the width. There should be barely any movement. Then take the top left and bottom right corners and give it a tug. It'll be really stretchy.

The stretch you get is what makes it perfect for going round corners and the fact that you're not cutting along the same line as the main threads it what makes it stronger.

Does that help?

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 4th, 2010, 06:44 PM
Don't worry about it, the only reason I know about it is from dress making (at 5'10 I've always struggled to find things long enough).

The grain in a fabric is made when it is woven. You have threads that go up the whole length of the fabric (the warp) and the ones that get woven back and forwards across the width (the weft). When you talk about the grain you're talking about cutting in the direction of one of these threads.

http://common.csnstores.com/common/marketing/warp_weft.jpg

If you want to feel the real difference cutting on the bias can make, take a fat quarter and try and stretch it across the width. There should be barely any movement. Then take the top left and bottom right corners and give it a tug. It'll be really stretchy.

The stretch you get is what makes it perfect for going round corners and the fact that you're not cutting along the same line as the main threads it what makes it stronger.

Does that help?

OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH, I SEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!! (went and stretched the fabric like you said, see?! visual/tactile learner :lol:) Thank you SO MUCH! (HOW many years and I freakin FINALLY get it?!:icon_rofl:my sisters will roflol when I tell them and then I can actually 'splain it!)

Okay, then ... now that I actually GET bias ... why does it affect binding and how? I get that it's stretchy but why would you want your binding to stretch, wouldn't that make your quilt come apart over time as opposed to standard binding w/mitered corners? I do plan to one day soon, do scalloped edges, how would "bias binding" do compared to regular double binding, why do I need it to stretch is what I'm trying to figure out here.

hillbilly
September 4th, 2010, 11:37 PM
OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH, I SEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!! (went and stretched the fabric like you said, see?! visual/tactile learner :lol:) Thank you SO MUCH! (HOW many years and I freakin FINALLY get it?!:icon_rofl:my sisters will roflol when I tell them and then I can actually 'splain it!)

Okay, then ... now that I actually GET bias ... why does it affect binding and how? I get that it's stretchy but why would you want your binding to stretch, wouldn't that make your quilt come apart over time as opposed to standard binding w/mitered corners? I do plan to one day soon, do scalloped edges, how would "bias binding" do compared to regular double binding, why do I need it to stretch is what I'm trying to figure out here.

I am so glad that you aren't afraid to ask questions...they are great questions! The bias is stronger as well as stretchy which is why people like it. And the stretch is easier for the curves.

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 5th, 2010, 12:41 AM
I am so glad that you aren't afraid to ask questions...they are great questions! The bias is stronger as well as stretchy which is why people like it. And the stretch is easier for the curves.

Okay, so stupid me had to refer to a physics viscosity problem/law to get this one and low-and-behold ... :icon_doh:now it makes sense! But only b/c you gals 'splained it to dis Lucy!:lol:

Well, when I finally get to doing a scalloped edge, however, The Goddess Jenny teaches it (biased binding or not) that's what I'm going to do! :lol:

Mahalo (thank you) for all your kokua! (help/assistance)

Dragonfly
September 5th, 2010, 12:43 AM
I am so glad that you aren't afraid to ask questions...they are great questions! The bias is stronger as well as stretchy which is why people like it. And the stretch is easier for the curves.

A part of why it is stronger is because of that stretch, it allows the binding to 'move' while being handled creating less wear on the fabric. With a straight cut binding the same few threads are always at that very outside edge, there is no 'give' so that section of threads tend to wear more. You won't see it in the short term but I have quilts made about 18 years ago where the binding is showing distinct signs of wear. I don't stress on it though, I always use straight cut except where I need to get around curves. I figure bindings are easy enough to replace. :)

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 5th, 2010, 12:51 AM
A part of why it is stronger is because of that stretch, it allows the binding to 'move' while being handled creating less wear on the fabric. With a straight cut binding the same few threads are always at that very outside edge, there is no 'give' so that section of threads tend to wear more. You won't see it in the short term but I have quilts made about 18 years ago where the binding is showing distinct signs of wear. I don't stress on it though, I always use straight cut except where I need to get around curves. I figure bindings are easy enough to replace. :)

Lynn, we must've been typing at the same time!:lol: Thank you so much I appreciate that, you made that easy for me to understand *WHEW*! I agree that binding seems easy enough to replace, but then I haven't had to replace any yet so maybe I shouldn't "think" like that :lol:

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 5th, 2010, 12:53 AM
I am so glad that you aren't afraid to ask questions...they are great questions! The bias is stronger as well as stretchy which is why people like it. And the stretch is easier for the curves.

No, not ever afraid. I think it would be MORE stupid of me NOT to ask and keep wondering forEVER what the heck bias binding is and what it's used for and why I would use it as opposed to straight binding! :lol: Thank you so much Tonya!

Dragonfly
September 5th, 2010, 01:01 AM
No, not ever afraid. I think it would be MORE stupid of me NOT to ask and keep wondering forEVER

This is what I always emphasize when teaching beginners classes...'The only dumb question is the one you don't ask' and besides, if you don't know, chances are someone else won't know, so asking may do others a huge favour as well. :)

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 5th, 2010, 12:04 PM
This is what I always emphasize when teaching beginners classes...'The only dumb question is the one you don't ask' and besides, if you don't know, chances are someone else won't know, so asking may do others a huge favour as well. :)

Thank you for that, Lynn! :icon_hug:

Now I'm wondering if I should switch and make a bunch of bias binding and use that?! AW MAAAN! NOW look what happened?!:icon_doh: :lol:

hillbilly
September 5th, 2010, 09:24 PM
Thank you for that, Lynn! :icon_hug:

Now I'm wondering if I should switch and make a bunch of bias binding and use that?! AW MAAAN! NOW look what happened?!:icon_doh: :lol:

I have a book I'm going to mail to you when I get some spare change. It's called Happy Endings, and it explains so much. You understand...it's a gift! I only read through it once years ago, and again today when thinking about you. Message me your snail mail addy.

RockyMountainHorseMama
September 5th, 2010, 10:34 PM
I have a book I'm going to mail to you when I get some spare change. It's called Happy Endings, and it explains so much. You understand...it's a gift! I only read through it once years ago, and again today when thinking about you. Message me your snail mail addy.


:icon_surprised: You don't have to do that! How incredibly kind and generous of you! I am so touched! :icon_hug: The only problem is, I don't do so well w/books. I have to WATCH someone do it. I got a book recently as a gift, b/c I want to make Lone Star and Giant Dahlias but ... um .... yah ... I ain't gittin what thay puttin day-yown! :lol: But I'll surely give it my best!

janluna
September 5th, 2010, 11:34 PM
oh that's so sweet.